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1945 American Pacemaker 16x54 toolroom model lathe disassembly project

SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Folks,

Have the tailstock all figured out thanks to great info from you folks.

Pulling the apron off is next on the list. I have the end support bracket off and the feed rod pulled out. Next working on the feed screw and it has me stumped. I have removed the tapered pin by the quick change gearbox. I have loosed what appear to be 2 collars possible used to adjust end play or bearing preload but for the life of me I cannot figure out how to pull the feed screw off the machine. I believe there is a stub that goes into the gear box and the feed screw shaft fits into the sleeve and is pinned in place but I cannot figure out how to separate the two. Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. I am looking at bulletin 20 but am not seeing a solution. I also need to remove the other two rods, the clutch rod and the lead screw reverse lever and am scratching my head on those as well. I am guessing I have to remove some stuff off the end of those in the gearbox under the large cover. I am just being careful to not smack things to get them apart for fear of breaking something.

Also have question about the chasing dial as the bolt that holds it to the apron just spins around so I cannot remove the nut to take it off the apron. Threads are a bit munged on the end of the stuff the dial is on but the fact that the entire stuff is turning is a bit worrying.

Pictures are attached. First one show lead screw with taper pin out and collars loose, 2nd picture different angle. 3rd and 4th pictures are of chasing dial. My guess is the worm gear and stuff hanging off of it are not standard and there should be a simple cap bolt in its place.

Thanks

--sean
 

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tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Folks,

Have the tailstock all figured out thanks to great info from you folks.

Pulling the apron off is next on the list. I have the end support bracket off and the feed rod pulled out. Next working on the feed screw and it has me stumped. I have removed the tapered pin by the quick change gearbox. I have loosed what appear to be 2 collars possible used to adjust end play or bearing preload but for the life of me I cannot figure out how to pull the feed screw off the machine. I believe there is a stub that goes into the gear box and the feed screw shaft fits into the sleeve and is pinned in place but I cannot figure out how to separate the two. Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. I am looking at bulletin 20 but am not seeing a solution. I also need to remove the other two rods, the clutch rod and the lead screw reverse lever and am scratching my head on those as well. I am guessing I have to remove some stuff off the end of those in the gearbox under the large cover. I am just being careful to not smack things to get them apart for fear of breaking something.

Also have question about the chasing dial as the bolt that holds it to the apron just spins around so I cannot remove the nut to take it off the apron. Threads are a bit munged on the end of the stuff the dial is on but the fact that the entire stuff is turning is a bit worrying.

Pictures are attached. First one show lead screw with taper pin out and collars loose, 2nd picture different angle. 3rd and 4th pictures are of chasing dial. My guess is the worm gear and stuff hanging off of it are not standard and there should be a simple cap bolt in its place.

Thanks

--sean
Both the feed rod and leadscrew are held by pins - a taper pin on the feed rod and a shear pin on the lead screw. To pull the leadscrew out of its socket (and assuming the end bracket is fully off) you should be able to simply engage the half nuts and crank towards the tailstock end. You might have to give the socket end a light tap with a brass mallet and same with the feed rod. This should pull the leadscrew out.

To get the feed rod out after the taper pins are out, there should be two collars – one in front of the apron and one in back of the apron. These are used as kick-out stops for the apron feed. Set the back one and tighten it down and crank the carriage towards the tailstock and it should pull it out.

To get the square control rod out, there is a large taper pin in the bottom of the quadrant box that must come out first. This pin is difficult to access. You can remove the whole casting assembly by knocking out the two taper pins and four bolts that hold it and slide the whole mechanism and the feed rod out towards the headstock.

I’m not sure if you are aware, but the apron is located by an allen-headed taper pin. You must pull this pin first and then the bolts. The whole apron sits on a shelf and you have to cock the apron a little to get it off the shelf and the cross-feed gear to clear. This is of course a heavy item. Make sure you’re rigged up on it – not just trying to manhandle it.

Also where the lead screw goes into the feedbox, there is a blind taper pin that is tapped and threaded for a puller. Don’t disturb this unless you plan to remove the feedbox. This taper pin locates the outer spacer between two angular contact bearings and a dog clutch on the end. When these parts are disturbed or pulled, they can change the location of the outer spacer slightly which loads up one side of the angular bearing or the other and you will end up with slack. I won’t go further into this unless you get this far.

