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1952 Southbend 9A Restoration

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Junction Box Upgrade

My idea is to keep all of the wiring interconnects within the existing OEM junction box attached to the motor casing. I thought it would be better to have several components coming in and out of that box in the back of the lathe versus having multiple connections going into the drum-switch on the front of the lathe. In the end, I wished I had gone with something bigger as it is a really tight squeeze in there.

Unfortunately my j-box is missing a second 1/2" knockout for a cable connection. In the past I would have drilled this hole out but every time I try to drill a larger hole in sheet metal all heck breaks loose. It is not one of my favorite things to do.

So this time I tried something new for me: a wrench-driven knockout punch. Perhaps this is like the most obvious way to do this but I didn't know!

1 box hole punch 1.jpg


The punch assembly is off to the left there, with the j-box in the center scribed and center-punched for drilling the pilot hole.

2 box hole punch 2.jpg


Drilling the small pilot hole was no issue - it's the larger holes that suck in sheet metal. I threw the box in a small vise and leveled it up prior to poking the hole.

3 box hole punch 3.jpg


Assembling the punch tool through the pilot hole was very easy. I held the whole thing in a vise as I assumed the torque requirements were going to be high to get the hole punched. Turns out the wrench made short work of the hole and there was very little resistance.

4 box hole punch 4.jpg


Good and easy result. I'll be using this tool many times going forward.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Wiring Harness

Next up was filling up that j-box with all the conductors I need per my wiring diagram (see my earlier post). My motor and wiring diagram contemplates specific wires having specific colors. To ensure there was minimal confusion I bought and used the same color wires for each individual line. I used the black, white, and green standard for the line and ground connections. Every conductor I purchased was 14 ga copper stranded.

I attached the flexible conduit to the j-box with a water-tight gland and then pulled the conductors through. I then crimped on a through-hole lug to each conductor along with some heat-shrink to protect the connection. I used blue heat-shrink for motor control wiring, yellow heat-shrink for incoming mains, and red heat-shrink for drum-switch mains.

1 harness 2.jpg


I used small barrier blocks to make the interconnects. This is where things got very crowded in the j-box. As I had not wired the motor in yet, I started only with the line and ground connections.

2 harness 4.jpg


Next step was to wire up the drum-switch. With all of the color coded leads entering the switch body and a detailed wiring diagram this was very straightforward and easy.

3 harness 6.jpg


As a gut check I studied the mechanical operation of the drum-switch against my wiring diagram and the motor wiring drawing and everything matched up in both forward (CW) and reverse (CCW) modes.


4 harness 7.jpg

5 harness 8.jpg


Next up is wiring the motor leads into the harness.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Motor Wiring

Now that the harness was complete it is time to install it onto the machine and wire the motor leads in.

With all the prep work I did with the wiring diagram and conductor coloring this was really easy. It went so quickly that I just assumed there was a mistake somewhere. I haven't found it yet :)

1 motor wiring 1.jpg


2 motor wiring 2.jpg


After pulling the motor leads in and attaching the j-box onto the motor it was time to outfit the wiring with lugs. I used the same exact assembly and color coding as the other leads. The lugs easily screwed down to the barrier strips. I had hoped to secure the barrier strips to the bottom of the j-box but there was just no room. I ended up wrapping each barrier strip with electrical tape and stuffing them inside the box with a secured lid.

3 motor wiring 3.jpg


4 motor wiring 4.jpg
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Drum Switch Preparation

The last item to take care of is the switch enclosure and mounting onto the machine.

My original intention was to use a vintage Furnas that was purpose built for a SB lathe. I found one on eBay and planned on restoring it alongside the lathe.

1 old switch 1.jpg


The inside of the switch wasn't too great, though. A lot of pitting / arc-ing on the contacts and the mechanism was not smooth. Honestly I love the look of the old switch, I really do, but I'd rather have a dependable, safe switch than one that tickles my fancy.

2 old switch 2.jpg


I decided I would use a brand-new switch in place of the Furnas. I picked McMaster-Carr no. #7065K21 which is a pretty standard replacement unit and has the same footprint and basic volumetrics as the OEM switch. To maintain the OEM look I removed the drum cover and face-plate to paint to match the machine. I also carefully removed the switch name-plate and re-attached it afterwards with M3 screws and nuts. Hated be-smirching my imperial machine with metric fasteners but that was the smallest I had on hand.

