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Another CAD/CAM-CUSTOMER TRAINING - rate question

BOB-OO

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Location
NE PA
I have a customer asking me to help him learn his new CAD/CAM - fusion. Also wants a bit of reverse engineering & time on our CMM. I'm solidworks & have 2 other CAMs(not fusion) but can figure it out and can show him how to do the same. He is purchasing his high tolerance mill/turn parts from us and needs to produce some larger mill aluminum only stuff himself. He just purchased a new 4x HMC and has been generating his g-code by hand!?!
I have tried point him to good information - youtube, paid support from fusion & purchasing some training, etc but he seems intent on getting me to help him.

If you guys don't mind talking actual numbers...what is the going rate for "CAD/CAM" tutoring? My reseller for SW is at $160/hr. I like the guy and he is a customer so a very high rate (my opportunity cost) is the same as saying p-ss off.

I was thinking to ask him how much time he really needs and capping that @ a few hours per week (3-5) and on a schedule. But what to charge and be reasonable about it. I was thinking $200/hr - Please comment? ( all opinions welcome) even that would still cost me money vs doing my work. I would also help him get organized & find proper support from his MTB & Fusion.

Looking for opinions that include numbers.
Thanks!
 
I'm solidworks & have 2 other CAMs(not fusion) but can figure it out and can show him how to do the same. He is purchasing his high tolerance mill/turn parts from us and needs to produce some larger mill aluminum only stuff himself.

I dunno...

Seems to me, everytime I walk up and try to show a student what's up with something I don't really know (take for example, welding aluminum), I get everything all confangled and I'm left frustrated and the student is left with "Wow, this guy is an idiot."

I feel like you might be setting yourself up for a lot of "Ok, try clicking this button...nope, ok, try this one...what if you right-click it first? Hmm...interesting *program crashes* Oops...when did you last save?"

Not an experience I'd make someone pay for.
 
I see people offering tutoring services for less than that, so if he doesn't balk at the idea of 200$/hr and you are still good with it then go for it.

Problem I feel with helping someone like this is there is a bunch of small nick-nack stuff they are always going to be in your ear about. Definitely keep it contract based and say write your questions down and I will help you whenever you have allotted the time.
 
I teach a Mastercam class at my local community college. It averages to ~$110/hr of class time, although that number drops to ~$75 if you count planning time (which you should!), obviously a lower-than-industry rate, but you make it up with volume! :)

I generally charge $150/hr for in-person training on peoples' parts locally (I.e., <1 hr driving distance).

I also would feel really leery of training live on a CAD/CAM system I haven't ran. That's a big opportunity for wasted time for everyone while you look up how to make this specific spline to do whatever in that system. Lots of "tripping over the rug."

Perhaps a better way would be for you to program the parts (paid) and then include a few hours of a "training like" session that you can review what you did with him?
 
have a customer asking me to help him learn his new CAD/CAM - fusion. Also wants a bit of reverse engineering & time on our CMM. I'm solidworks & have 2 other CAMs(not fusion) but can figure it out and can show him how to do the same.
It's going to be hard to unring that bell, but if it were me, I'd just straight up tell him that I bit off way more than I could chew and I couldn't, in good conscience, train someone on subject matter that I'm not familiar with.

My go-to local independent tech will only work on one brand of machine. He is very good at resisting temptation and will not budge when people ask him (all the time) to help fix a different make of machine, even if it's just a simple, generic problem. Keeps him out of trouble and he is never hurting for business. Perpetually backlogged.
 
I had an employee who wanted to take some basic SolidWorks courses. I advised that the built in tutorials are actually really good, but for whatever reason he really wanted to take a course. I told him I would approve the courses after he completed the tutorials, and that I would be there any time he had a question or got stuck with the tutorials. I also let him block off some daily calendar time to work on it.
As expected, once he had the tutorials completed he didn't feel the need to take the courses.

If you were marginally willing, but did not really want to do this I would propose the following:
1. You can teach, but for $200/hr, and on the condition that X tutorials are completed before each session, or you'll need to reschedule.
2. Alternatively, he can take (go Google something up) a course for $/hr less.
 
I'm solidworks & have 2 other CAMs(not fusion) but can figure it out
Fusion CAD is unlike anything else. I now use Fusion CAM after Smartcam and Edgecam and it's OK but as soon as I try to draw something I'm incredibly frustrated. This is after 20+ years of Solid Edge which is a lot like SW, and another ancient CAD before that. You eventually need the CAD side while doing CAM so you'll need to know it to not look incompetent, learning that just to teach him CAM would be onerous.. My choice would be a hard no.
Disclaimer - I have not put huge effort into Fusion CAD.
 
Thank you all for your time. I'm hoping after all my advising him to go another way, he has found someone familiar w fusion.
 
There are tons of good Fusion stuff on You-Tube. Point him to a few of those to get him going. He does not need you to teach him where the gas pedal is. When he gets to the point of needing to make a sharp turn at 100MPH, then you can help him where he needs it.
 








 
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