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Am I the only one who has never heard of an Eifel Plierench?

eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
I went and visited @L Vanice today, had a great time chatting and walking through his wonderful collection of tools and tooling. I have never seen so many watch lathes in one place! He showed me all kinds of neat items including a couple model engine kits he had made and some very nice watch lathe tooling that he also made, along with a very nice little die filer, again built by him. In addition, he introduced me to the Eifel Plierench, which I had never heard of before. It works sort of similar to the modern Knipex parallel jaw pliers, except it has interchangeable jaws! They are easy and quick to change or adjust by just pulling the handles fully open against a spring loaded latch. At that point you can either reposition the jaw for a larger or smaller opening or slide the original jaw out and replace it with one of the other two. There were three in the pliers pouch - a flat jaw with grooves for holding a wire or screw - which is also how the solid jaw is configured; a small round jaw for bending wire; and a jaw with teeth for gripping pipe. And it also has a wire cutter built in too. Very cool set of pliers.

I bought a Hardinge dividing head from Larry, and on the way out, Larry gifted me one of the Eifel pliers that he had demonstrated! A very cool gift, that I had never heard of before he showed it to me. I gave them a good cleaning and a fresh layer of oil when I got home. I thank you kindly for taking the time to give me the tour, the excellent discussion, and for the gift of the very neat pliers, Larry!

I found this article about them too:


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I have a few of those and they are great, good score!
I seem to recal a company making them in the recent past: from 2003:https://archive.org/details/IntroducingPlierench
Masterform is another after eifel, this one shows a full set of jaws:
 
My brother and I used one on our paper route to clip open the wires on the bundles of papers delivered daily to us for our routes. He found it originally. Way overkill for what we needed. But it was free. Finally he lost it... I think it fell out of the worn canvas bag he carried his papers in. You know, the bag fit onto the bike handlebars via the same sling used to carry the bag over your shoulders when walking house-to-house. I have always missed it. It was a cool tool even for a kid that knew nothing about tools.

Denis
 
My brother and I used one on our paper route to clip open the wires on the bundles of papers delivered daily to us for our routes. He found it originally. Way overkill for what we needed. But it was free. Finally he lost it... I think it fell out of the worn canvas bag he carried his papers in. You know, the bag fit onto the bike handlebars via the same sling used to carry the bag over your shoulders when walking house-to-house. I have always missed it. It was a cool tool even for a kid that knew nothing about tools.

Denis

Yup, used to have one of those bags wrapped around my handlebars too; did the same job for a couple years as a 13-14 year old.
 
I delivered papers over here at the same age. Right until I started work at 16. Morning and evening papers. I’ve seen films were paper boys in the US just threw the papers onto the lawn in front of the house. Did that really happen ?

I had two close shaves in that time. I used to walk home along the concrete rim of a nearby mill lodge. I still had my empty bag over my shoulder. One really windy night a massive gust of wind came out of nowhere, filled up the bag, which dragged me off balance and I fell into the lodge. Luckily I managed to scramble out.
On my way back home there was a short cut that involved me climbing over a spiked iron railing style fence. I used to stand on top of the fence then jump off. This particular night, unbeknown to me, one of the spikes went up the bottom of my jeans.
When I jumped off the spike ripped into my jeans and I was spun around to find myself hanging upside down. Held by the turn-ups on my jeans ! I was shouting for help for ages when a little old lady came out of a nearby house to see who was shouting. She had a look, went away, and retuned with a bread knife and sawed through the bottom of my jeans !

Regards Tyrone
 
Hows about throw the paper into a 20 ft high tree ,and get snappy when you asked for a another paper......Always had the paper delivered by car here ......way back in the day(1950s) the paper deliverer had an old 1920s Bentley open boat tail sports .....just an old banger then.....now???...............and one of the paper contract delivers had a fleet of Harley 74 flatheads and sidecars..He used to drop off big bundles of papers at corner stores ,and refill the 'honesty 'boxes ..................Youd surely go broke today putting papers in an 'honesty box'
 
My brother and I used one on our paper route to clip open the wires on the bundles of papers delivered daily to us for our routes. He found it originally. Way overkill for what we needed. But it was free. Finally he lost it... I think it fell out of the worn canvas bag he carried his papers in. You know, the bag fit onto the bike handlebars via the same sling used to carry the bag over your shoulders when walking house-to-house. I have always missed it. It was a cool tool even for a kid that knew nothing about tools.

Denis
We were decidedly up-market - the newsagent provided delivery bikes with a square cage over the front wheel, so you could just drop your box of papers in and go. They were right cranky old grids when I started, so I negotiated to maintain them for a bit extra on my weekly wages.

As for the plierench, it looks like one of those bright ideas that would be hampered in use by cheap production quality, like so many adjustable spanners. Was it as clumsy to use as it looks?

George
 
I delivered papers over here at the same age. Right until I started work at 16. Morning and evening papers. I’ve seen films were paper boys in the US just threw the papers onto the lawn in front of the house. Did that really happen ?