3 barrel painting 2.jpg

4 barrel painting 1.jpg


One really neat surprising thing I discovered is that the modern Furnas switch design shares many elements with the vintage design. So much so, in fact, that the cheesy red plastic handle uses the same fastening system as the old steel shaft and bake-light knob. I think it looks pretty good on the new switch and brings back some of that old character. It also feels 100% better in the hand than the plastic piece.

5 switch assembly 1.jpg

Next up the final step of mounting the switch on the machine.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Drum Switch Installation

My original intention was to mount the drum-switch on the OEM bracket that attaches to the left headstock safety guard. I sourced one of these brackets and restored it alongside the rest of the machine components and parts.

1 switch plate 1.jpg


Unfortunately, unless I am working with the incorrect parts, the mounting holes on the bracket forced the switch to be mounted upside down.

2 switch on plate 1.jpg


Now, this isn't a show stopper. I figured I could fabricate up an adapter to rotate the switch into its intended operation. Before stepping up to making this bracket out of steel or nylon I took my Fusion360 files and 3D printed it out. I added labels to each side of the print to ensure I oriented the adapter properly onto the bracket.

3 switch 3d print 2.jpg

4 switch 3d print 1.jpg


After all that futzing around, however, I felt that the bracket was a little ridiculous. I didn't want to add the additional height to what was already a big unit sitting above the guard and in the neighborhood of belt changes. I also found running the flexible conduit up to that location forced the conduit to either make big turns or get scarily close to moving parts.

Ultimately I changed courses and mounted the drum-switch on the ways in front of the headstock. My lathe had come with that switch bracket and, after a quick cleaning, re-tapping, and painting the assembly went together easily allowing the flex conduit to be routed underneath the ways. Seems like the best solution for me and puts the switch safely away from any moving parts.

5 switch installed 2.jpg


The motor started up and ran quietly and strongly in both directions on the first try. It took some belt alignment and tensioning to get everything running smoothly but we seem to be in business.

The electrical section of this build was something I was very anxious about and I am happy to report it went very smoothly. We are getting very close to getting this machine fully operational.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Chuck Restoration`

In preparation for my first cuts I took a break from the machine to restore a few chucks. I did a 4" 3-jaw, an 8" 3 jaw, and a 8" 4 jaw. Very straightforward once I figured out how they came apart. I screwed up on the first one in order of dis-assembly and ended up bending an alignment pin. McMaster-Carr solved that issue.

The chucks were pretty gross on the insides. A ton of old grease, cutting fluid, and swarf. The surfaces were undamaged tho so they cleaned up very nicely.

1 chuck pre-restoration.jpg

The one I show here is a SB original chuck. The other two are not.

2 chuck close-up.jpg


Dis-assembly went very smoothly on this one because it was the third one I did and I had worked out all the kinks.

3 chuck disassembled.jpg


Back together and ready to mount up onto the machine.

4 chuck complete.jpg
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Leveling the Machine I

The final thing I need to do before taking some cuts is to level up and align the machine. I really wasn't looking forward to this. The idea of going back and forth and moving shims around seemed really annoying (it was.)

First thing to take care of was the table. My concrete floor isn't perfect so all tables and machines need leveling for sure. A few wooden shims got the desk into a pretty level condition.

1 leveling table.jpg


I pulled out my treasured Starrett 98 to get the machine reasonably shimmed and leveled. The lines on the 98 are approximately 0.005" apart which, over 12", is pretty good.

2 initial leveling.jpg


For this machine I gave myself a little treat from eBay: a Starrett Master Precision Level. I believe this level's gradations are 0.0005" which is way better than is necessary or expected for what this machine will be up to but I have beginner's excitement (and many other machines to get leveled out).

3 master level in box.jpg


I finished up the shimming using the 199 and a lot of cursing and annoyance.

4 head end final.jpg


5 tail end final.jpg
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Leveling the Machine II

I have to be honest that I gave up a few times during the shimming. For a while I was just going in circles around the machine. I slowed down and started to use 0.002" shim stock and was able to really tune it in.

1 shims in place.jpg

Here is where I ended up on the headstock end of the machine:

2 head end final closeup.jpg


And the tailstock. Again, much better than I had hoped and WELL within the tolerance I was looking for.

