Spindle thru Hole Sizes and Vintage Lathes
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  1. #1
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    Default Spindle thru Hole Sizes and Vintage Lathes

    Greetings from Carpinteria Ca,

    I am squarely bit by the vintage South Bend Lathe bug and am trying to figure what models might answer my rescue search. I have been a lurker for a long time here, doing the reading / admiring and know that I would like a pre-war or earlier lathe.

    My interest is a lathe with a spindle thru hole of 1 3/8" or a bit larger. It appears that the early 11 & 13" units have smaller spindle openings....So my question : What if any early models have a larger thru hole

    Currently on ebay there is a 13" mdl 34-O that warms my heart in a big way (smile)........more than I can afford at the moment (still adding to the $ pile) plus too far away to reasonably ship and I believe this unit would have a 3/4" thru hole, but that is the idea of what my dream is made of. Thanks in advance for any information. tim

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    For a South Bend lathe just make sure it uses a 2 1/4-8 spindle thread. This should give you the spindle bore you want. I don't believe any of the 11" lathes had the large bore but the later model 10", 13" 14 1/2" and 16" lathes had the larger bore and by later I mean anything from about 1950 up thru the 90's when they started to drop these lathe models.

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    I've got a 1939 heavy 9 that has a 2-1/4 - 8 spindle thread and a 1-3/8 through hole so you can add the heavy nine to your quest list

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    In the 1920's only the 16" and up had 1-3/8 or larger thru holes. This was not seen in the smaller lathes until the 'One Inch Collet' models came out in the late 1930's?

    A catalog: http://www.wswells.com/data/catalog/...bum/index.html

    allan

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    My 1941 10L has the 1 3/8" hole but my 1919 15" is like 7/8"...Bob
    Bob Wright Metal Master Fab
    Salem, Ohio Birthplace of the Silver and Deming Drill, all others are copies.

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    here are the sizes at the top of this group

    southbendmanual : ________* * * Manuals /Discussion* * *

    Ed S

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    But that list only covers later machines. There are some older ones listed in the docs at wswells.com.

    allan

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    Go by the spindle thread not the year - there were years when 10" and 13" lathes were being made with both sizes of spindle (I'd guess '30's to '50's).

    The other thing to do is to try and find the lathe in the catalogues on Steve Wells site:
    The SBL Workshop - Home
    You have a catalogue no. to look for, 34-O, which might be quite early - if the revisions in catalogue number for a given size of machine followed a logical order, it has evaded me in my looks through the catalogues! O is probably the length, 34 should tell you when and what spindle.

    Good luck!

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    Gentlemen,

    I would like to thank all of you for the speedy reply's. Exactly the information I was looking for. Cheers. tim

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    Oh, and that 34-0 has been on ebay for a long time, probably because the price is so high. It is however, a neat old machine, and fairly rare, coming from that brief period before SB started using the Flather gearbox, and made their own 3 speed instead. Probably 1920 or 21. Definately small spindle hole.

    allan

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    My 16" SBL made 1956 has 1.375" bore.

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    My 1950 13" CL 145C with a 2 1/4-8 spindle has a 1 7/8" thru the chuck

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    Here is a link to Steve's site for the old iron spindle size's http://www.wswells.com/data/catalog/...at_79jr_04.jpg ...Bob
    Bob Wright Metal Master Fab
    Salem, Ohio Birthplace of the Silver and Deming Drill, all others are copies.

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    I recently purchased a 1917 South Bend that was sold as a 16 incher, but all the data plates except the name plate are missing. I'm trying to figure out exactly what I bought. The major diameter of the spindle hole appears to be 1.31 inches and the rest of the hole is 1.16. The catalogs from the 20's and 30's say these machines have a MT3 spindle taper, but those numbers (1.31 and 1.16) don't match any MT dimensions that I have seen. Any suggestions as to sources?

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    look for a heavy 10 inch with a 2 1/4-8 spindle nose or a 13 inch with the same. you will be glad you got the
    larger spindle nose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by englandm45 View Post
    I recently purchased a 1917 South Bend that was sold as a 16 incher, but all the data plates except the name plate are missing. I'm trying to figure out exactly what I bought. The major diameter of the spindle hole appears to be 1.31 inches and the rest of the hole is 1.16. The catalogs from the 20's and 30's say these machines have a MT3 spindle taper, but those numbers (1.31 and 1.16) don't match any MT dimensions that I have seen. Any suggestions as to sources?
    How about you give us the serial number off the tailstock end of the bed, between the front ways. I have a feeling your date might be off.

    allan

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    Quote Originally Posted by englandm45 View Post
    I recently purchased a 1917 South Bend that was sold as a 16 incher, but all the data plates except the name plate are missing. I'm trying to figure out exactly what I bought. The major diameter of the spindle hole appears to be 1.31 inches and the rest of the hole is 1.16. The catalogs from the 20's and 30's say these machines have a MT3 spindle taper, but those numbers (1.31 and 1.16) don't match any MT dimensions that I have seen. Any suggestions as to sources?
    My 1919 15" has a 1 1/8" hole measured on the left end of the spindle...Bob
    Bob Wright Metal Master Fab
    Salem, Ohio Birthplace of the Silver and Deming Drill, all others are copies.


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