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    Kearns 'S' Type Horizontal Boring Machine

    I’ve taken the liberty of copying this photo is from Famous for a Century by Curtis Sparkes, 2008. He worked for Kearns for 50 years, and became the managing Director. The photo shows six S-type Kearns machines on a Leyland truck. The buildings in the background were painted in an effort to...
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    An excellent maritime museum

    Tyrone, I don’t suppose the bosses were too worried about gears injuring their workers, but you’d think they’d put guards on to protect the gear teeth. Drive belts were the real killers. When I started at AEI Trafford Park, there was an enormous Shanks lathe, probably 18 ft swing with length...
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    Lineshaft Machine Shop Photos

    I was trying to find pictures of a large lathe supplied by J. Whitworth & Co in 1880 to the Saint-Chamond steelworks in France for turning 100-ton gun barrels. I didn’t find any, but I did find the amazing picture above. At least four lathes being used to bore some of the 9 principal holes in...
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    For interest - How were fly-presses made ?

    From The Cabinet Cyclopaedia by Dionysius Lardner, 1833. Methods of making large female-threaded nuts and sleeves in the olden days:- ‘The most ancient is probably that adopted by whitesmiths in general in the making of vices. The course is this:- The screw A (fig 49) being finished, and a...
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    For interest - How were fly-presses made ?

    99Panhard’s post has got me thinking, or rather looking. I’ve found something about wrapped threads, and will post it later. Regarding the introduction of fly presses, one source provides a date of c.1530, when Benvenuto Cellini was striking some medals using a screw press with a lever 13 ft...
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    Lineshaft Machine Shop Photos

    Thanks, Jim. It didn't take long to find a real gem. I hope this is the link:- https://catalog.archives.gov/id/45516336 Machining a very long liner for a 14" gun. If you click on 'download full size image' you get a remarkably high resolution photo. It's like going back 104 years.
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    Lineshaft Machine Shop Photos

    1. What on earth are they doing to that ingot in enginebill's photo? (Post #160). I know the top and bottom of ingots have to be discarded before forging, but they’re obviously not going to part the ends off in the lathe. Some aspects of the lathe seemed familiar. I’m thinking J. Whitworth &...
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    For interest - How were fly-presses made ?

    Yes, the fine thread is for a travel stop.
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    An excellent maritime museum

    Jim, Thanks. Here’s a photo of a different model of Shanks H&V planer in action at the works of Walker Bros of Wigan. Seems to be a long way round just to face the end of a flywheel hub. Of course, in a busy machine shop you had to use the machines that happened to be available at the time...
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    An excellent maritime museum

    I've been encouraged to post more pictures of stuff at this museum. Not this many photos, though. I intended to attach thumbnails only, not full-sized. The Shanks horizontal & vertical planer was probably more capable and more versatile than it looks. The message on the plate (2nd photo) is...
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    An excellent maritime museum

    I don't know how you do it, Jim! Yes, it's a Horizontal & Vertical Planer. It was made by Thomas Shanks & Co, and came from the Clyde Navigation Trust's workshops in Renfrew.
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    An excellent maritime museum

    Scottish Maritime Museum, Irvine. The main exhibition area is in the former marine engine workshop of Alex Stephen & Co of Linthouse, Glasgow. Linthouse, note not Irvine. The old building was dismantled and re-erected 20 miles away at Irvine to house the museum. Inside there’s a well-chosen...
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    The DoALL Company

    OLD THREAD WARNING! Google brought me to this thread. I’d just visited the small town of Chard, in Somerset, (England). A fading sign proclaims Chard as ‘The birthplace of powered flight’ ! John Stringfellow, and inventor and maker of textile machinery parts, and William Samuel Henson, a...
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    A question about early Automotive bearings...

    A quick search on early automotive engine bearings revealed not very much. In 1909/10, Vauxhall and Sunbeam, who at that time catered for the needs of rich sporting gentlemen, favoured white metal bearings. Now, 'white metal' here is Babbitt there, containing a great deal (around 90%) of...
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    OT: Limy Sami medical update

    Sir Peter Mansfield, Godfrey Hounsfield, and the Nobel Prize Committee might think differently. Oh, and Micheal Haughton, Peter Ratcliffe, John Gurdon, Robert G. Edwards, J. E. Suiston, Paul Nurse, Tim Hunt, ......
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    Fullagar---the ship and the engine

    More information on the ship Fullagar: In December 1920 it was reported that ‘The vessel in question has now been in service for over six months, and the engine has run without any defects appearing.’ However in 1921 the Cammellaird-Fullagar engine was replaced by a Beardmore diesel engine...
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    Fullagar---the ship and the engine

    1 2 3 I must admit that I hadn’t looked into the workings of the Fullagar engine, thinking it was complicated. I was wrong. It’s ingenious, and simple compared with other opposed two-stroke engines like the Junkers, Doxford, Deltic, and others. The simplicity comes from using the crosshead of...
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    Fullagar---the ship and the engine

    No need for a ladder when there's a handy church tower! I took this photo in 2011. The empty drydock has accommodated a lot of vessels since the CSS Alabama was fitted out there. On the opposite side of the River Mersey was the big Mersey Forge, where Ericsson's 12" gun for the USS...
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    Fullagar---the ship and the engine

    Mark's factory is still there - for the moment. Cammell Laird's yard at Birkenhead is also still going. At least it was in February when I took this photo showing part of what is probably an original workshop wall from the 1850s. A 'Grey Funnel Line' vessel was in drydock.
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