3 tale end final closeup.jpg


Final step was a quick alignment of the tailstock. I do have a test bar from Edge Precision that I will be using but honestly I just didn't feel like it after shimming. I will get to it sometime in the near future. For the moment I used two live centers which I set point-to-point. The tailstock was actually pretty much dead on at the start.

4 aligning tail stock.jpg


Next up, CHIPS!
 

mattthemuppet

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Location
San Antonio
beautiful work Evan, she's going to be showroom quality by the time you're done. As for the switch, you could simply knock out the rivets holding the label in place, swap a couple of wires round and put the label back the right way up. Switch lever will be closer to hand too. Only downside I can see to the bed mount is that you'll limit how close to the headstock you can get the cutter. Probably not an issue with a chuck mounted, but might be if you're using collets.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Thanks, Matt! It's been a labor of love and really satisfying to see come together. I can't believe I didn't think of your switch solution - so basic. I'll see how it goes on the ways and then move it up top if I need the space.


beautiful work Evan, she's going to be showroom quality by the time you're done. As for the switch, you could simply knock out the rivets holding the label in place, swap a couple of wires round and put the label back the right way up. Switch lever will be closer to hand too. Only downside I can see to the bed mount is that you'll limit how close to the headstock you can get the cutter. Probably not an issue with a chuck mounted, but might be if you're using collets.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Complete

Well, she's substantially complete.

The last thing to do was to tool her up. I pulled out everything I had including the collet holder attachment and loaded her up. I didn't need to refinish that attachment as (a) it was already in great condition, and (b) I used it at the paint store to get the original match for the rest of the machine.

I also mounted the "Bostar" import tool post that came with the machine. I have an original swiss-made 40 position multifix but I am waiting for tool holders to be delivered from Pewe in Germany. I also have a bunch of original SB tool holders although I did pick up some carbide insert tooling as I'm not quite up to the task of grinding my own tools yet. Baby steps for me.

2 complete 2.jpg

1 complete 1.jpg


I'm pretty happy with how it is looking.
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
First Operations

With much nervousness it is time for my first chips!

I went through the lubrication chart and the entire machine ensuring to get all the wicks soaked and all the reservoirs full. Took a few minutes as I got comfortable with which oils went where. A few minor leaks as I filled it up but very little since, just a few drops. I also ran the machine and adjusted the back gear lash and the reverse gear lash for smooth running. I adjusted the clutch and ran the autofeed in both directions on the apron and the cross-slide. Finally I made an adjustment to the motor pulley to ensure good tracking on the countershaft.

I threaded on my 3-jaw and chucked up a piece of aluminum cut-off and mounted up a carbide tool-holder. After walking through getting the tool to the correct height (just slightly below centerline?) I went for it.

Here is the first facing operation:

1 facing operation.jpg


I didn't spend any time working out speeds & feeds on this because I don't have a great feel. I guessed 900 RPM which for my machine is the outer motor pulley (high range) and the second drive pulley.

Here is the first turning operation. Again, total guess on feed rates. It cut beautifully but the surface finish could be dialed in a little bit, although it's not as bad as it looks in the picture.

2 turning operation.jpg


Then it was time to make my first part. I needed an adapter to mount my digital camera onto a jointed Noga arm and magnetic base. I'd like to graduate from stills to video. Very basic part with two ODs, a threaded end, and some chamfers. Standard threads for small digital cameras is 1/4"-20 but the Noga is looking for a 8mm fit. I cut it out of brass which is common for camera adapters. Since it is my first rodeo I tapped it using a die. I had to shorten the handles of the die-holder on the bandsaw!

3 tapping.jpg


Here is the final part. I feel pretty good with it and it works great.

4 finished part 1.jpg


5 finished part 2.jpg
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Last Posting

Well, that pretty much wraps up this restoration thread. Thanks everyone for following along; I hope this record of what I did was at least entertaining and possibly helpful for other noobs like me who are considering taking on a similar project.

I've got a few more attachments to restore but I will do those in separate threads - this one has lived out it's purpose!

First up is belt guards. My kids will be using this so they are a must. I've got both the counter-shaft guard and the fiber-glass main drive cover. The cast iron guard requires some modification of my horizontal drive and a spacer to mount up properly. The fiberglass cover is pretty janky. I'm not sure exactly how I am going to mount that. I've also got a machine light fixture that needs restoring and installing on a way-bracket of which I have a few.