I had two close shaves in that time. I used to walk home along the concrete rim of a nearby mill lodge. I still had my empty bag over my shoulder. One really windy night a massive gust of wind came out of nowhere, filled up the bag, which dragged me off balance and I fell into the lodge. Luckily I managed to scramble out.
On my way back home there was a short cut that involved me climbing over a spiked iron railing style fence. I used to stand on top of the fence then jump off. This particular night, unbeknown to me, one of the spikes went up the bottom of my jeans.
When I jumped off the spike ripped into my jeans and I was spun around to find myself hanging upside down. Held by the turn-ups on my jeans ! I was shouting for help for ages when a little old lady came out of a nearby house to see who was shouting. She had a look, went away, and retuned with a bread knife and sawed through the bottom of my jeans !

Regards Tyrone
I had a similar experience when I was five years old getting the right cuff of my jeans hopelessly caught up in the front sprocket of my bicycle. It happened right in front of a house that was being built and one of the carpenters came over to help me. When he couldn’t get it loose either he cut away the cuff with his knife to free me from my bike. I was happy but I don’t think my mom was too impressed with me when I got home.
 
I had a similar experience when I was five years old getting the right cuff of my jeans hopelessly caught up in the front sprocket of my bicycle. It happened right in front of a house that was being built and one of the carpenters came over to help me. When he couldn’t get it loose either he cut away the cuff with his knife to free me from my bike. I was happy but I don’t think my mom was too impressed with me when I got home.
There's a flashback!
Same thing getting the pants leg run through the front sprocket at a very young age. I was able to really push on the pedals to get it to go through. Then the fear of mom screaming at me for poking holes and getting grease on the pants. Going home almost in tears I dreaded it. Sure enough she screamed and yelled at me for my stupidity. Funny how you remember those moments 70 years later.
 
Also never heard of it. Although it looks high zoot and too spendy for me all those years ago.
 
We were decidedly up-market - the newsagent provided delivery bikes with a square cage over the front wheel, so you could just drop your box of papers in and go. They were right cranky old grids when I started, so I negotiated to maintain them for a bit extra on my weekly wages.

As for the plierench, it looks like one of those bright ideas that would be hampered in use by cheap production quality, like so many adjustable spanners. Was it as clumsy to use as it looks?

George
When I was a young apprentice I had the idea that all I needed to do was to buy two adjustable spanner’s ( wrenches ) and I would be good to go. No need to buy a couple of sets of spanners. That idea didn’t last long. Just too big and unweildy.

Regards Tyrone.
 
I delivered papers over here at the same age. Right until I started work at 16. Morning and evening papers. I’ve seen films were paper boys in the US just threw the papers onto the lawn in front of the house. Did that really happen ?

Regards Tyrone

Not on my route. Pretty rural where I live, I always rode up close enough to land the paper on the porch. If I ever missed, I got off my bike and made sure it was recovered and put back on the porch. Didn't miss much.
 
We were decidedly up-market - the newsagent provided delivery bikes with a square cage over the front wheel, so you could just drop your box of papers in and go. They were right cranky old grids when I started, so I negotiated to maintain them for a bit extra on my weekly wages.

As for the plierench, it looks like one of those bright ideas that would be hampered in use by cheap production quality, like so many adjustable spanners. Was it as clumsy to use as it looks?

George

Use the proper tool for the job, I guess. I can see it being a pretty handy tool. Like the Knipex, they have a major reduction ratio from handles to jaws, so they bite pretty tight, but have limited range. I obviously wouldn't try to use them where needle nose were called for...
 
Although a
I’ve seen films were paper boys in the US just threw the papers onto the lawn in front of the house. Did that really happen ?

Regards Tyrone
There was the occasional errant throw. But, by and large, we got pretty good at tossing those papers from 20 feet or so and landing them on the front porch while pedaling by on the sidewalk. Could not do that on Sunday as papers were too big to roll up and Saturday papers were so light they would not carry through the air well enough. Then there was the crotchety old biddy and her neurotic dog that slept behind the front aluminum screen door. I was darn good at hitting the lower panel of that door and then chuckled as that little yapper went ballistic. Oooops, sorry! 😂

Someone asked if the pliers were clumsy to use. Not all. They were made to a very good quality standard. It has been 60 years or so ago. But, I think the adjustable jaw had a detent that indexed the jaw and held it at whatever opening you "clicked" it to. And they did hold well enough for us kids to use them to deal with most of the bolts and nuts on our bikes.

My memory of tough times related to delivery of the papers in Iowa was the winter delivery of Sunday papers starting at 5. It was not rare for the temps to be -20F, wind 20 and gusting, and snow falling. Then again, once the route was done and breakfast eaten, I took off with my sled for the nearest good sliding hill...

Denis
 
I have a pair somewhere. I had no idea the jaws could be switched out. Mine only came with the installed set. It reminds me of the sears visegrip knock off made of flat steel plates riveted together.
Bill D
 
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Not seen one of those, I remember the wire bundle cutters, geest bananas had a store in Barry docks ( you could even book a Spartan cabin on one of the boats going to the inward islands, a peaceful holiday with great food!)
The bananas were in long orange wooden boxes, I was told to never stick my fingers in the hand holes, spiders scorpions badgers whatever were in there waiting for flesh.
The box was wired shut, a parrot cutter was available to open the box.
Mark
 








 
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