The Pacemaker apron and feedbox would be high on my list for disassembly as both are open to dirt and contamination and the feedbox has many felts and pipe cleaners that need to be flushed and cleaned.

Make sure you have a plan on how you are going to handle these heavy but delicate assemblies.
 

SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Both the feed rod and leadscrew are held by pins - a taper pin on the feed rod and a shear pin on the lead screw. To pull the leadscrew out of its socket (and assuming the end bracket is fully off) you should be able to simply engage the half nuts and crank towards the tailstock end. You might have to give the socket end a light tap with a brass mallet and same with the feed rod. This should pull the leadscrew out.

To get the feed rod out after the taper pins are out, there should be two collars – one in front of the apron and one in back of the apron. These are used as kick-out stops for the apron feed. Set the back one and tighten it down and crank the carriage towards the tailstock and it should pull it out.

To get the square control rod out, there is a large taper pin in the bottom of the quadrant box that must come out first. This pin is difficult to access. You can remove the whole casting assembly by knocking out the two taper pins and four bolts that hold it and slide the whole mechanism and the feed rod out towards the headstock.

I’m not sure if you are aware, but the apron is located by an allen-headed taper pin. You must pull this pin first and then the bolts. The whole apron sits on a shelf and you have to cock the apron a little to get it off the shelf and the cross-feed gear to clear. This is of course a heavy item. Make sure you’re rigged up on it – not just trying to manhandle it.

Also where the lead screw goes into the feedbox, there is a blind taper pin that is tapped and threaded for a puller. Don’t disturb this unless you plan to remove the feedbox. This taper pin locates the outer spacer between two angular contact bearings and a dog clutch on the end. When these parts are disturbed or pulled, they can change the location of the outer spacer slightly which loads up one side of the angular bearing or the other and you will end up with slack. I won’t go further into this unless you get this far.

The Pacemaker apron and feedbox would be high on my list for disassembly as both are open to dirt and contamination and the feedbox has many felts and pipe cleaners that need to be flushed and cleaned.

Make sure you have a plan on how you are going to handle these heavy but delicate assemblies.
tailstock4 thanks once again for the excellent information.

Question on the instructions for the square control rod. Which casting are you referring to in this sentence? "You can remove the whole casting assembly by knocking out the two taper pins and four bolts that hold it and slide the whole mechanism and the feed rod out towards the headstock."

It also sounds like I need to remove apron before removing the carriage? Is that allen head taper pin location obvious on the apron? I will definitely rig it up to the gantry crane.

Also I am definitely planning on taking off the feedbox, which I am assuming is also referred to as the quick change gearbox? This lathe has not been cleaned in a very very long time and is full of chips, old gummy oil and who knows what else. The only way to really clean it up, inspect, and paint it is to take it apart. There was a lot of oil and chips in behind the gearbox, not sure if the large quantity of oil is suppose to be there or it indicates a leak from somewhere else.

This also gives me a good education on how the whole thing works and goes together.

As always I appreciate your help.

--sean
 

tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
tailstock4 thanks once again for the excellent information.

Question on the instructions for the square control rod. Which casting are you referring to in this sentence? "You can remove the whole casting assembly by knocking out the two taper pins and four bolts that hold it and slide the whole mechanism and the feed rod out towards the headstock."

It also sounds like I need to remove apron before removing the carriage? Is that allen head taper pin location obvious on the apron? I will definitely rig it up to the gantry crane.

Also I am definitely planning on taking off the feedbox, which I am assuming is also referred to as the quick change gearbox? This lathe has not been cleaned in a very very long time and is full of chips, old gummy oil and who knows what else. The only way to really clean it up, inspect, and paint it is to take it apart. There was a lot of oil and chips in behind the gearbox, not sure if the large quantity of oil is suppose to be there or it indicates a leak from somewhere else.

This also gives me a good education on how the whole thing works and goes together.

As always I appreciate your help.

--sean
Regarding which casting I was referring to in the “knocking out the two taper pins…” statement. The casting I’m referring to is the one that the clutch linkage connects to and it is spring loaded. If you disconnect the linkage and remove the taper pins and the bolts, you can remove the whole assembly including the clutch rod. But remember to remove the two taper pins first before you loosen the bolts.

The apron separates from the saddle first. The allen-head taper pin I’m referring to is on top of the saddle. There are what appears to be five allen-head socket screws on the left side of the cross slide. The middle one of the set of three is really a blind tapered pin and should be removed first. You remove this pin by getting it to move back and forth while pulling up on an allen wrench. If it has been there a really long time, you may have to use penetrating oil.

