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Anyone using heated (electric) sox/gloves/footpads?

stephen thomas

Active member
A few days ago i rode up the ski lift with a guy who said he was 83. He was really pleased with his electric gloves, but said the batteries were expensive, and proprietary. I have had Raynauds all my life, so the idea is appealing. When i started to research options, there are a bewildering array!

Anyone tried anything they really like and think is durable? (decent battery life season to season, as well as good prodcut durability. Preferably not the $200 & up products. Almost convinced my ideal product would dispense with the tiny cheapo batteries that fit in the cuff of the sock or glove, and use my regular Porter Cable 20v rechargeable batteries on a waist clip or front coat pocket, even though it would require some wires. :)

Anyway, i have 0 exposure to the products and only started looking online a couple days ago.

The old guy noted that due to age he can ski free at all the big NY state run resorts including Whiteface, Belleayre, a few others. He planned to stay alive long enough to make sure to he got his money's worth.

smt
 

jermfab

New member
I believe both Makita and Milwaukee have a couple of options for heated vests and jackets. No idea how well either works.

I know that you can get bases/docks for both of those manufacturers batteries… not necessarily from the manufacturer, but there’s outlets offering 3D printed bases/docks on Amazon and eBay.

I would hazard there’s someone making a similar setup for Porter Cable batteries.

I’m sure changing the battery will void the warrantee on any manufacturers heated clothing.

Equally certain Porter Cable isn’t likely to offer heated clothing any time soon as they seem to offer the fewest number of Li-Ion devices, especially compared to Makita, Milwaukee and Ryobi.





Be safe




Jeremy
 

CalG

Active member
I run the Sida insole boot heaters. Game changer for my feet.
My fingers do OK as long as I keep moving. First ride up and ski down today had some chill to it. But a few more turns and everything was good.

My feet are so locked in the boots, they never seem to warm on their own. That's where the battery comes in ;-)

But ...Spendy!

The SIDA PRO battery packs are SMALL and provide about 7 hours of warmth on low setting.
I've had them for four years, Still charge up fine. When they go. I'll be looking at another set up, because I think these are obsolete.
 

stephen thomas

Active member
Maybe missed the point-
PC batteriees are 20V.
Most clothing items, at least mittens/sox are between 3.5v & 7.4v for the "hi voltage" type.
So the necessary component is a DC variable voltage reducer.

Will this one do the trick?
20V battery to 3.5v or 7.4v item?

smt
 

5 axis Fidia guy

Active member
I have a pair of Cabelas battery gloves for hunting, I use them on and off throughout the day and the battery lasts me from dark to dark. I just this year got a heated undergarment and do the same thing with it. They are lifesavers for me as a skinny guy that gets cold easy. Battery power has come a long ways, the Milwaukee stuff is top notch, and based on the price, they know it.
 

lucky7

Active member
Ice climbing guide friends use Thermic brand insoles. They want a little extra heat when working for slow clients, but light weight. Durability sounds like less of a priority than lightweight, which is probably opposite of what you want. Having said that, my friends like em.

Personally, I use chemical mitt warmers when back country skiing below -25 and high altitude chemical feet warmers (need less oxygen to burn). I don’t ice climb when very cold anymore, and now that I’m in my mid 50’s, staying inside instead of skiing on very cold days seems ok ;-)

L7

On edit: forgot to mention Intuition boot inserts are the cat’s ass :)
 

richard newman

Active member
I'm watching this thread closely, have been thinking this is what I need for walking the dog. My hands are always cold, especially the thumbs.

Stephen, if you do use a DC variable voltage reducer, don't strap it to your waist, or the SWAT team will be greeting you!
 

Milland

Active member
Set yourself on fire...everything will be warm then...

That sounds like the "set a fish on fire, and it'll be warm for the rest of its life" parable.

Like Richard above, I'll be following this. Last week I started checking out Amazon's offerings in the lower range (>$100), but wasn't impressed with anything I saw.

I agree with those that say you can hack any proprietary battery pack (for generic 18650's for instance), but if you go with a DeWalt or similar tool battery make sure it's placed for minimal pain if you fall on it (if using it for an active purpose like skiing). So don't strap it to your hip (or helmet, for that matter).
 

dalmatiangirl61

Active member
I'm watching this thread too. Anyone else here have feet that sweat when cold? I don't have this problem in summer, only winter, at the end of the day my socks are soaking wet, and feet are ice cold:confused:. Wondering if heated socks would help.
 

lucky7

Active member
^^^ use spray on antiperspirant. Works well to keep feet dry and warm. Might smell better too, but no guarantees.

L7
 

DDoug

Active member
Maybe missed the point-
PC batteriees are 20V.
Most clothing items, at least mittens/sox are between 3.5v & 7.4v for the "hi voltage" type.
So the necessary component is a DC variable voltage reducer.

Will this one do the trick?
20V battery to 3.5v or 7.4v item?

smt

If you have (4) items, you could switch them as all series for lowest, and then start paralleling them for more current draw.
20v/4 = 5v
 

CalG

Active member
IMG_20220118_174210809.jpg

Six hours of foot warmth battery size.

Good things come in small packages.

A second on L7's endorsement of the intuition liners.

The chem packs work fine for cold hands. Not expensive if you buy them 20 at a time. But they don't carry over the off season . Pesky Oxygen permeation.

Wet feet can be warmed with insole heaters, but you are better advised to change socks. Be sure to dry your foot wear, not just remove them and let them sit in a cold entry way. Also, Foot powder helps stay dry. Some folks even spry their bare feet with antiperspirant.

My feet sweat for the first half hour of a day outside in winter. So I change socks around 9:30 am. Good for the rest of the day.
 
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Milland

Active member
I'm watching this thread too. Anyone else here have feet that sweat when cold? I don't have this problem in summer, only winter, at the end of the day my socks are soaking wet, and feet are ice cold:confused:. Wondering if heated socks would help.

Some mention of electric insoles above, may allow wearing more breathable footwear.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Active member
Some mention of electric insoles above, may allow wearing more breathable footwear.

Some loose fitting insulated boots seem to work best for keeping feet dry, ok for working around shop, but with jeans tucked into them I won't wear them in public, I'm no fashion maven, but don't want to look like a dork either:eek:.

Lucky
Antiperspirant for feet ehh, never considered it, I'll give it a try.

Cal
Shoes go under the woodstove, so nice and toasty warm when I put them on:)
 








 
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