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anti-seize but not anti-seize for salt road vehicles?

I don't drive my Chev 1500 4wd much; but took it in to the shop for work on the driver side brakes.
They replaced a bearing on the passenger side and said that was the problem.

So, the next time i drove it, to bring back a small mill from an auction before the auto-shop visit, almost did not make it home. *Due to sticking brake on the driver side. :rolleyes:

So i'm back under the truck doing my own work again.
What holy oils would be best to anoint threads as parts are re-assembled, to keep the evil rust demons at bay?
Specifically, brake mounting bolts, brake slider top bolts. and wheel lug nuts?

I will confess - i always spray with LPS#2 & top with #3 on assembly.
Besides LPS, I have sometimes used copper or nickle anti-seize on lug nuts and never had an issue.

But what is the "safe" product to use in areas like these?
Or are all the warnings about not using anti-seize in such areas just so much superstition?

smt

*It's not the sliders, which shop *probably* checked. It's the MC & booster drum full of brake fluid locking it up.
But i still have to put the calipers and such back together after freeing, etc, etc
 

henrya

Titanium
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Location
TN
I use anti seize on lug nuts and have for a long time without problems. It does help. I apply a small amount, then rub it in with an old toothbrush. Too much spins off onto the wheels and makes a mess.

You might want to try Ultra Tef Gel on the brake attachment bolts. My experience is that it works as advertised. Its expensive, but a little goes a long way. I use it on my boat and outboard.

For anything near the brake pads, I pick a lube made for the purpose. I also think its a good idea to install new pins or sliding brake parts. Not expensive and well worth it unless the old ones are 100% perfect.
 
Thanks for the reassurances on anti - seize: Never had a problem anywhere i used it. But there's always that nagging thought....
Blue loctite makes sense, just never tried it. Thanks for the nudge.

Thanks for the link, Dan - this is more or less what i "didn't know it was made but knew i needed it"

To recap: It is not the sliders, they are fine. Probably what fooled the shop. I did unbolt them to check, though. The (more expensive) problem is the MC leaking into the vac booster and not letting the puck bleed down. So it is trashed, too.

smt
 
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Cole2534

Diamond
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
I got this tip from a boat forum- use thread sealant. No water, no galvanic cycle, no corrosion.

I use Loctite 567 because it's what I have but there are probably better answers.
 

Corn

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Yes, it is pinewood tar. It works also somewhat as a thread locker as it`s stiff. I`ve opened nuts where surrounding threads have completely rusted away. Under the nut which was installed using tar, thread was like new.
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
On the brake calipers that use guide rods, I modified my colorado by drilling thru the end of the 'socket", and added grease zerks, never any seizing problems in over 150 k.
 

Tom A

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Location
NW Florida
One thing to check, since you're from the rust belt - The rubber hose to that brake.
On some vehicles, the steel clamps or brackets bonded to the hose can rust and swell enough to partially block the hose - Stepping on the brake will overcome the blockage, enough to engage the caliper, but when you let off, the pinched hose will not let the caliper retract = Sticking brake caliper.
I found this out the hard way, after trying a whole bunch of other stuff.
Just sayin'
 
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eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
I have been using anti-seize on brake bolts for 30 years with nary a problem. Cut your tightening torque a bit so you don't over strain the bolts and everything will be fine. My first real experience with it was in my first full time job as an apprentice machinist. That shop made and serviced a LOT of equipment from the steel mills. EVERY single fastener we installed in EVERY piece of equipment got anti-seize on it. From ¼" on up to 3" diameter. None ever came loose. And those were absolutely crucial to remain tight or people could be killed, millions of dollars in damage could be done. Most of them were safety wired as insurance in case they did come loose. None ever did. We serviced most of the equipment that we torqued and wired, so it would come back to us straight from the mill when it needed rework. Never saw anti-seize cause an issue, not once. And believe you me, I asked - because as a young kid I had heard stories like the ones about not using anti-seize from my dad (nowadays I know better than to listen to most of his stories from childhood) and other adults. The millwrights stressed and burned that into my head - "use anti-seize on EVERYTHING!"

But I would be careful not to have it oozing to excess everywhere in the vicinity of brake rotors, etc. Obviously you don't want that near the braking surfaces so it doesn't drip or fling onto them... For brake parts I generally just put very little on the brush and work it into the threads well. If any gets outside of the threads I clean it up with brake parts cleaner or acetone, whatever is closer.
 
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triumph406

Titanium
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Location
ca
You could avoid all this BS and live in Southern California!!!!!!!!! There you go

In the UK, I had a Honda 400/4, it was neccasary to pull the calipers off every 6 months to grease all the fasteners and pivot pin due to road salt and corrosion.

The first m'cycle I worked on in the US was 10 years old, and apparently I was doing it's first brake job (it had maybe 10'000 miles) The bolts and pivot pin had zero corrosion. Got to love SoCal.
 

Cole2534

Diamond
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
On the brake calipers that use guide rods, I modified my colorado by drilling thru the end of the 'socket", and added grease zerks, never any seizing problems in over 150 k.
Now that is an idea! I have a vehicle that suffers from creaky guide rods and it's the greatest gripe of all owners.
 

macgyver

Stainless
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Location
Pittsburg, KS
Stephen, I advise replacing the rubber hose from the frame to calipers as well. I have had more than one come apart inside and make a very effective check valve and it looked fine on the exterior. They are cheap enough and you will be bleeding the system anyway. You might also look at the steel lines while there, some generations of GM pickups the brake lines rust very quickly. I have a '99 Sub that the rear lines failed and I was able to get a full stainless kit front to back for app $130.
Not sure if you need to go that far into it, but I'd suggest checking it all out as best you can while there.

As for lube, a guy that used to be on here alot is now working on cars fulltime in IL and he fights rust on everything, he uses the Permetex purple ceramic extreme brake lube. It's at the top of the page in the link dkmc provided.
 

RC Mech

Stainless
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
Location
Ontario, Canada
Some above alluded to it but it has not been stated outright: anti-seize is for threads and not for guide pins or pad backing plate surfaces.

Appropriate synthetic lubes like Syl-glide for guides. Anti-seize will not work for that application.
 








 
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