Yes, the feedbox is also referred to as the quick change gearbox.

When the lathe is moved, if the tailstock end is lifted high, oil will run out of the headstock into the clutch casting cavity where leaks out when tilted. Also remember that the quick change gear box, the apron and saddle are complete oil loss systems. The very bottom of the base casting is a reservoir with a drain plug for this lost oil. One thing I’m sure off, there is no such thing as a non-leaking Pacemaker. It just wasn’t something they were concerned about.
 

Kirt

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 21, 2005
Location
Tennessee
Folks,

Have the tailstock all figured out thanks to great info from you folks.

Pulling the apron off is next on the list. I have the end support bracket off and the feed rod pulled out. Next working on the feed screw and it has me stumped. I have removed the tapered pin by the quick change gearbox. I have loosed what appear to be 2 collars possible used to adjust end play or bearing preload but for the life of me I cannot figure out how to pull the feed screw off the machine. I believe there is a stub that goes into the gear box and the feed screw shaft fits into the sleeve and is pinned in place but I cannot figure out how to separate the two. Any words of wisdom would be appreciated. I am looking at bulletin 20 but am not seeing a solution. I also need to remove the other two rods, the clutch rod and the lead screw reverse lever and am scratching my head on those as well. I am guessing I have to remove some stuff off the end of those in the gearbox under the large cover. I am just being careful to not smack things to get them apart for fear of breaking something.

Also have question about the chasing dial as the bolt that holds it to the apron just spins around so I cannot remove the nut to take it off the apron. Threads are a bit munged on the end of the stuff the dial is on but the fact that the entire stuff is turning is a bit worrying.

Pictures are attached. First one show lead screw with taper pin out and collars loose, 2nd picture different angle. 3rd and 4th pictures are of chasing dial. My guess is the worm gear and stuff hanging off of it are not standard and there should be a simple cap bolt in its place.

Thanks

--sean
Regarding your thread chasing dial, there should be a cross pin through the casting that holds the stud in place. Look at the front of the casting just to the left of the mounting surface for the thread dial - you should see a pin head if there is not too much paint. Not sure if it is a taper pin or not, but based on the rest of the lathe, it probably is. My guess is that your pin has been sheared and let's the stud rotate.
 

SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Regarding your thread chasing dial, there should be a cross pin through the casting that holds the stud in place. Look at the front of the casting just to the left of the mounting surface for the thread dial - you should see a pin head if there is not too much paint. Not sure if it is a taper pin or not, but based on the rest of the lathe, it probably is. My guess is that your pin has been sheared and let's the stud rotate.
That was it, fun to get the broken pin out. Next task is to get pin that holds gear on shaft out. Not sure how that is suppose to work given the hooded nature of the chasing dial. May have to drill out, looks like straight pin and replace.
 
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SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Regarding which casting I was referring to in the “knocking out the two taper pins…” statement. The casting I’m referring to is the one that the clutch linkage connects to and it is spring loaded. If you disconnect the linkage and remove the taper pins and the bolts, you can remove the whole assembly including the clutch rod. But remember to remove the two taper pins first before you loosen the bolts.

The apron separates from the saddle first. The allen-head taper pin I’m referring to is on top of the saddle. There are what appears to be five allen-head socket screws on the left side of the cross slide. The middle one of the set of three is really a blind tapered pin and should be removed first. You remove this pin by getting it to move back and forth while pulling up on an allen wrench. If it has been there a really long time, you may have to use penetrating oil.

Yes, the feedbox is also referred to as the quick change gearbox.

When the lathe is moved, if the tailstock end is lifted high, oil will run out of the headstock into the clutch casting cavity where leaks out when tilted. Also remember that the quick change gear box, the apron and saddle are complete oil loss systems. The very bottom of the base casting is a reservoir with a drain plug for this lost oil. One thing I’m sure off, there is no such thing as a non-leaking Pacemaker. It just wasn’t something they were concerned about.

I am attaching some pictures of what I think you are referring to for the removal of the lead screw reverse shaft. How do you remove taper pins, first photo, if you don't have access to the opposite end? Vise grip and tap with hammer? And the linkage in the 2nd photo, do I remove the pin on the right lower side by the collars or the pin with the cotter key in the upper left? I found the allen bolts that secure the unit from below.

