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  1. #21
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    my only other thought is two guys with dead blow hammers...one tapping the left end of the table to the right and one tapping right end of the table back toward the column..light hits in unison.

    Since someone that owns one has suggested that the gib is "blind" from the backside, that would mean that you are not going to get to it via a piece of stock slid in from the right.
    Last edited by iwananew10K; 10-13-2017 at 12:21 PM.

  2. #22
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    Hi I didn't mean that the gib was necessarily blind just that I didn't think you could see much from the knee side of the saddle.
    Andy

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    So, yes the narrow inner end of the gib can be reached by going in from the other side, after removing that gib. I measured the depth of what I can reach and compared it to the saddle, and how long the gibs are, and I am certain I can get some solid hits on the gib, to help drive it out. Really, I am a little concerned beating on something thats lodged way into the dovetail, where I can't see if it's causing any damage. Maybe If I had a soft drift, like a piece of brass flat bar...? And, I did remove the zerks, and get the plastic straws all the way down to soak it with some kroil. If I removed the table and saddle together, I would still be stuck (pun somewhat intended) as there is no access to any of it from underneath.
    SD

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by badwithusernames View Post
    So, yes the narrow inner end of the gib can be reached by going in from the other side, after removing that gib. I measured the depth of what I can reach and compared it to the saddle, and how long the gibs are, and I am certain I can get some solid hits on the gib, to help drive it out. Really, I am a little concerned beating on something thats lodged way into the dovetail, where I can't see if it's causing any damage. Maybe If I had a soft drift, like a piece of brass flat bar...?
    Not so sure "soft" is what is best. I'd want a material that was hard enough to assure the bar did not "upset" and add one MORE wedged-in item - EG: toolsteel ground stock if I had my druthers AND NOT Aluminium nor Brass.

    Most important that the end of it gets near-as-dammit full and perfect contact with the end of the gib before it is struck, so it doesn't flare or upset that, either.

    A hydraulic "pulling" cylinder, else a "push" cylinder and some chain - either way, pre-loading in the "apart" direction - it may pop-free, first modest whack.

    Or so we hope for yah..


  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy St View Post
    That brake pad /shoe is made out of a phenolic cloth plastic (Micarta).
    Andy,

    What does the brake 'pad' bear against? My machine only has the pulley cone. I'm curious if I would be able to put a brake on my machine.

    -Jake

  6. #26
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    104_2915.jpg


    Brake pad on South Bend Mill.



    RF

  7. #27
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    Jake
    I thought all of these mills had a brake. I just looked at the parts manual and apparently some had just the pulley like yours and others had a disk bolted to the pulley like mine. That disk was used for the brake. Ill dig my motor up soon and post a photo if that would help you. I don't think it would be to hard to make the parts to change it over.

    Andy

  8. #28
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    Thanks RF you beat me to it. RF's pad looks different than mine. Mine works great but might not be factory.

    Andy

  9. #29
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    I don't have my mill anymore, but I vaguely remember that the brake may have been an option or was added later. I'll have to track down my parts book file.

    RF


    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/4833.pdf
    Last edited by RF; 10-16-2017 at 05:15 PM. Reason: added link

  10. #30
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    OK, link gives you whole manual not just the page I wanted, Sorry. Scroll to page 11 of 22 and it shows the brake mechanism.

    RF

  11. #31
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    Success!
    After a few tries with various solvents, penetrating oils, and methods of moving the table with no results I stepped my efforts up a notch.
    img_9898.jpgimg_9899-1.jpg
    It was tight at first but moved easily after the first inch, and the gib slid right out. It looks like there were some chips jammed between it and the dovetail, binding it up.
    The apron is filthy, so I kept going with disassembly
    img_9900.jpgimg_9901.jpgimg_9902.jpg
    Really happy with the decision to clean it, there is a ton of dried grease and chips in everything.

  12. Likes Paolo_MD, jmumbauer liked this post
  13. #32
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    I cleaned several pounds of swarf out of the knee, and then managed to coax out the gib. Tomorrow I'll get it completely apart and cleaned..
    img_9905.jpgimg_9907.jpgimg_9908.jpg
    Under the apron, on top of the knee is a cover for the knee elevation gears, and the cover is worn paper thin from water collecting on top of it. I'm going to try to coax the screws out and make a new cover.
    So, read that in spite of having zerk fittings, the table, apron, and knee should be oiled. I can see it for the table, as there is a place for the oil to drain, and as it drains it lubricates the table feed screw, and from that it lubricates the apron screw. But the knee seems better suited for grease IMO. Any thoughts on this?
    img_9903.jpgimg_9904.jpg
    Thanks for the info and advice this far, its a big help.
    SD


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