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  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paula View Post
    Pete, this thread never was a 'sticky' (that I recall), though it is included in the Noteworthy Threads sticky. Like James said, you may be confusing this thread with the 'What have you made with your lathe?' thread.

    Once a certain quantity of stickies is reached, attention becomes diffused to the point where they cease to have any impact at all, and mainly serve to overwhelm the newcomer. Witness the number of recurring questions which could be easily answered by reviewing the threads at the top of the forum.

    What I would suggest, and what I do, is to maintain a 'Favorites' folder dedicated to forum threads or posts that you are interested in revisiting. I find that it works very well.

    Paula
    I probably am confused on whether the thread was a sticky. I guess 'cause it was at the top a lot I might have 'assumed'.

    I have such a folder (lots of them!) as memory doesn't work as well as it did when I was younger.

    The recurring question thing is why I have greatly reduced my active participation in a couple of other boards. Those sites don't have libraries of common questions or stickies or FAQ threads or...... So it's the same old same old day after day and it's tiring scanning through all those posts to find 'new' material.

    This board seems to keep things moving, and has a bunch of fun folks besides, so I seem to spend most of my time here now.

    Thanks!
    Pete

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paula View Post
    Here's a lathe project I completed a while back -- the MLA-6 rear mounting toolpost from Metal Lathe Accessories:

    Paula
    I just simply must fit up one of those cross slides if for no other reason than to have a rear mounted cut-off tool. Even with a QCTP I would use the heck out of such a set-up. Many jobs involve having the QCTP at some angle other than perpendicular thus precluding the ready use of a cut-off tool. When making more than a couple of parts, having to change the tool post angle just to do the cut-off is a pain!

    Such a cross slide would, of course, need to include the block for a taper attachment.

    Pete

  3. #123
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    today i finished my thread dial and used it for the first time. i didn't want to do anything to the casting of the apron to get the dial mounted so i made a bracket off of the bolts the 1/2 nuts use.

    it is the kit that garyphansen is selling and it works perfect.


  4. #124
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    a few hours after mounting my thread dial i made this thread protector out of aluminum.


  5. #125
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    Swigin: Nice work! You might want to consider drilling a hole in the edge of your thread protector for a Tommy bar if it gets stuck. I have a hole in the edge of a face plate I made and have had to use it a few times to get the face plate off. Gary P. Hansen

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10KPete View Post

    I probably am confused on whether the thread was a sticky. I guess 'cause it was at the top a lot I might have 'assumed'.
    You'll be happy to know... this thread has now earned 'sticky'-status!

    Yes, we're getting a lot of stickies, but what the heck...

    Paula

  7. #127
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    Lots of stickies means more great information ready to hand!

    Thanks,
    Pete

  8. #128
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    Default South Bend lathe 9A home made follower rest

    I have used my steady rest a about 15 times, but the need for a follower rest only came up a few times and I found a right away need for one and did not want to buy a new one or wait to get one on ebay. So I made one based on a design I saw for a 13" SB lathe.
    I sawed and milled a 1/4" steel plate and bent the off set cold in a heavy vice with a big hammer. I welded the top L on but could have screwed one on.
    Anyway it worked great for my quick one off acme screws.
    Walt

  9. #129
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    Looks good Walter! I am surprised at how much they bring on Ebay based on how often the need for one arises. Gary P. Hansen

  10. #130
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    Talking Faceplate

    I made this faceplate for my 405-Y Workshop model. This is from a casting I bought from Craig Donges.

    First, sincere thanks go out to Bob "aametalmaster" and Tom "Flathead4". Bob for the offline advice and instructions, and Tom for graciously sending me a photocopy of his original drawing of the change gear setup for the Workshop lathe.

    This is my first real project, and the first time I cut threads. It was a great learning experience that showed me some of the idiosyncrasies of my lathe.
    At any rate, it screws on the spindle (1 3/8 - 10 tpi thread) and looks pretty darn good to my eyes!!

    So here's the proof:




  11. #131
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    Dale,

    Very nice. I particularly like the concentic grooves.

    Tom

  12. #132
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    I have to agree with Tom. Great work, especially for a first effort!



    Paula

  13. #133
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    How did I miss this thread until now? I stayed up till 2 AM + last night reading all posts in it. Wow!

    So here's some of my contributions:

    I made this over the Labor Day weekend when I discovered I needed to make a small batch of identical pins for a project. It is a collet stop.



    Here it is disassembled so you can see the parts:



    The main rod is just a piece of 3/8-16 threaded rod I had laying around. A "drop" from another project. I only had to cut about 1/2" off to bring it to length. How's that for efficient use of stock. The brass hex nut is a standard compression nut for 1/2" pipe size: I bought it to save time. I have used brass compression nuts with little or no modification in several projects and even for items I have sold. Great time saver. The small, round brass nut was made from a small scrap of brass from my scrap draw. If you notice flats on it, they are not necessary but only there because my scrap was only 1/2" wide and the nut is 5/8" diameter. It was tapped and then turned to final size on a piece of threaded rod after facing the outer face of two nuts that were tightened together near the end of the rod. This made thee thread very perpendicular to the face as is needed for this application. The large steel lock nut was turned from a 3/4" hardware store bolt. I use them for a lot of things that need a round shank and a larger flange or thumbwheel like this. It fits through the brass compression nut and tightens against the small brass nut to lock the shaft in position. The hex nut holds the small nut firmly against the back surface of the collet closer's tube: this makes the positioning very repeatable.