Follow up question on cross slide round unit in the first picture, how does that come off? I assume that has to come off to get cross slide screw out. I cannot find any taper pins or set screws. I want to be able to remove the cross slide screw as things are filthy. The parts drawing looks like the entire round unit is threaded into the cross slide base.

As always any pointers are most welcome.

Thanks.

--sean
 

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m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
If you remove the clutch linkage bar that the yellow arrow points to in the photo you can swing the square clutch bar farther back clockwise and get an angle to knock the pin out. This allows the square bar to slide out toward the tail stock.
To get the correct angle to drive the pin out look at the casting above the bar, out of view of the photo. That casting that looks like a tray and has an upward 45-degree angle on the left side. Your punch can follow down parallel along the outside of that 45-degree angle and knock the pin out. You may need a longer punch. I took a 1/4" socket extension and put the punch in the socket cavity on the end of the extension and drove the pin out.
If you haven't removed the clutch bar yet I'll get a photo in the morning showing the angle.
InkedIMG_2055_LI.jpg
 
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m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
I am attaching some pictures of what I think you are referring to for the removal of the lead screw reverse shaft. How do you remove taper pins, first photo, if you don't have access to the opposite end? Vise grip and tap with hammer? And the linkage in the 2nd photo, do I remove the pin on the right lower side by the collars or the pin with the cotter key in the upper left? I found the allen bolts that secure the unit from below.

Follow up question on cross slide round unit in the first picture, how does that come off? I assume that has to come off to get cross slide screw out. I cannot find any taper pins or set screws. I want to be able to remove the cross slide screw as things are filthy. The parts drawing looks like the entire round unit is threaded into the cross slide base.

As always any pointers are most welcome.

Thanks.

--sean20220828_073827.jpg


Ok this photo shows the angle of the punch to knock the pin out of the square bar. The crossbar clutch linkage has to be removed first. That punch is actually in the tapered pins hole.


20220828_073747.jpg
Here is another angle showing the punch in the pins hole. The square bar slid right out toward the tailstock. The tailstock end, shaft support bracket has to be removed of course.20220828_073827.jpg
20220828_073800.jpg
Sorry about the multi photos, Still getting use to new format
 

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m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
I am attaching some pictures of what I think you are referring to for the removal of the lead screw reverse shaft. How do you remove taper pins, first photo, if you don't have access to the opposite end? Vise grip and tap with hammer? And the linkage in the 2nd photo, do I remove the pin on the right lower side by the collars or the pin with the cotter key in the upper left? I found the allen bolts that secure the unit from below.

Follow up question on cross slide round unit in the first picture, how does that come off? I assume that has to come off to get cross slide screw out. I cannot find any taper pins or set screws. I want to be able to remove the cross slide screw as things are filthy. The parts drawing looks like the entire round unit is threaded into the cross slide base.

As always any pointers are most welcome.

Thanks.

--sean

20220828_073941.jpg
It should just unscrew from the crossfeed casting. You may need a strap wrench. Turn counterclockwise
 
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SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Ok this photo shows the angle of the punch to knock the pin out of the square bar. The crossbar clutch linkage has to be removed first. That punch is actually in the tapered pins hole.


View attachment 372748
Here is another angle showing the punch in the pins hole. The square bar slid right out toward the tailstock. The tailstock end, shaft support bracket has to be removed of course.View attachment 372747
View attachment 372753
Sorry about the multi photos, Still getting use to new format
Mike,

Worked like a charm was able to get the pin out, the only one so far that came out reasonably easy. Thanks again. The cleaning continues.
 

SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
Both the feed rod and leadscrew are held by pins - a taper pin on the feed rod and a shear pin on the lead screw. To pull the leadscrew out of its socket (and assuming the end bracket is fully off) you should be able to simply engage the half nuts and crank towards the tailstock end. You might have to give the socket end a light tap with a brass mallet and same with the feed rod. This should pull the leadscrew out.

To get the feed rod out after the taper pins are out, there should be two collars – one in front of the apron and one in back of the apron. These are used as kick-out stops for the apron feed. Set the back one and tighten it down and crank the carriage towards the tailstock and it should pull it out.

To get the square control rod out, there is a large taper pin in the bottom of the quadrant box that must come out first. This pin is difficult to access. You can remove the whole casting assembly by knocking out the two taper pins and four bolts that hold it and slide the whole mechanism and the feed rod out towards the headstock.

