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.22lr How to thread for moderator/silencer

"As long as you have the required paper work they are not illegal in a lot of states.
NY isn't one of them sad to say...."

Right but for the US the paperwork is extensive and it probably opens you up to severe concequences if anything gets muddled somehow, like that guy who is currently getting reamed over his "auto" firing AR 15. I'm never all that interested in owning the kind of firearm that makes the cops think they can kick down your door and shoot your dog or wife just for startes.

The paperwork is not extensive. It's one page. It's called a "form 4". You can get one from www.atf.gov. It does require a law enforcement signoff, fingerprints, a photo, and a $200 'tax'. Or you can transfer it to your corporation and skip all of that. Well, except for the tax. Suppressors fall under the NFA, with machine guns and short barreled rifles. I have a machine gun (MP5), one suppressor, and 2 SBRs, so I've done the paperwork 4x. In years past, they were taking 6 to 9 months to approve, but never years. They are much better now - all mine have been approved in 1-2 months.

The problem with that guy getting "reamed", well, let's just say there's a lot more to the story than was first reported. As in, the guy was likely making illegal machine guns which is why he drew so much attantion.

So for anyone that wants a suppressor, you first need to be sure you're in a state that allows them, then go for it!

As for the thread question - I know someone that is an FFL/SOT that makes and sells his own suppressors. He has a fixture he uses to mount the entire gun, held by the barrel only, in a lathe. But he's had some that make this impossible that he's threaded by hand, very carefully. So they definitely can be threaded by hand. He's also done some where he made a sleeve with external threads that is soldered to the barrel, and some with a 3-lug adapter that is threaded or soldered to the barrel.
 
Perhaps that would be alright with you, but there is no way in hell I would pay someone to hand-thread a barrel with a die on one of my guns. As I said before, it is literally nearly impossible to maintain an aligned thread to the barrel bore. There are too many things to go wrong or out of alignment. ANY gun can be mounted in a lathe. No special fixture is needed. A four jaw chuck will do, and has done for me in the past. As Peter noted above...many rifles have bores quite out of concentricity with their barrel O.D.'s and without a lathe it would be well nigh impossible to align everything. Even when they ARE perfectly inline and concentric from bore to O.D. it would be near impossible to align and thread it by hand without several complicated/involved fixtures that are prone to failure and not nearly as efficient as using a lathe. Just as there are machinists and mechanics that hold the title and the job doesn't mean that they are good at their jobs or know what they are doing. Just my $.02...YMMV.
 
I have threaded some of my own barrels for silencers of my own design, and I always use a lathe and tap/dies. The barrels for two-point mounted silencers are the easiest to thread as I just turn down the barrel in between the muzzle and threads to allow the die to slip on and stay centered. Using a tailpiece chuck holds the die straight. I cut a relief groove and make sure the shoulder in back of the threads is square and centered.
http://www.putfile.com/pic/6069004#

I have threaded a few muzzles for silencers mounted on the muzzle using a tap and die. They work well as long as I make sure the bearing surfacesa re very clean when mounting the silencer for use.

Ranb

Edited to add; In the USA there is no federal law that requires a permit or license to own, buy, sell or make a silencer. A person does not give up their fourth amendment rights when owing a silencer. The only thing required is approval of the ATF form 1 or 4 and paying the $200 tax. Instead of making stuff up, it is better to go to the ATF website and read the law for yourself. Thank you.
 
Uhh, the approval/tax is effectively a licensing/permit, IMO. You must get their approval to own or make one. Argue all you want, but that is my opinion.

Definition of license:

1.formal permission from a governmental or other constituted authority to do something, as to carry on some business or profession.

2.a certificate, tag, plate, etc., giving proof of such permission; official permit: a driver's license. (For instance, a tax stamp)

3.permission to do or not to do something.

4.intentional deviation from rule, convention, or fact, as for the sake of literary or artistic effect: poetic license.

5.exceptional freedom allowed in a special situation.

6.excessive or undue freedom or liberty.
 
The ATF issues licenses to people who import, manufacture or deal in firearms as a business. The tax stamp is only for the one time making of a title 2 firearm, typically by an unlicensed person. The Federal Firearms License and Special Occupational Tax are more costly than the $5 and $200 tax stamps and they entitle the person to do much more than if they only had a tax stamp.

This is why a tax stamp for making or transferring a title 2 weapon should not be called a license, for reasons of clarity. Thanks.

Ranb
 
As already stated, I wouldnt even attemp to use a die to put threads on a rifle barrel. I have cut off several barrels, and rethreaded on a lathe for people that tried to go the easy route. It just dosent work that way. If you cut thread with a die and screw a can on it and shoot it, any misalignment can and will cause baffle strikes. I have seen several suppressors that were trashed out and completely destroyed because of this.

