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2001 Haas MM 320v fault b

propeine

Plastic
Joined
Oct 25, 2015
I've been using my mini regularly, tonight when I went out and ran the spindle warmup program I came back 20 min later to find a flashing red light. 292 error on the control (no others) and a fault b on the power supply which is Regen fault. Check the resistance of the coils and it measures 9.5, restart the machine and start stopping spindle at various speeds. Anything below 1500 it stops. At 1500 and above I get the same error code which can only be cleared by powering down. All axis move normally, spindle will run at any commanded speed. It just doesn't like to stop.

Nothing obvious as far as popped caps or burnt components. We had some weird power stuff recently due to high winds but not while I was running. It ran over the weekend fine.

Any troubleshooting suggestions? I'd prefer not to pay the HFO to drive 200mi round trip as the business is just side hustle but sometimes you have to pay the piper. I'd really prefer not to throw 20% of the machines value into a power supply too, but a dead machine makes no money.
 
I have a TL-1 so, same power supply. I have not been into that power supply but, I'm at least somewhat familiar with what it probably has to do based on the internals of a Vector Drive. The Vector Drive runs the spindle as well as supplies 320V to the rest of the servo drives.

In the lower power machines, the spindle drive gets done with an additional servo drive. What remains for the 320V power supply is to take incoming AC line current, rectify it into DC, pass it through a bank of capacitors and then out to the row of servo drives.

I also expect to find an IGBT in there to deal with over-voltage during a braking event. Spindle has to stop, excess voltage is generated, sent back through the 320V line and it has to do something with it. So the IGBT (Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistor) connects the bus to the regen resistor(s). That causes braking and uses up the excess electricity.

I don't have the regen resistor values in front of me but, you measured it and I assume that's within the happy range?

Are you comfortable opening up the power supply and seeing if you can identify the IGBT? It may very well have screw terminals and not even require soldering to replace it. Everything in the Vector Drive I had open was common industrial electronics, with part numbers right on the components. If it were me, I'd probably replace the IGBT if it's not too much trouble and maybe even the capacitors, just cuz I'm in there.

If you're not comfortable with that, or it doesn't work, replacement of the unit takes like ten minutes. You don't need the HFO to come out for the installation. The one in my TL-1 blew a capacitor and some circuit trace under warranty. They let me install the replacement when it arrived.
 
I have a TL-1 so, same power supply. I have not been into that power supply but, I'm at least somewhat familiar with what it probably has to do based on the internals of a Vector Drive. The Vector Drive runs the spindle as well as supplies 320V to the rest of the servo drives.

In the lower power machines, the spindle drive gets done with an additional servo drive. What remains for the 320V power supply is to take incoming AC line current, rectify it into DC, pass it through a bank of capacitors and then out to the row of servo drives.

I also expect to find an IGBT in there to deal with over-voltage during a braking event. Spindle has to stop, excess voltage is generated, sent back through the 320V line and it has to do something with it. So the IGBT (Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistor) connects the bus to the regen resistor(s). That causes braking and uses up the excess electricity.

I don't have the regen resistor values in front of me but, you measured it and I assume that's within the happy range?

Are you comfortable opening up the power supply and seeing if you can identify the IGBT? It may very well have screw terminals and not even require soldering to replace it. Everything in the Vector Drive I had open was common industrial electronics, with part numbers right on the components. If it were me, I'd probably replace the IGBT if it's not too much trouble and maybe even the capacitors, just cuz I'm in there.

If you're not comfortable with that, or it doesn't work, replacement of the unit takes like ten minutes. You don't need the HFO to come out for the installation. The one in my TL-1 blew a capacitor and some circuit trace under warranty. They let me install the replacement when it arrived.

That all makes sense to me. I'm not great with electronics from a theory standpoint but I have a hot air pencil (from soldering more ram into my MM) and a soldering iron with the skills to use them. I'll try to get it opened up this weekend and see if I can find anything burnt. The IGBT would have to be on the traces running to the resistor box I'm sure so it will be straightforward to follow back. Finding those big caps I imagine will be slightly more difficult.

Good news the HFO doesn't have to install it. Seemed silly they would considering its ~10wires and 4 screws.

Thanks for the reply and I'll keep you posted.
 
That all makes sense to me. I'm not great with electronics from a theory standpoint but I have a hot air pencil (from soldering more ram into my MM) and a soldering iron with the skills to use them. I'll try to get it opened up this weekend and see if I can find anything burnt. The IGBT would have to be on the traces running to the resistor box I'm sure so it will be straightforward to follow back. Finding those big caps I imagine will be slightly more difficult.

Good news the HFO doesn't have to install it. Seemed silly they would considering its ~10wires and 4 screws.

Thanks for the reply and I'll keep you posted.
On the Vector Drive machines the IGBTs are individual components with screw terminals and they mount to the metal chassis. No soldering involved. I'd say they're huge but, someone would come along and point to industrial ones the size of your shoe. The point is: they might be part of the circuit board and may be hanging out on their own with actual removable screw terminals. Even if they're on the board, they'll be the biggest things on it by far, with the largest heat sink and they'll trace right to the output terminals going to the bus.
 
Plot twist, next day it fired up fine and I had work to accomplish so I took advantage of the up time. Wondering if it's temperature dependent as the shop is temp controlled but it occasionally the weather overruns the heater this time of year... 3 degrees and 60mph winds tends to do that to lots of things.
 








 
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