I’m not sure if you are aware, but the apron is located by an allen-headed taper pin. You must pull this pin first and then the bolts. The whole apron sits on a shelf and you have to cock the apron a little to get it off the shelf and the cross-feed gear to clear. This is of course a heavy item. Make sure you’re rigged up on it – not just trying to manhandle it.

Also where the lead screw goes into the feedbox, there is a blind taper pin that is tapped and threaded for a puller. Don’t disturb this unless you plan to remove the feedbox. This taper pin locates the outer spacer between two angular contact bearings and a dog clutch on the end. When these parts are disturbed or pulled, they can change the location of the outer spacer slightly which loads up one side of the angular bearing or the other and you will end up with slack. I won’t go further into this unless you get this far.

The Pacemaker apron and feedbox would be high on my list for disassembly as both are open to dirt and contamination and the feedbox has many felts and pipe cleaners that need to be flushed and cleaned.

Make sure you have a plan on how you are going to handle these heavy but delicate assemblies.
tailstock4 I am planning on removing the feedbox. Any additional pointers would be much appreciated. I have attached a photo of the area I think you are warning me about the blind tapered pin? If you could provide a picture of the blind pin that would be great. When you say threaded for a puller are you referring to something like a slide hammer puller? The accumulated crud is amazing.

Thanks.
 

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tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
tailstock4 I am planning on removing the feedbox. Any additional pointers would be much appreciated. I have attached a photo of the area I think you are warning me about the blind tapered pin? If you could provide a picture of the blind pin that would be great. When you say threaded for a puller are you referring to something like a slide hammer puller? The accumulated crud is amazing.

Thanks.
The blind taper pin I was referring to is in the first picture. As mentioned, it holds the outer spacer of the angular contact bearings. If you pulled this pin when you were trying to get the lead screw out, you may have created misalignment of the bearing or the spacer which could have made reinstallation difficult.

Also, the second picture is of the end plugs. These all must be removed when you get to the disassembly of the feedbox to gain access to the various shafts.

On the back side of the feedbox, there is a plate with several taper-headed screws in it. Behind this plate is a reservoir for all the different oil passages. There are quite a few. Each one has a pipe cleaner that is of a specific length for that tube. Shorter ones deliver oil quicker than the longer ones. I tried to duplicate the type and length of these cleaners. They work a little like a crude meter valve. Each copper tube goes to a bearing or set of bearings where it’s brad riveted to the casting, cut to an angle and taper, then the end of the tube is bent over to the race of the bearing. This allows the oil to drip to the races of the bearing. There are quite a few of these.

As far as getting the feedbox off the lathe, I use a forklift under the feedbox and then slid it off onto the forks.

I’ve also included some pictures of wrenches I made for the Pacemaker. The large one is a L-1 for the spindle. The other is of a spanner wrench that is needed to adjust the clutch for the spindle. (There is a picture of what I am talking about.) Another is an L-0 spanner wrench for the Rivett spindle. I included a picture of it because I like my design and if I were to make any more, this is the design I would use. It can be held captive on the nut (meaning no risk of dropping it), or it can be used without engaging it fully and using one lug as a conventional spanner. The next to the last picture is the wrench disengaged only using one lug. The last picture is the wrench fully engaged - meaning the wrench is captive.

IMG_0543.jpg IMG_0549.jpg IMG_0545.jpg IMG_0544.jpg IMG_0550.jpg IMG_0546.jpg IMG_0551.jpg IMG_0552.jpg
 

m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
The blind taper pin I was referring to is in the first picture. As mentioned, it holds the outer spacer of the angular contact bearings. If you pulled this pin when you were trying to get the lead screw out, you may have created misalignment of the bearing or the spacer which could have made reinstallation difficult.

Also, the second picture is of the end plugs. These all must be removed when you get to the disassembly of the feedbox to gain access to the various shafts.

On the back side of the feedbox, there is a plate with several taper-headed screws in it. Behind this plate is a reservoir for all the different oil passages. There are quite a few. Each one has a pipe cleaner that is of a specific length for that tube. Shorter ones deliver oil quicker than the longer ones. I tried to duplicate the type and length of these cleaners. They work a little like a crude meter valve. Each copper tube goes to a bearing or set of bearings where it’s brad riveted to the casting, cut to an angle and taper, then the end of the tube is bent over to the race of the bearing. This allows the oil to drip to the races of the bearing. There are quite a few of these.