Also, be advised that lots of people will give advice on subjects that they know nothing about...as evidenced in this thread.

I built my own suppressor using a Form 1. It is no different that getting a permit for a manufactured suppressor except that you must engrave name,adress and a serial number that you make up on the suppressor.

It took me a little less that 4 months to get it back from the BATF. It was'nt as big a deal as most people make it out to be, you fill out the forms in duplicate, get two pictures, have the CLEO sign it and get two sets of fingerprints. I got my fingerprints at the Sherrifs Office and then walked the form over to the Sherrif and let him sign it.You send a money order for 200 bucks and wait it out. They are legal in 34 states. If it is legal in your state, and you can pass a background check, you wont have a problem. You get the form approved, it has a "tax stamp" on it, and then you build your suppressor...not before.

I agree, I have a suppressor and the paperwork was not really all that big a deal, definitely easier than the paperwork to get an FFL :-). The law enforcement people do have a right to kick your door in either. The guy with the AR15 was a MORON plain and simple, he made a bazillion posts on a firearms board dedicated to AR-15's and he should have known better than to have an AR-15 with M16 parts in it.

Bill

Bill
 
Right but for the US the paperwork is extensive and it probably opens you up to severe concequences if anything gets muddled somehow, like that guy who is currently getting reamed over his "auto" firing AR 15. I'm never all that interested in owning the kind of firearm that makes the cops think they can kick down your door and shoot your dog or wife just for startes.

Actually, ThomD, the paperwork is not as extensive as you may think. Nor is it a permit/license as some who don't even have one say. They just invent stories, that are quite elaborate and covincing I might say, to muddle the facts. You actually fill out more crap to purchase an auto-mobile than to get an auto. You don't haggle, wait, have the seller run into the back room to see the "manager" which is actually a donut and cup of coffee or a pointless cell phone call (to make you wait more) only to find out the special was over yesterday and now you have to pay more.

No, jackbooted thugs don't come rapelling through your window at 2 am (unless you are wanted for a crime) nor do they come wake you up just to 'see' the item. If they do, and especially if they show up without a warrant, you don't let them in because they are probably not really ATF, FBI, cops or any other law enforcement. They can only walk into a business like that for a surprise 'inspection' during business hours like any other regular customer. I think thats where that 2 am visit myth comes from. They actually will call you and set up an appointment during the daytime or you can go to the field office (bring all necessary papers) if they have a question about a possible mixup. If you behave like you did before you got the item assuming you never got in trouble before, you have nothing to worry about.

The paperwork you speak of is not a permit as I mentioned, but proof that you paid the required $200 tax which is what gets you put in jail for 10 years. Owning an unregistered machine gun is less than a felony and gets you less time. :typing:
This is all you need: 2 form 4's, 2 fingerprint cards, 2 2x2 photos from the pharmacy and a check for $200 for each item. Nowhere on the form 4 will you find the words "license" or "permit".


FORM4.jpg
 
So, for perfect clarification; is the standard US/NATO muzzle thread as encountered on the M4/AR15 platform for example, a 1/2"-28 UNF or UNEF thread?
 
To clarify...standard threads for .22's here in the US are 1/2-28.

That is what US built suppressors are threaded for. Using a standard 1/2-20 die to thread a barrel and you will have a hard time finding a can to fit it.
 
To clarify...standard threads for .22's here in the US are 1/2-28.

That is what US built suppressors are threaded for. Using a standard 1/2-20 die to thread a barrel and you will have a hard time finding a can to fit it.

I don't know that it also concerns suppressors but the threads on muzzle breaks are often anything but standard even though they were intended to come with a standard thread. This is especially true of breaks that are single point threaded on CNC machines. I have seen many 1/2x20, 1/2x28, 9/16x24, 9/16x18, 5/8x24 threads and many others where a correct tap would either barely begin to screw in, or rattle all the way up. I generally check them all with a tap known to be of correct size. If they are to tight I chase the threads and thread the barrel normally. If they are to loose I cut the barrel threads to fit the break and if some one wants to thread on a new accessory later they can modify the accessory or chase the threads on the barrel. It's a foregone conclusion that proper alignment of the two parts is not possible if the thread fit is to loose. I can only imagine this problem would be 10 times worse on a suppressor as its longer. Also, attempting to screw a stainless break on to a stainless barrel with a class 4 or tighter fit is just asking for trouble.
 
Owning a Suppressor ( which is the proper term ) is as easy as buying a loaf of bread if your in the right state and not behind enemy lines like NY, NJ, Mass, Calif, Ill. and a few more. The easiest way is forming an NFA trust by doing so there's no need for the chief of police to sign off, or photographs and finger print card to be filed. I own several suppressors and all I can say is...Silence is Golden;)
 








 
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