    The front end of the shaft is turned down to 0.120" to fit loose inside my 1/8" collet and the trreads are removed about 2" further back to allow easy entry into the back of that one and all larger size collets. I threaded the back end the collet closer that came with my lathe with a 20 TPI thread to match the compression nut. No fancy measurement, I just turned it down to the approximate diameter and then threaded it down until the nut fit. A bit of light filing on the crests was needed to produce proper flats there.

    Here it is assembled on the manual collet closer:



    I made the shaft just long enough to stick out of the collets about 1/16". You can see that here. I turned the threads off about 3/4" of the back end of the shaft and knurled it for easy adjustment. I haven't used it yet but will probably do so tonight or tomorrow night to make my pins.

    Here are two other accessories I made: a DI holder and a milling table.



    The DI holder that came with my SB was a really lousy design. The clamp piece had flats on both ends so it only worked correctly if it was perfectly matched to the ways. But it wasn't and no ammount of shimming seemed to help. It also had the DI mounting hole on the bottom, clamp piece instead of on the top piece that was aligned to the way. This allowed it to move about/rotate and easily loose it's zero. I made this one from Fortal. The DI mounts in the top piece and the clamp is desiged to have no influence on the position of the top or the DI. The clamp rotates about a 1/4" piece of drill rod that rests in round slots in both parts. It is fixed in the clamp's slot with super glue. The contact surface of the clamp is NOT flat, but instead has about a 2" radius (hand filed) that allows it to contact the bottom or the way along a single line so it can not misalign the top and the DI. I cut it from a single piece of Fortal and drilled and reamed the 1/4" hole to form the round slots on the saw line before separating the two parts. This ensuered perfect alignment.

    Oh, the milling work on the DI holder was all done on the SB using the milling table which is also shown in this picture.

    The milling table is just a piece of 3/4" 1018 steel. It had a fairly flat mill finish and I did very little to improve it. I did do about 100 or 200 strokes on abrasive paper on a glass plate to take off any bumps or burrs. There are a lot of 3/8" tapped holes for using a clamp set. This is a lot more verastile than the usual milling vise for a lathe.

    Here you can see the bottom with the mounting button for the cross slide. It also has an optional 3/4" raising block on it which allows movement over the cross slide's crank for greater Y movements. Without the raising block I can mount bigger (taller) parts.

    Here's a bottom picture of the milling table:



    The button is mounted with 4 M5 SHCSs: I used that size because I have a large box of them on hand and I have to use them somewhere. Number 10 or 12 English size cap screws would also work just fine. IN the top side photo, you can see that there are three positions where the button can be mounted for more versatility.

    This combined drawing shows a bit over 1/4 of the table and the mounting button:



    I have more pictures, but it is past 2 AM again, so later.

  14. #134
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    Very nice work, Paul! I'm glad that you took the time to post, since I am planning to add a collet stop to my lathe also, and you gave me some good ideas. The milling fixture is quite clever!

    Paula

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    Glad you liked it. Here's some more:

    First, a shot of the milling table from the previous post in action doing a line bore. I used this setup to insure the bore was parallel to the sides. I must have spent an hour or more setting it up.



    Here's a fly cutter for use with the milling table:



    Here is an unusual accessory. I was using the milling table and an end mill to face the edges of some 1/2" aluminum. I wanted square edges, parallel to each other on opposite sides, and a nice finish. I was getting the first two, but the finish left a lot to be desired. So I made this larger handle that fits over the original SB crank so nothing has to be removed.



    Ignore the TV remote, I was in a hurry and I needed something to prop it up for a better view. Here it is installed:



    It is held on by a set screw you can see in both pictures. The crank is made from a carriage bolt and a gutter spacer that had the misfortune to be laying around. This allows free rotation. As you can see, I drilled three holes for it but I found the middle one was best. I plan to get and mount a better crank sometime and perhaps make a nicer overall handle, but this one works just fine for now. It allows me to feed much more constantly and that translated to a much better finish.

    Here is a shot showing the difference it made:



    The edge on the right was with the original handle. The one on the left is with the large radius handle. The difference in the finish is unbelievable. Absolutely nothing different except the handle and the smoothness of the feed. I would highly recommend this for anyone doing milling on the lathe and it is even good for facing cuts when turning. A better design would allow the dial to be more visible while using it and that would make it more acceptable for all turning operations.

    No wonder people like CNC.

    I have more, but I need to take more pictures,

  16. #136
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    That's a great idea for a milling table Paul. I may unceremoniously steal that idea for myself if you have no objections I like the way it just slides in to the cross slide.

    Pete

  17. #137
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    This Pete like it also! That's one slick idea and I think I will shamelessly borrow from it!



    Pete

  18. #138
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    EPAIII

    What is the story behind your chuck backing plate. What divisions can you get off that?

    Nice work !
    Don

  19. #139
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    I've been thinking about a DI stop that's been on ebay for a while, I keep wondering if it's too expensive (including postage to the UK) although cheaper than I've seen a micrometer stop go for. I keep thinking "I could make that". Now I'm convinced I can - thanks!

    I also like the milling table because I'll need to make one to make the clamp for the stop. I had been trying to decide between something with a T-bolt fitting for the compound or making up a wedge button to fit directly to the cross slide - now I'm also convinced I can manage the latter - hooray!

    This all may be some time down the line because I don't even have a collet system yet, but I think I have been convinced I can make or finish a chuck for ER collets. I'm going to have a lot for this thread eventually!

    I really must try to get round to sorting out the photos for the little bits I've done so far to put here.

    Jim

  20. #140
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    Very clever to make the circumference of the tool path equal to one foot.


    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post

    Here's a fly cutter for use with the milling table:




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