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Aluminum Grinding/Sanding

JIMMIEM

Plastic
Joined
Jun 3, 2018
I bought a Door Bottom which is a tube made of Anodized Aluminum. FWIW these either fit into a channel routed into the bottom of the door or a mortise cut into the bottom edge of the door or are just surface mounted. There is a rubber seal inside the tube which is forced downward when the door is closed and seals out noise, cold air, etc.
I had to cut it to length to fit properly between the door stops. I started cutting with a hacksaw and switched to a jig saw. The cut ends are slightly rough and jagged. What is the best tool to use to clean and square it up? I have an angle grinder and random orbital sander. The tube measures 1.901" X .916" and is .083" thick.
Thank You
 
My preferred method is with the 4-1/2" angle grinder, using an 80 grit resin fiber disc with WD40 as a lube/ anti clogging aid to deter build up on the disc. A guide clamped to the door made from steel flatbar or angle will help keep everything straight. I would then use the DA sander to finish it off, without the WD40
 
In my experience, power grinding or sanding aluminum with the very common aluminum oxide abrasives leads to the grit bonding to hot aluminum particles and generally making a mess of the job and the abrasive media. So use silicon carbide or zirconia abrasives for aluminum. Files work well if kept clean.

Larry
 
Skim the end on a chop saw, clamp it and take your time, obviously.
I cut extrusion on a dewalt 12” and a kaltenbach 250, no problems so far.
Low threshold door seals are a common thing, I have them, they work ( not so well when the wind is 70 mph with heavy rain) .
Either way be careful, if uncertain then go with suggested file method, chalk the file first, gummy stuff extruded Ali.
You can’t see the ends when inserted into the frame anyway.
Mark
 
A file is good to start with. Then I often use a random orbit with 120 or so, but its easy to tear the paper.
That's what I did. Filed it some and then used the random orbital sander with the 120 grit. Came out really good.
Thank You
 
Skim the end on a chop saw, clamp it and take your time, obviously.
I cut extrusion on a dewalt 12” and a kaltenbach 250, no problems so far.
Low threshold door seals are a common thing, I have them, they work ( not so well when the wind is 70 mph with heavy rain) .
Either way be careful, if uncertain then go with suggested file method, chalk the file first, gummy stuff extruded Ali.
You can’t see the ends when inserted into the frame anyway.
Mark
I was hesitant to use a table saw or miter saw after seeing some info that their rpm might be too high for this purpose, even with a non-ferrous metal blade. Anyway, I started with the hack saw and then switched to a jig saw. I had cut aluminum in the past with a jig saw so I felt comfortable using.
I just finished up with the file and random orbital sander and I like the results.
Thank You.
I had seen these Automatic Door Bottoms on a TOH program several years ago. I went to some door and window places and most of them didn't know anything about them. I stumbled over them again recently, online. I'm hoping it'll work better than the sand filled door draft snake that I've been using.
 
The ones I use are low clearance thresholds, think it’s primarily for wheelchair and trolleys in hospitals and care homes . That said I have them on my doors, don’t like sticky up bits.
Mark
 








 
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