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  1. #61
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    Another request....how about a pic of the backside of that Skinner 3 jaw chuck with the plug removed?

    Members NEED to see that as it is an excellent illustration of how to make your backplates for absolute MINIMUM stick out.

    I have been trying to preach that for years but it's difficult to explain without pics and I can't access my old pics any more.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by pre64win View Post
    Hi tobnpr. That setup was unrealistic for anything other than just test cutting some threads. It was a 6" scrap section of barrel which included little more than the chamber and tenon. I simply chucked up the bore-end in my 3-jaw and took advantage of the cone breech, using the dead center it to center the chamber for my tenon thread cutting test.

    For work I have done on full barrels, I have always chucked up one end wrapped in copper sheet (typically the muzzle) and supported the other end in a steady rest. That seems to work well and generally finds a true center for the chamber, although I am not sure this is the best way. I'd be interested to hear how others do it.

    Because I am usually working on antique parts, on which I am frequently trying to preserve the original bluing, the steady rest is not always ideal. If there are other ways to chuck up a barrel which permits properly centered work on the tenon, AND preserves the original bluing, I would be interested in hearing it.
    Lots of ways to work between centers, for speed and accuracy I make a truing cut about an inch long at the muzzle end, flip it over and drive it in a collet to work on the business end.

    I will not work on a blued barrel without a waiver (just not worth the risk of paying for a hot blue job to me), but try a piece of fine sandcloth slightly short of the barrel diameter where it will ride in the steady. Oil it up well, wrap abrasive side up, cloth against the barrel. Snug the posts up against the abrasive side of the cloth.
    Be sure to keep it lubed, and the posts snug, so that it will not slip.
    The barrel rides on the oiled cloth, and will not mar it...

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    Another request....how about a pic of the backside of that Skinner 3 jaw chuck with the plug removed?

    Members NEED to see that as it is an excellent illustration of how to make your backplates for absolute MINIMUM stick out.

    I have been trying to preach that for years but it's difficult to explain without pics and I can't access my old pics any more.
    10K - as requested...




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  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by tobnpr View Post
    Lots of ways to work between centers, for speed and accuracy I make a truing cut about an inch long at the muzzle end, flip it over and drive it in a collet to work on the business end.

    I will not work on a blued barrel without a waiver (just not worth the risk of paying for a hot blue job to me), but try a piece of fine sandcloth slightly short of the barrel diameter where it will ride in the steady. Oil it up well, wrap abrasive side up, cloth against the barrel. Snug the posts up against the abrasive side of the cloth.
    Be sure to keep it lubed, and the posts snug, so that it will not slip.
    The barrel rides on the oiled cloth, and will not mar it...
    Thanks for that! Great info. Mostly, I am just working on my own parts, so no need to worry about trashing a customer's part. But if I can preserve a decent bluing job, I will always prefer this over rebluing something. Especially if the bluing job is original. Thanks again!

  6. #65
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    For the person who asked about the pedestal base arrangement - it's made of plate and pipe on top of heavy steel cabinets. The cabinet bases themselves have heavy-duty adjustable feet, so setting up the lathe involved...

    1. Leveling the cabinets
    2. Putting on the chip pan
    3. Leveling the cabinets again
    4. Putting on the pedestals
    5. Checking the level across the pedestals and leveling the cabinets again
    6. Setting the lathe on the pedestals
    7. Shimming between the lathe and the pedestals before bolting the lathe to the pedestals


    The above is somewhat tongue in cheek, as I think we could (should) have assembled the cabinets, chip pan and pedestals before we ever started adjusting for level. However, John recommended we level and re-level after each step. In the end, maybe John was right - we were able to bolt the lathe to the pedestals with only one piece of oil soaked card stock as a shim under a single lathe base bolt.


  7. #66
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    Your friend John is not one-of-a-kind, but there are not a lot of men of his talent and drive left. He has left you the result of a life of precision. Give enough of your time to involve him in your work on a regular basis. Find yourself a copy of L.H. Sparey's book, "The Amateur's Lathe". In your spare time, figure out a way to avoid the auctioneer, by giving the lathe to the right person. Don't wait too long to do the same with your Winchesters. Regards, Clark

  8. #67
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    Most Auction company's are crooks, it is a fact of life. This man loved his lathe, that's for sure.

  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by tobnpr View Post
    Lots of ways to work between centers, for speed and accuracy I make a truing cut about an inch long at the muzzle end, flip it over and drive it in a collet to work on the business end.

    I will not work on a blued barrel without a waiver (just not worth the risk of paying for a hot blue job to me), but try a piece of fine sandcloth slightly short of the barrel diameter where it will ride in the steady. Oil it up well, wrap abrasive side up, cloth against the barrel. Snug the posts up against the abrasive side of the cloth.
    Be sure to keep it lubed, and the posts snug, so that it will not slip.
    The barrel rides on the oiled cloth, and will not mar it...
    topnpr: The technique you describe for working on blued barrels sounds interesting. Hadn't thought of that! My steady has brass fingers (SB9 "telescoping" steady with the thimbles). Is there any concern about the abrasive side of the sandcloth imbedding some of the abrasive granules in the softer brass of the steady, and possibly marring subsequent work? What little barrel work I've done has been on stainless steel, but do have an upcoming project that involves a blued barrel (shorten and rechamber a .22 rimfire) and your tip got my attention. I would definitely like to preserve it's finish if possible.

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    Does anyone have a photo of a radius tool they can post?

    I have to believe John had a tool for cutting radii among all his other attachments, but I can't seem to find anything that looks like it would serve this purpose. If anyone can point me to one, just so I know what I am looking for, I would appreciate it.

    Thanks,

    Justin

  11. #70
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    You may like this by a forum member...should at least give you some ideas.
    http://www.lepton.com/metal/ball_turner.html

    Your friend John likely used the 'ol swiveling compound trick described in SB literature.

    A cheap boring head can be employed as the basis for one too.

  12. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    You may like this by a forum member...should at least give you some ideas.
    http://www.lepton.com/metal/ball_turner.html

    Your friend John likely used the 'ol swiveling compound trick described in SB literature.

    A cheap boring head can be employed as the basis for one too.
    Very cool! Thanks 10K. Looks like I have a project to take on

  13. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuickChange View Post
    topnpr: The technique you describe for working on blued barrels sounds interesting. Hadn't thought of that! My steady has brass fingers (SB9 "telescoping" steady with the thimbles). Is there any concern about the abrasive side of the sandcloth imbedding some of the abrasive granules in the softer brass of the steady, and possibly marring subsequent work? What little barrel work I've done has been on stainless steel, but do have an upcoming project that involves a blued barrel (shorten and rechamber a .22 rimfire) and your tip got my attention. I would definitely like to preserve it's finish if possible.
    Fair question, don't know...(mine has the cast iron fingers), but absent it slipping (and it shouldn't) wouldn't think so. Simple enough to clean up with a stone or file to be sure.
    Important to keep chips out- I'll sometimes use a cardboard collar/chip shield split to slip over the barrel up against the steady.


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