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Antique Lathe Identification Help

Bizzyrne

Plastic
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Hello,

I recently purchases an antique lathe that I am having trouble identifying. I was wondering if anyone on the forum here has some experience with that? I've included a photo as a start. It has a 36" throat, its belt driven and I'd be happy to get other details

Thanks!

JB
 

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spaeth

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jan 28, 2008
Location
emporium pa
JB,
Cope's American Lathe Builders book shows a Muller that has the two knobs on the face of the apron and a handle on the right side of the carriage. Springfield and Bradford are close having those features as well. Their history puts the same guy, Ed Muller being an influence during late 1800's early 1900's.
spaeth
 

L Vanice

Diamond
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Fort Wayne, IN
More photos would be helpful. The lever operated tailstock is unusual for a lathe of this size/style.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

True, but South Bend and Clausing sold kits to convert their screw-feed tailstocks to lever feed. It is reasonable to think other and earlier makers did the same. Hardinge, Mikron, Schaublin and some watch lathe makers sold separate lever-feed tailstocks as optional equipment. Lever feed tailstocks are handy for drilling and can also be used to hold a single turret tool, like a die head or knurling tool.

Larry
 

Andy FitzGibbon

Diamond
Joined
Sep 5, 2005
Location
Elkins WV
True, but South Bend and Clausing sold kits to convert their screw-feed tailstocks to lever feed. It is reasonable to think other and earlier makers did the same. Hardinge, Mikron, Schaublin and some watch lathe makers sold separate lever-feed tailstocks as optional equipment. Lever feed tailstocks are handy for drilling and can also be used to hold a single turret tool, like a die head or knurling tool.

Larry
All very true, but it's still an unusual feature on a lathe of this size and style, and may provide a clue as to who manufactured it.

I also think I may see some bevel gears inside the headstock cone pulley... perhaps that's what drives the feeds. Another unusual feature that may help with identification. Bevel gear feed drives are also fairly rare.

More photos would help a lot.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

Bizzyrne

Plastic
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
More Photos

Thanks for the replies. I'll be heading over and getting some more photos for you guys hopefully early this week. I just purchased it and still need to figure out how to move it. If moving it isn't possible or I just can't figure out where to put it, I'll probably have to sell it. I purchased this from an older gentleman who has decided to move on from collecting old tools.
 

spaeth

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jan 28, 2008
Location
emporium pa
Andy,
Good eye on seeing the bevel gears. I increased the pic and they are sure enough there, and it looks like the drive is a big cone with no grooves or crowned steps for a belt. So perhaps an early variable speed tapered drive set up? The lever on the left maybe engages the bevel gears. Looks to be in nice condition for it's age.
spaeth
 

trevj

Titanium
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Interior British Columbia
Andy,
Good eye on seeing the bevel gears. I increased the pic and they are sure enough there, and it looks like the drive is a big cone with no grooves or crowned steps for a belt. So perhaps an early variable speed tapered drive set up? The lever on the left maybe engages the bevel gears. Looks to be in nice condition for it's age.
spaeth

Dunno. I take the bevel gears to be engaged and disengaged by the lever above and to the right of the spindle. Bevel gear Back gearing mayhapss? It looks to be a squeeze to unlock type of lever there.

I think the angle is making that step pulley blend in to being one smooth looking surface. When I zoom in, I can see a shadow line that looks like a crown or maybe the edge of the large pulley step. Dunno. Can't be a pile of guys used any bevel gears right behind the spindle nose like that.
 

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
Possible the bevel gears inside the large diameter cone pulley are effectively back gears. Looks to be some sort of mechanism to the right of the bevel gears that maybe clamps onto the spindle?
 

jmm03

Hot Rolled
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Location
ventura,ca.usa
It appears to be a basic enough machine that disassembly into component parts could be an option. Putting it up on 4 x 4's long wise and bolting it down or building a pallet and Egyptian rolling it would be preferable, extra help would be advised. You could rent an engine hoist of a suitable capacity and carefully sling it to lift it up, making sure you do not load the lead/feed screw and bend it. Looks like an interesting machine. Jim
 

Robert Lang

Stainless
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Location
Minneapolis, MN
I don't know who's make the lathe is. Some components, such as the legs, look like Reed.
The beveled gears are for the power feeds.
From the style of headstock and the beveled gears, it looks like a swivel head like the Gage lathes,
but it does not look like any Gage lathe I have seen.

Rob
 

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Jim Christie

Titanium
Joined
Mar 14, 2007
Location
L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
The new pictures help a lot .
It looks like that lathe is a special one for turning tapers by swiveling the headstock with the graduations on the base hence the need for the bevel gear drive setup to connect with the feed screws as shown in your picture here,
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/...ntique-lathe-identification-help-img_4386.jpg
I seem to recall there was another thread on this forum where there was another one or links to an old book showing this type of setup but I can't find anything in a forum search so far.
I have a different edition of this book and the page where it may be described is not clear in the on line version .
International Library of Technology; a series of textbooks for persons engaged in the engineering professions and trades, or for those who desire information concerning them : International Textbook Company : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
I'm not sure where my copy is at the moment but I'll take a look in a couple of days.
If not someone else may remember or turn up something.
Maybe doing a patent search will turn up more too.
Jim
 

esbutler

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Sloansville, NY
This is very interesting. A swivel head indeed. I agree with Rob in that there is otherwise little resemblance to a George Gage lathe.

Please do get any information you can with regard to this particular lathe's history.

Thanks, Eric
 








 
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