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Air compressor recommendations for home shop

You can always use a smaller drive pulley and slow that Quincy down to reduce noise if you don't need the full CFM. You'll want to research the minimum speed for that pump.
As for tips. . .

1- Slope all your permanent lines, low point at the end, then put a drop & dump valve there. If you use copper it makes a great condenser.
2- Use vibration isolators to mount the compressor, and don't use any rigid tubes between the compressor and the wall.
3- Take the drain valve out of the bottom of the tank and use a tube to relocate it up where you can reach it standing up, and if possible rout the discharge outside.
Thank you for the reply, All great recommendations. Would sweating copper suffice or does it need to be braised? Also I'm not quite understanding how to relocate a drain from the bottom of the tank up to where I can reach it, wouldn't the drain have to be at the lowest point? I'm sure it's something simple I'm missing
 
Sweated copper is great. On the drain, you just remove the valve and replace it with a 90 degree tube fitting. I like the push-in quick connects use on truck air brake lines. You run nylon tube up to a convenient place and mount the valve there. If you can just walk up to the valve and drain the tank with no hassle you're much more likely to keep it dry. If I get a chance I'll post pics of my set-up. You'll see how easy and convenient it is.
 
Thank you for the reply, All great recommendations. Would sweating copper suffice or does it need to be braised? Also I'm not quite understanding how to relocate a drain from the bottom of the tank up to where I can reach it, wouldn't the drain have to be at the lowest point? I'm sure it's something simple I'm missing

The drain can be up higher in this case, as the air pressure will blast the water right out of the tube. May need to hold it open for a few more seconds just to be sure.
 
The drain can be up higher in this case, as the air pressure will blast the water right out of the tube. May need to hold it open for a few more seconds just to be sure.
That's what it is I wasn't even thinking about the pressure hahaha. Thank you for the clarification
 
Sweated copper is great. On the drain, you just remove the valve and replace it with a 90 degree tube fitting. I like the push-in quick connects use on truck air brake lines. You run nylon tube up to a convenient place and mount the valve there. If you can just walk up to the valve and drain the tank with no hassle you're much more likely to keep it dry. If I get a chance I'll post pics of my set-up. You'll see how easy and convenient it is.
Thank you, I see what you're saying now. Would just regular old PEX pipe work for something flexible to go to the wall?
 
Thank you for the reply, All great recommendations. Would sweating copper suffice or does it need to be braised? Also I'm not quite understanding how to relocate a drain from the bottom of the tank up to where I can reach it, wouldn't the drain have to be at the lowest point? I'm sure it's something simple I'm missing
Yes. Having a drain valve at a low point is going to help you in your knee bends.
Remember, breath in through the mouth and out through the nose. Try to ignore the crackling of the cartilage.

This is the best way to do air compressor plumbing. Cut a copper pipe to exact length and push into a compression fitting.
In 5 years you want to make a modification the work is no sweat. :ill:

Compression fittings are similar to a weld joint. The copper pipe is weaker than the fitting. All I use.

 
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Your neighbors must love you. :D
Mufflers? Those brass sponges.
Yeah, the neighbors are not all that close but I'm sure they appreciated it when I built the equipment room & got it all insulated, etc. The room is small but holds the compressor, RPC idler and heat-pump unit. The nipples on the drain valves are just open. I only put them on because they were handy and they keep the oily sludge out of the valve threads.

Before someone brings it up, yes, the equipment room (4' X 16' X 8' high) is cross ventilated by a 1200cfm blower controlled by an Arduino to assist the heat-pump and control temps. If I'm in the cooling mode in the shop, the blower comes on when the OAT is lower than the equipment room. Opposite if I'm in the heat-mode.
 
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Yeah, the neighbors are not all that close but I'm sure they appreciated it when I built the equipment room & got it all insulated, etc. The room is small but holds the compressor, RPC idler and heat-pump unit. The nipples on the drain valves are just open. I only put them on because they were handy and they keep the oily sludge out of the valve threads.

Before someone brings it up, yes, the equipment room (4' X 16' X 8' high) is cross ventilated by a 1200cfm blower controlled by an Arduino to assist the heat-pump and control temps. If I'm in the cooling mode in the shop, the blower comes on when the OAT is lower than the equipment room. Opposite if I'm in the heat-mode.
The subject here reminded about a muffler I have. Might experiment with it.
I made custom control based on ARM for my compressor and the blow-offs are whatever I want.
The left side is sintered brass. The right side is 3/8 NPT.

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I put mufflers like that on the unloader valve outlets on my Calif. Air Tools 60040CAD compressor. It made a huge difference in the sound burst whenever the compressor stops.
 
I've used those as well, on air actuator discharges. They work well but are not suitable for sludge or contaminate-prone air. There isn't usually a need to quiet a manual compressor drain because it isn't going off in the middle of the night, and when you do use it it's over in a couple of seconds.
 
This is the way I did it. It cost me $15 for a little ball valve (already had one of them) fittings and tube. A little scrap and labor for the mount. There are two valves/tubes because I use two tanks.

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Curious how you fastened the valves to the metal bracket? I like those brass push connect fittings. I used the same type to plumb in the onboard air on my truck but they were plastic. They've held up for 7 years now but would rather use the brass
 
I used square-body brass street-ells and silver-soldered them to the stainless steel L-bracket attached to the wall. You can see the small hole over the one closest to the wall, through which I introduced the solder. If you don't silver-solder you could use regular steel and ordinary soft-solder. I only used stainless because I had it on hand and I didn't want to mess with paint (lazy). Another option would be to simply screw a strap clamp over the valves.
 
I bought a 50 l, not gallon, super quiet vertical for industrial use about 1.5 years ago.
Could not be happier.
It´s 1x00 rpm, maybe 1700 rpm, vs the typical 3400 rpm or so, and the noise level is about 10x less.

I painted auto level steel parts for steel foundations (sauna) in 2-part epoxies, harley parts, industrial parts, and ran largish construction air tools on it.
Maybe 20 cans of industrial expoxy and 60 l == 15 gallons of specialist wood paints, and stuff.

It´s small at 1.5 hp, and 50 l only, but the cheapy chinese are only 25 l tanks.
It lasts 2000 hours after which you change to a new one.
 
Back in '97 our local Lowes was moving to a new building.
They had a major sale. I bought a 60 gallon Devilbiss compressor.
I can't remember the HP, but it's single phase 220v.
I used it as a home shop compressor for painting, mild blasting,etc for a few years.
In 2008 my machine shop was started full time
That compressor is still going.
I've changed the oil in it twice, and one time the popoff valve started leaking.
Other than that it's been great.
I use it for painting, some blasting, needle scaling, dies grinding, spray mister when machining,etc.
Sometimes it's used 7 days a week in all temperatures.
I've been looking at other compressors for when this one takes a crap.
Until then, I'll keep working it.

I'm just a one man shop of that matters.
 
So how would one figure out how many RPMs a compressor pump is running? I would like to change the drive pully to slow the pump down some but have no idea how to tell what RPMs it will be running at. On a gas engine I can just use a handheld tach but there is no spark on a compressor pump. And then there is belt sizing?
 








 
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