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1700 degrees F hot enough for A2 Heat Treatment?

NikL

Plastic
Joined
Jun 7, 2022
Looking for guidance. I am making some punch dies and want to make them with A2. My trouble is my kiln only reaches 1700 degrees F. Every heat treatment protocol I’ve read says to bring the part to a minimum of 1725 or 1750. Will 1700 degrees be hot enough? Thank you advance.
 

rogertoolmaker

Cast Iron
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Looking for guidance. I am making some punch dies and want to make them with A2. My trouble is my kiln only reaches 1700 degrees F. Every heat treatment protocol I’ve read says to bring the part to a minimum of 1725 or 1750. Will 1700 degrees be hot enough? Thank you advance.
 

rogertoolmaker

Cast Iron
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
A2 Slowly heat to 1450F, then raise to 1750F and hold. Then set aside to cool. Change to O1 tool steel? Hardens at 1450F. Temper to 60-62Rc. 425F.
Roger
 

steve-l

Titanium
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Location
Geilenkirchen, Germany
Looking for guidance. I am making some punch dies and want to make them with A2. My trouble is my kiln only reaches 1700 degrees F. Every heat treatment protocol I’ve read says to bring the part to a minimum of 1725 or 1750. Will 1700 degrees be hot enough? Thank you advance.
I have a real problem with questions like this. This forum is not a personal library for those too lazy to do just a little research themselves. Google is your friend! Please read the rules and show a little respect for your fellow members time.
 

rat_stomper

Plastic
Joined
Mar 7, 2017
good god he didn't ask for the heat treatment procedure, he asked if 1700F was close enough.

I don't have enough experience to give a good answer, but my gut says no simply because it's out of spec.
 

fciron

Stainless
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Location
Louisville, KY, USA
50 degrees below hardening temperature is still below hardening temperature.

You’re going to put money, time and effort into the dies. Find a few bucks and send them out for proper heat treatment.
 

implmex

Titanium
Joined
Jun 23, 2002
Location
Vancouver BC Canada
Hi NikL:
You have to judge whether the work you put into the dies before you harden them is worth risking.
For a die that is to go to a customer, probably no.
For a die that will punch a few parts for your hobby project, probably yes.
For a complex progressive die, probably no.
For a die to punch a brass washer, probably yes.
You get the picture.

If this is an undemanding application, you can try to harden a sample and see if it gets hard enough for your job.
For anything where you believe you need the best performance from the steel, I'd do as fciron recommends and spring for the cost of having it professionally heat treated.
You will have to decide which category your project falls into.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 

NikL

Plastic
Joined
Jun 7, 2022
50 degrees below hardening temperature is still below hardening temperature.

You’re going to put money, time and effort into the dies. Find a few bucks and send them out for proper heat treatment.
Thank you for the input, will do
 

NikL

Plastic
Joined
Jun 7, 2022
Can you tweak your kiln to get a bit hotter? Is the 1700 limit the controller or power/constuction capacity? Add more insulation, heat up the room....
I reached out to the manufacturer to get a different controller but they wouldn't send me one do to liability of the kiln not being rated for above 1700. Thanks for the input.
 

NikL

Plastic
Joined
Jun 7, 2022
Hi NikL:
You have to judge whether the work you put into the dies before you harden them is worth risking.
For a die that is to go to a customer, probably no.
For a die that will punch a few parts for your hobby project, probably yes.
For a complex progressive die, probably no.
For a die to punch a brass washer, probably yes.
You get the picture.

If this is an undemanding application, you can try to harden a sample and see if it gets hard enough for your job.
For anything where you believe you need the best performance from the steel, I'd do as fciron recommends and spring for the cost of having it professionally heat treated.
You will have to decide which category your project falls into.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
Sound advice, Thank you for the input. I will outsource the heat treatment.
 








 
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