As far as getting the feedbox off the lathe, I use a forklift under the feedbox and then slid it off onto the forks.

I’ve also included some pictures of wrenches I made for the Pacemaker. The large one is a L-1 for the spindle. The other is of a spanner wrench that is needed to adjust the clutch for the spindle. (There is a picture of what I am talking about.) Another is an L-0 spanner wrench for the Rivett spindle. I included a picture of it because I like my design and if I were to make any more, this is the design I would use. It can be held captive on the nut (meaning no risk of dropping it), or it can be used without engaging it fully and using one lug as a conventional spanner. The next to the last picture is the wrench disengaged only using one lug. The last picture is the wrench fully engaged - meaning the wrench is captive.

View attachment 372798 View attachment 372802 View attachment 372805 View attachment 372806 View attachment 372807 View attachment 372808 View attachment 372810 View attachment 372809
Tailstock4
I like your spanner wrench design's. Especially the three-point L-0 wrench for the Rivett.
The clutch adjusting is also nice. Cool handle!
The wide jaw on the L-1 spindle wrench gets full width contact with the spindle nut. Thats something not found on other -L - spanner designs.
All well thought out designs.
 

SeanShanny

Plastic
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Location
Shaftsbury, Vermont
The blind taper pin I was referring to is in the first picture. As mentioned, it holds the outer spacer of the angular contact bearings. If you pulled this pin when you were trying to get the lead screw out, you may have created misalignment of the bearing or the spacer which could have made reinstallation difficult.

Also, the second picture is of the end plugs. These all must be removed when you get to the disassembly of the feedbox to gain access to the various shafts.

On the back side of the feedbox, there is a plate with several taper-headed screws in it. Behind this plate is a reservoir for all the different oil passages. There are quite a few. Each one has a pipe cleaner that is of a specific length for that tube. Shorter ones deliver oil quicker than the longer ones. I tried to duplicate the type and length of these cleaners. They work a little like a crude meter valve. Each copper tube goes to a bearing or set of bearings where it’s brad riveted to the casting, cut to an angle and taper, then the end of the tube is bent over to the race of the bearing. This allows the oil to drip to the races of the bearing. There are quite a few of these.

As far as getting the feedbox off the lathe, I use a forklift under the feedbox and then slid it off onto the forks.

I’ve also included some pictures of wrenches I made for the Pacemaker. The large one is a L-1 for the spindle. The other is of a spanner wrench that is needed to adjust the clutch for the spindle. (There is a picture of what I am talking about.) Another is an L-0 spanner wrench for the Rivett spindle. I included a picture of it because I like my design and if I were to make any more, this is the design I would use. It can be held captive on the nut (meaning no risk of dropping it), or it can be used without engaging it fully and using one lug as a conventional spanner. The next to the last picture is the wrench disengaged only using one lug. The last picture is the wrench fully engaged - meaning the wrench is captive.

View attachment 372798 View attachment 372802 View attachment 372805 View attachment 372806 View attachment 372807 View attachment 372808 View attachment 372810 View attachment 372809
tailstock4 I have attached a picture of the pin on my machine you pointed out in your first picture. Do I need to remove that to take off the feedbox? If so how do I go about doing that? Absolutely beautiful machine by the way. Any chance you would manufacture any more wrenches to sell, I could certainly use them. As alway thank you for your help.
 

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tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Tailstock4
I like your spanner wrench design's. Especially the three-point L-0 wrench for the Rivett.
The clutch adjusting is also nice. Cool handle!
The wide jaw on the L-1 spindle wrench gets full width contact with the spindle nut. Thats something not found on other -L - spanner designs.
All well thought out designs.
Thanks, Mike. I’m thinking about posting these pictures in the antique forum since the L spindle nose taper is sort of old school. Maybe someone would have an interest in the designs. What do you think?
 

tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
tailstock4 I have attached a picture of the pin on my machine you pointed out in your first picture. Do I need to remove that to take off the feedbox? If so how do I go about doing that? Absolutely beautiful machine by the way. Any chance you would manufacture any more wrenches to sell, I could certainly use them. As alway thank you for your help.
No, you don’t have to remove that pin to remove the feedbox. I was just trying to save you some trouble if you were not going to remove the feedbox.

I hadn’t thought about manufacturing any, but I have the patterns which I would share. And I’m thinking about making this a separate post.
 








 
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