1 safety guards.jpg


Next up is the lever closer assembly. Mine is complete but needs a restoring. I also need to make the mounting stud (SB part no. #PT997NK1). Very basic part although it does have a milling operation for the screw head.

2 lever closerjpg.jpg


I've also got a complete taper attachment. It also needs a restoration. I have a long tapered part I'd like to make so I will be getting this done in the next month or two (hopefully!)

3 taper attachment.jpg


There are a few accessories that came with. Here is the Four Position Carriage Stop and the Square Turret Tool Block that I actually don't expect to utilize but still would like to service.

4 tool post & 4 stop.jpg


Finally I've got the steady rest, the follower rest, and the milling attachment. Each of these is in great condition and must have been restored by an earlier owner. They need to be painted to match so I will be servicing them, too. I'm assuming they will not need a full breakdown but we will see.

5 followers & milling.jpg


I'll make sure to post short threads when I tackle these projects in case anyone is interested.

Thanks everyone. Evan signing off.
 

mattthemuppet

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Location
San Antonio
very cool and great to see you making chips, nice job! There's nothing quite as satisfying as turning a large piece of metal into a smaller one :)
 

tobnpr

Hot Rolled
Joined
Sep 27, 2015
Only downside I can see to the bed mount is that you'll limit how close to the headstock you can get the cutter. Probably not an issue with a chuck mounted, but might be if you're using collets.

Agree, I had that same thought when I first saw the picture.
There's many times I'm cutting close to the headstock with a micrometer stop mounted on the front v-way in that same location as well. Simple enough to move it elsewhere if the OP finds he needs to. Nice work!
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Micrometer Stop

You guys are surely correct. I haven't experienced the issue yet as I've been using a chuck, but once I get the lever installed I will mostly be using collets for minimized runout (I think?). I picked up a micrometer stop off of eBay and I'm going to do a quick restoration on it. Then its time to move the switch...

micrometer stop.jpg


Agree, I had that same thought when I first saw the picture.
There's many times I'm cutting close to the headstock with a micrometer stop mounted on the front v-way in that same location as well. Simple enough to move it elsewhere if the OP finds he needs to. Nice work!
 

QuickChange

Aluminum
Joined
Jan 28, 2013
Location
NE Ohio, USA
You guys are surely correct. I haven't experienced the issue yet as I've been using a chuck, but once I get the lever installed I will mostly be using collets for minimized runout (I think?). I picked up a micrometer stop off of eBay and I'm going to do a quick restoration on it. Then its time to move the switch...

View attachment 347027


Nice snag on the micrometer carriage stop from the Bay, looks to be in very nice condition. If you don't mind, what are these going for these days? I was fortunate to find one (many years ago) for my SB9 right here on PM.

Regarding your restoration, just a fantastic job! The patience, and attention to detail shown by you (and others here on PM) that is required to do these restorations just boggles my mind! I really can't imagine... My (I'm just the 2nd owner) 1940's SB9 "B" model is pretty much just as it was when it left SB. Same paint, same original GE motor, same everything. Well, over the years, maybe I DID add a quick change tool post;). Maybe the lathe's patina has changed a bit over the past 80yrs, but that is about it. It still performs admirably:)!
 

evanthayer

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Thanks! I am glad it is over :) Sounds like you have a gem in that 9B.

The micrometer stops are not cheap. There were a few on eBay and I ended up getting mine for like $130. Pretty steep. Depending on condition you can find them for $75 - $200 (crazy!!)

Nice snag on the micrometer carriage stop from the Bay, looks to be in very nice condition. If you don't mind, what are these going for these days? I was fortunate to find one (many years ago) for my SB9 right here on PM.

Regarding your restoration, just a fantastic job! The patience, and attention to detail shown by you (and others here on PM) that is required to do these restorations just boggles my mind! I really can't imagine... My (I'm just the 2nd owner) 1940's SB9 "B" model is pretty much just as it was when it left SB. Same paint, same original GE motor, same everything. Well, over the years, maybe I DID add a quick change tool post;). Maybe the lathe's patina has changed a bit over the past 80yrs, but that is about it. It still performs admirably:)!
 








 
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