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Am I the only one who has never heard of an Eifel Plierench?

Although a

There was the occasional errant throw. But, by and large, we got pretty good at tossing those papers from 20 feet or so and landing them on the front porch while pedaling by on the sidewalk. Could not do that on Sunday as papers were too big to roll up and Saturday papers were so light they would not carry through the air well enough. Then there was the crotchety old biddy and her neurotic dog that slept behind the front aluminum screen door. I was darn good at hitting the lower panel of that door and then chuckled as that little yapper went ballistic. Oooops, sorry! 😂

Someone asked if the pliers were clumsy to use. Not all. They were made to a very good quality standard. It has been 60 years or so ago. But, I think the adjustable jaw had a detent that indexed the jaw and held it at whatever opening you "clicked" it to. And they did hold well enough for us kids to use them to deal with most of the bolts and nuts on our bikes.

My memory of tough times related to delivery of the papers in Iowa was the winter delivery of Sunday papers starting at 5. It was not rare for the temps to be -20F, wind 20 and gusting, and snow falling. Then again, once the route was done and breakfast eaten, I took off with my sled for the nearest good sliding hill...

Denis
We had to put them all completely through the letter box. One morning I was sleepily putting a copy of “ The Times “ in through the letter box, which was mounted high up the front door, when there was a very loud bang/thud on the back of the door. In a flash the paper vanished out of my hand. It really made me jump ! Obviously there was a very big dog on the other side of the door.

Next day the same thing happened, another rude awakening, but on the third day I was ready to get my own back. I held on tight to the paper and let the dog chew his/her half of “ The Times “ to bits before I let go of the rest !

I didn’t have that problem again.

Regards Tyrone
 
I went and visited @L Vanice today, had a great time chatting and walking through his wonderful collection of tools and tooling. I have never seen so many watch lathes in one place! He showed me all kinds of neat items including a couple model engine kits he had made and some very nice watch lathe tooling that he also made, along with a very nice little die filer, again built by him. In addition, he introduced me to the Eifel Plierench, which I had never heard of before. It works sort of similar to the modern Knipex parallel jaw pliers, except it has interchangeable jaws! They are easy and quick to change or adjust by just pulling the handles fully open against a spring loaded latch. At that point you can either reposition the jaw for a larger or smaller opening or slide the original jaw out and replace it with one of the other two. There were three in the pliers pouch - a flat jaw with grooves for holding a wire or screw - which is also how the solid jaw is configured; a small round jaw for bending wire; and a jaw with teeth for gripping pipe. And it also has a wire cutter built in too. Very cool set of pliers.


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I'm impressed, and I wonder why they faded out. Knipex did exist then, and was making pliers, and didn't fade.

But I was struck by the fact that the price ($6.00) appears to be stamped into the metal - clearly inflation was not a worry then. Which led me to the question of what era was this made, so I looked the two patents (US 1,181,654 and US 1,862,817) up; they roughly straddle 1920, so I looked up the value of $6 in 1920 today - it's $94 in 2024. There was essentially no inflation in the US until the collapse of Bretton Woods in 1971, when President Nixon ended the convertibility of us dollars into gold.
 
The last offering for sale of the Plierench that I'm recalling was in an early-1970s Montgomery Ward catalog. IIRC there were 2 or 3 sets available, which differed in the number of jaws included in the sets.

I have a hazy recollection of a years-later blurb in -- again, IIRC -- Machine Design magazine that a new manufacturer was planning to re-introduce the Plierench, but don't have any memory of the "re-pops" being offered for sale.
 
Found a couple of ads for them in the old catalogs section of my library. First one is from the Mcmasters catalog no. 53, which is from 1946. 3 dollars and 85 cents. The newer one is from the catalog no. 93, which would make it 1986, and, as you can see, the style of the tool has changed a bit, and the price is now $61.40 for the complete kit with all 3 jaws. I am surprised they were selling them that late. I have seen one or two, blacksmith friends of mine have collected them. my guess would be if the 6.00 really was the price, it would be an early 50s version.
 

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Found a couple of ads for them in the old catalogs section of my library. First one is from the Mcmasters catalog no. 53, which is from 1946. 3 dollars and 85 cents. The newer one is from the catalog no. 93, which would make it 1986, and, as you can see, the style of the tool has changed a bit, and the price is now $61.40 for the complete kit with all 3 jaws. I am surprised they were selling them that late. I have seen one or two, blacksmith friends of mine have collected them. my guess would be if the 6.00 really was the price, it would be an early 50s version.

I doubt that Eifel would have had the price stamped in the metal that late. The last of Eifel's two patents from the 1920s expired in 1949, so competition may have moderated his prices.

I have a McMaster-Carr paper catalog 111 copyright 2005 that shows Knipex but not Eifel.
 
The idea of only having three tools to fix the farm machinery (hammer/chisel/giant plier ) went away by the 1980s when cheap socket and wrench sets flooded the market...........I have seen the damage done to motorbikes by three tool mechanics with various kinds of adjustable grips..................a long time favourite was the "Footprint" wrench ,that bit deep into shafts and fittings.
 
Dang, 6 bucks! Mine must have been a bargain at $5. I get comments every time someone sees me using them, I think they are the ultimate roadside repair tool. I need to track down the other two jaws. IMG_2597.jpeg
 
I delivered papers over here at the same age. Right until I started work at 16. Morning and evening papers. I’ve seen films were paper boys in the US just threw the papers onto the lawn in front of the house. Did that really happen ?

