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Advice-ready to close doors unless we get help :(

Are you sure you want to go public with that ?


Coming down for the green in the dash .... in about eighteen seconds at least one will be stuffed into the wall :D

They are cool, just maybe a little hard to handle ....

@standard - maybe, but I don't think these guys. Central valley, ag business, mmmmm .....
Yeah, not those guys for sure.
 
I haven't read through all six pages yet. But I haven't seen a lot of comments on old Cincinnati brakes not making life any easier. So I'll comment. The difference between operating a manual press brake or a programmable 2-axis press brake and a modern CNC press brake are night and day.

A modern CNC press brake is going to import solid models and select the tools for you and help you load them and make it fairly easy to make good parts with basic knowledge. A tooling budget that allows buying tools that the software wants to use will make it even easier.

A 2-axis CNC press brake with text input back gauge and bend depth is going to require a lot of knowledge of bending and experience to make good parts in low volume in a job shop environment. Based on the invoice somebody posted from the OP's shop, it looks like they are doing single pieces and very small quantities. That probably means they need a press brake operator who can make first part good part. So they are going to have to be on top of their game. I've had press brakes for 10 years and made probably well over a thousand part numbers and 10's of thousands of parts. When I'm having a good day and I am re-running a part I get first part good part. But there is no assurance with a few thousand hours of press brake experience over a decade that I'm going to take one blank and get it right the first time.

Having a modern $200k+ machine with $100k+ of tooling is probably going to help from a skill level requirement. And probably help prospective employees get a warm fuzzy feeling that they aren't walking into a dead end.
 
it woud seem that othrer workers could train a sharp new guy/gal to do the task. If you had only one bender and no other had any skill then shame on you.

Happening more often these days though.hard to find people who even want to be trained.

Think a lot of the highly motivated/mechanical/ quick learners that would of been workers are all running cnc’s in their home garage shop these days 😂
 
Wait.....wait....WAIT
Just scanned back thru here. You pay $30,000 PER MONTH for rent on 12,500 sq foot?? And you have to pay the property tax that's included in that? Holy crap how can you afford to make enough money in 12.5k sq ft to pay for that and have anything left over? That's mind boggling.
well, that is Canadian money, so about 10 bucks 'merican
[kidding]
29 bucks a foot/yr is high, but depends on the building. First class industrial park is probably that high
That much space, you could have enough machines to pound out more than 10 times that a month, maybe 20....
 
well, that is Canadian money, so about 10 bucks 'merican
[kidding]
29 bucks a foot/yr is high, but depends on the building. First class industrial park is probably that high
That much space, you could have enough machines to pound out more than 10 times that a month, maybe 20....

It's not a high class new business park. Bulk of it is 30 years old and older. It's just Lower mainland BC. High property values, and lots of people want to live there, and been a haven for foreign investors buying property.
 
It's not a high class new business park. Bulk of it is 30 years old and older. It's just Lower mainland BC. High property values, and lots of people want to live there, and been a haven for foreign investors buying property.
Well you can get stuff for 10-15 bucks a foot here so, I dunno who made that deal. The guys in Michigan and Ohio can probably get stuff for a buck a foot
 
Well you can get stuff for 10-15 bucks a foot here so, I dunno who made that deal. The guys in Michigan and Ohio can probably get stuff for a buck a foot

Prices skyrocketed over the last 10-15 years... I can't complain though, Wife and I sold a 3400sq' house on a 7500sq' lot for 1.7 million and got the hell out of the lower mainland.

Vancouver and vancouver area is surrounded by the US border on one side, ocean on the other and mountains on the other two sides. Limited space, and warmest place in Canada to live year round... its California north where you can surf and ski/snowboard, play a round of gold all in the same day. Just need to put up with the rain.

 
Well you can get stuff for 10-15 bucks a foot here so, I dunno who made that deal. The guys in Michigan and Ohio can probably get stuff for a buck a foot
I was looking at commercial properties in Colorado and discovered their commercial property tax is 10%/year. I thought it might be county specific but, their tax records are public. I looked up little general stores, in tiny towns, built inside an old 1,200 sq/ft house on main street. $500K assessed value? $50K / year in property taxes. Yeah, that was a shocker.

So I started looking into Los Angeles County since I've admittedly not rented a commercial property here. It's a lot more circuitous here but likely as bad or worse than Colorado. They have sliding scales for things like the quality of the local area, proximity to major transportation (interstates, major roads, minor roads), local work force, etc.

Given that the OP in this thread is in a very nice, finished business park, a mile and a half from McMaster itself, I would imagine their scores on all of those things are as high as they get. An 11K sq/ft building on a postage stamp sized piece of land has to be worth $2M. 10% of that would be $200K/year or almost $17K/month in just taxes. That's assuming they own it. They've got to be banging out $104/hour in value just to pay the tax man.
 
Based on the prices of 2,500 sf "business condos" out in the Mojave desert ten years ago, that assessed value seems really low compared to sales prices. I realize "assessed values" don't always match though. I'd be curious to know what the taxes are.