I had two close shaves in that time. I used to walk home along the concrete rim of a nearby mill lodge. I still had my empty bag over my shoulder. One really windy night a massive gust of wind came out of nowhere, filled up the bag, which dragged me off balance and I fell into the lodge. Luckily I managed to scramble out.
On my way back home there was a short cut that involved me climbing over a spiked iron railing style fence. I used to stand on top of the fence then jump off. This particular night, unbeknown to me, one of the spikes went up the bottom of my jeans.
When I jumped off the spike ripped into my jeans and I was spun around to find myself hanging upside down. Held by the turn-ups on my jeans ! I was shouting for help for ages when a little old lady came out of a nearby house to see who was shouting. She had a look, went away, and retuned with a bread knife and sawed through the bottom of my jeans !

Regards Tyrone
I see no problem tossing newspapers onto the ground. Almost all newspapers are garbage anyway. They should be called, "propaganda papers". The, "news" in newspapers is selective liberal feces and the papers aren't worthy of cleaning up a healthy deuce.

Don't flame me for telling the truth 😁.
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My father used to immediately check the death and funeral notices and.obituaries when the paper arrived ....seemed silly in the day,now not so silly ....I have no clue who has died ,funerals ,etc .......and some people get very angry that Ive missed a funeral.......obviously not the decd.
 
Thinking about the PlieRench, the thought "hydraulics manufacturer" crept out of the wayback of memory. A bit of on-line research then brought the name Galland Hedding Nopak (GHP) to my attention, and a bit more on-line research confirmed that GHP was, almost certainly, the most recent parent of the PlieRench tool.

Bingo! https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sou...4QFnoECBEQAQ&usg=AOvVaw2udYJDLiPu6Y4gLhTjky6y

I hope that link plays.
 
It reminds me of the sears visegrip knock off made of flat steel plates riveted together.

If you are thinking of the BMC Mfg Corp of Binghampton, NY; they were well made, almost elegant, and in some ways a better design. I think that if they did not pre-date VG, they were certainly contemporary, not a knock-off. The BMC jaw mechanism was such that when new, they always grab in a parallel position. They were plenty tough, but visegrips, while cruder, had forged jaws that often could take more abuse.

Edited: Have a couple pairs of the BMC in the office so googled the patents. Vice grip seems to have been originally patented 1924. BMC's patent is for 1944. So VG does predate BMC by a full score years.

smt
 
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In those days, patents expired seventeen years after the grant date

My points were 1.) BMC are not substandard tools. They were well made of quality materials and hold their alignments and operations well, if not abused. 1.a) if you do tend to abuse tools, Visegrips might better withstand some forms; although when the frame is sprung, they don't work so good either.
2.) perhaps being 20 years later, the idea of the locking pliers concept realized by VG might have had some influence on BMC, but the mechanisms/geometry are quite different. BMC's is more elegant, perhaps a trifle less robust. I have wondered if the BMC version was an attempt to address some of the VG lack of niceties. (BMC is faster and more intuitive to adjust, and the jaws are always parallel)

All that said, one buys the classic shape Vise Grips (as opposed to the specialty versions) almost with the expectation of abusing them. The last ditch resort when nothing else works. Or the first response single tool so you don't have to carry an arsenal to an emergency repair.
 
Helped my BIL "fix" a vw bug exhaust. One bolt flange was broken so we clamped vise grips to hold it tight. lasted for several years with no leaks until he sold the car. Is that abuse? It did get rustier everytime we look
BilL D.
 
I've had this pair for over 50 years along with one of the pairs of Sargent Parallel pliers I have . Your pair I think may be newer than mine from what I read, mine has the 5.00 price stamped on it . My dad had a pair that he took to work & had a groove machined oh the other side of the removable jaw so it could be put in the other way so it could be used as a spreader . I think they sold jaws like that later on . Those Sargent pliers were made in may configurations & some of them had a wire cutter on the side . I saw a pair this weekend at a gun show still in cosmoline & the guy wanted 65 bucks , I bet their still sitting there . They were a bit ahead of the French Man's pliers with a patent date in the 1800's . https://www.sargenttools.com/Customer-Content/WWW/CMS/files/Bernard_Catalog_29.pdf
thing I hated the most bout delivering papers is when folks found out that they could have their paper porched . That doubled the delivery times , ya couldn't ride yer bike or walk across any lawns .
animal
 

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I've had this pair for over 50 years along with one of the pairs of Sargent Parallel pliers I have . Your pair I think may be newer than mine from what I read, mine has the 5.00 price stamped on it . My dad had a pair that he took to work & had a groove machined oh the other side of the removable jaw so it could be put in the other way so it could be used as a spreader . I think they sold jaws like that later on . Those Sargent pliers were made in may configurations & some of them had a wire cutter on the side . I saw a pair this weekend at a gun show still in cosmoline & the guy wanted 65 bucks , I bet their still sitting there . They were a bit ahead of the French Man's pliers with a patent date in the 1800's . https://www.sargenttools.com/Customer-Content/WWW/CMS/files/Bernard_Catalog_29.pdf
thing I hated the most bout delivering papers is when folks found out that they could have their paper porched . That doubled the delivery times , ya couldn't ride yer bike or walk across any lawns .
animal
I had a pair of those pliers with the wire cutters on the side. I may still have them somewhere.

Regards Tyrone
 








 
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