This is as close as I could find in 30 seconds. A little larger building but, in the neighborhood. $2.9M.
Edit: it seems that the current lease on this property is just shy of $11K/month. I would be surprised that the lease would be for less than the property taxes so it seems taxes might be lower in California than Colorado.

 
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I was looking at commercial properties in Colorado and discovered their commercial property tax is 10%/year. I thought it might be county specific but, their tax records are public. I looked up little general stores, in tiny towns, built inside an old 1,200 sq/ft house on main street. $500K assessed value? $50K / year in property taxes. Yeah, that was a shocker.

So I started looking into Los Angeles County since I've admittedly not rented a commercial property here. It's a lot more circuitous here but likely as bad or worse than Colorado. They have sliding scales for things like the quality of the local area, proximity to major transportation (interstates, major roads, minor roads), local work force, etc.

Given that the OP in this thread is in a very nice, finished business park, a mile and a half from McMaster itself, I would imagine their scores on all of those things are as high as they get. An 11K sq/ft building on a postage stamp sized piece of land has to be worth $2M. 10% of that would be $200K/year or almost $17K/month in just taxes. That's assuming they own it. They've got to be banging out $104/hour in value just to pay the tax man.
Yeah that is pretty crazy, they passed what we call prop 2 1/2 some years back that keeps property taxes under control. Property in NH for instance, can be less expensive, but then some big bill comes up in a town and the property tax skyrockets, or one town will have much worse than another. NH likes to brag on no income tax, but there is a price to be paid, and if the state does not have the resources to pick up the tab, the town or county must, and that is a smaller group of people. Towns here can bias the tax rates onto business[classification] A 500k building in Boston[a one room shack no doubt] would pay 12k in taxes while a 500k house[A 2 room shack] would pay 6k. But of course it is not like the People's Republic is a low tax utopia, just showing the difference in how those taxes are distributed.
 
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Yeah that is pretty crazy, they passed what we call prop 2 1/2 some years back that keeps property taxes under control.
There's always a way for some whore to screw things up ... In california, prop 13 was actually pretty fair .... until Willie Brown basically exempted large businesses from the "re-assess at sale" feature, which kept it from getting too out of line with reality.

That is now so obvious a mistake that some spendthrifts are trying to scrap the whole thing so they can glom onto a bigger pile of other people's money. All it needs is to back out from Mr Brown's giveaway to become reasonable again, but that's about as likely as scarlett johansson asking to come over and spend the week at my place ....
 
There's always a way for some whore to screw things up ... In california, prop 13 was actually pretty fair .... until Willie Brown basically exempted large businesses from the "re-assess at sale" feature, which kept it from getting too out of line with reality.

That is now so obvious a mistake that some spendthrifts are trying to scrap the whole thing so they can glom onto a bigger pile of other people's money. All it needs is to back out from Mr Brown's giveaway to become reasonable again, but that's about as likely as scarlett johansson asking to come over and spend the week at my place ....
Never paid attention to that, but looks like they did it very differently. Mass real estate taxes/increases etc are based on the aggregate, not the specific.
There is no limit in the amount an individual property can be taxed, but the increase for the total of a city or town in limited. 21/2 can be overridden by the taxpayers voting
Seems simpler
Can result in significant changes in your assessment, but you can also dispute those
 
This lack of available help is chronic. It doesn't matter if you are looking for a plumber, electrician, auto tech, body and paint, machinist etc.
I'm a three year retired GM of a Ford dealer.
The only way we had good, qualified and trained techs is we trained them. it takes years of dedication. They had a goal and a carrot. reach the training goal and they got a raise. We paid very well!
I really feel for you guys. Success is not an accident.
 
I am not going to read all this.
:soapbox:
I see complaints all the time that "I can not find good employees".
Of course you can not find a person who hits the floor running and makes parts in the next day in your shop.
Many will have bad work habits.
Teach, train, invest in the future. That is the job of those upstairs.
The failure is not the employee or applicants.
If all the students fail a class is it the students or the teacher?
Shop owners need to understand teach and lead across varying people types. If not you will be frustrated to your wit's end.
It is not easy.
Bob
 
I am not going to read all this.
:soapbox:
I see complaints all the time that "I can not find good employees".
Of course you can not find a person who hits the floor running and makes parts in the next day in your shop.
Many will have bad work habits.
Teach, train, invest in the future. That is the job of those upstairs.
The failure is not the employee or applicants.
If all the students fail a class is it the students or the teacher?
Shop owners need to understand teach and lead across varying people types. If not you will be frustrated to your wit's end.
It is not easy.
Bob
Your post should be an integral part of any shops business plan.
Where the wrench gets thrown into the best of plans is the small shop, say less than 5 employees, when the key person/owner/brains of the operation drops dead unexpectedly which becomes an instant deciding factor whether the business will continue.
It's likely many on PM have seen how that all plays out...because at that point the "to do list" becomes totally irrelevant.
 








 
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