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Anyone using heated (electric) sox/gloves/footpads?

tnmgcarbide

Diamond
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Location
N. GA- 33.992N , -83.72W usa
use common sense. what's the common platform... usb cell phone batteries. a monster - brick can cost
1/10 of a similar dewalt or milwaukee tool battery. i have a heated jacket i bought on amazon for
less than 30 dollars. i wear a levi or carhart denim jacket over it when i work in my machine shop.
batteries last about 2-3 hours. but i have a bunch,,they cost about 10-12 dollars apiece. usb batteries
are cheap and abundant. tool based batteries are wildly expensive, not readily available .~100 dollars
apiece for same A/HR as a 10 dollar brick . the cell charging brick doesn't need to be tough.
 

CalG

Diamond
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Location
Vt USA
Some loose fitting insulated boots seem to work best for keeping feet dry, ok for working around shop,

snip

Cal
Shoes go under the woodstove, so nice and toasty warm when I put them on:)

Ahh, Pre Warmed boots, especially insulated ones don't work for me. My Feet start sweating before I have the laces tied. I Much prefer, NO, MUST HAVE, room temp or colder boots to put on.
I keep all my outdoor work boots on a shelf about 10 feet from the wood stove. (After they are thoroughly dry.)

I don't even like insulated work boots. I much prefer something like Redwings, or a linemans single leather boot with room for decent insoles and layered socks. It's the sweat and wet thing.IMG_20220118_211332983.jpg

Cold weather selection. (Not including the hard shell Alpine boots)

The rubber bottoms are handi, but worthless for walking in. They pull socks down and wad up in the arch.

The rubber mud boots are my go to for winter tractor work. A very heavy pair of tall wool socks over a lighter pair. AND a "leather plus sheep's wool" insole to keep out the cold underfoot.

The electrified heated insoles can be slid into any of these (and others) on cold days. Very nice when working in the woods. ;-)

ETA

I have a Gerbings 12V heated vest that I use for cool weather motorbike rides. I also put a suitable receptical in the dash panel on one of the tractors. NICE! ;-)
 

CalG

Diamond
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Location
Vt USA
use common sense. what's the common platform... usb cell phone batteries. a monster - brick can cost
1/10 of a similar dewalt or milwaukee tool battery. i have a heated jacket i bought on amazon for
less than 30 dollars. i wear a levi or carhart denim jacket over it when i work in my machine shop.
batteries last about 2-3 hours. but i have a bunch,,they cost about 10-12 dollars apiece. usb batteries
are cheap and abundant. tool based batteries are wildly expensive, not readily available .~100 dollars
apiece for same A/HR as a 10 dollar brick . the cell charging brick doesn't need to be tough.


IF we could just get all the makers of battery powered stuff to use the same connectors! ;-)
 

72bwhite

Titanium
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Location
California, Ventura county
Used heated socks, gloves and jacket liner ridding Harley in the winter.
Make sure you get Socks that don’t have wires in the sole.
Also need to have a layer between you and the heated stuff so you don’t get burned
Gerbing or something like that was the brand they, also market to hunters so have batterie packs
 

Bill D

Diamond
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Location
Modesto, CA USA
That sounds like the "set a fish on fire, and it'll be warm for the rest of its life" parable.

Like Richard above, I'll be following this. Last week I started checking out Amazon's offerings in the lower range (>$100), but wasn't impressed with anything I saw.

I agree with those that say you can hack any proprietary battery pack (for generic 18650's for instance), but if you go with a DeWalt or similar tool battery make sure it's placed for minimal pain if you fall on it (if using it for an active purpose like skiing). So don't strap it to your hip (or helmet, for that matter).

Give a man a plane ticket and he will fly for a a day. Shove a man out of a plane and he will fly for the rest of his life.
Bill D
 

jmead

Hot Rolled
Joined
Mar 29, 2006
Location
Island County, Wa
I'm watching this thread too. Anyone else here have feet that sweat when cold? I don't have this problem in summer, only winter, at the end of the day my socks are soaking wet, and feet are ice cold:confused:. Wondering if heated socks would help.

I swear by these for that issue:
Amazon.com: XTRATUF Bama Sokket Insulating Removable Men's Boot Liners (28500), 12 : Clothing, Shoes & Jewelry

They are made to wear with Xtratufs which is how I use them, and you probably need to go up 1/2 size with other boots.
At the end of the day they will be soaking wet but your cotton socks underneath will be dry. Magic.
 

CalG

Diamond
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Location
Vt USA

CalG

Diamond
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Location
Vt USA
Has anyone picked up on how this topic might relate to the topic on Li-Ion battery and recharging ;-)
 

thermite

Diamond
That sounds like the "set a fish on fire, and it'll be warm for the rest of its life" parable.


Save yer money. Save a fish.
Carry a "MAGA" hat in a darkroom bag.

Get to the cold zone? Hand it to anyone near you who will be in eyeshot.

You'll be on fire for the rest of the day. One less shelf short of edible fish.
End of problem.

:D

Seriously, folks?

We'uns tend to go LAZY and allow ourselves to slowly drift towards circulation issues that not ALL of the world's aged HAVE.

Many of them are reversible. Better life-style choices can reduce that problem, and not by just a LITTLE bit.

I have less of a problem with cold hands or feet (Zero, actually..) in year 77 - even as a heavy smoker (of Tobacco!) - than I had at 17 or 27.

Change in diet. Closer attention to WHICH Vitamins we may be shorting ourselves of. Not foolish fads. The real McCoy.

Looser and better insulated thermal leggings, gloves, socks, boots.. and selected so I even enjoy greater freedom of movement than I once had.

Stylish? Hardly!

Comfy? Bet your warm ass!

Ever a woman born didn't keep a man around primarily as her private "furnace".. to warm her cold feet on his gluts? May be more to a marriage, but that's way ahead of whatever is in SECOND place!

:)

Tlinkit, Inuit, Nepalese, "Sherpa", Tibetans, other Far North year-round "Esquimo" native peoples, US or EurAsia have never needed batteries to not just survive, but thrive with no never-mind in cold we can barely imagine.

Adopt some of their basic practices, even their HEADGEAR as well as footwear and other clothing?
Worry, then, about becoming OVER heated.

And EAT according to the needs of the day. Of course.
There's your "battery". Well-proven technology, even.

Brain KNOWS it has more than adequate reserves?
It authorizes expenditure of the energy for comfort and full functionality.

Brain thinks it is fragile and under threat?
Slows-down activity, husbands resources for a long-term siege, withdraws circulation from extremities so as to preserve the vital "core".

HEAD most of all. Naturally. That's where "GHQ" resides. Warm head? Warmer hands and feet. Go figure head even has to SHED heat, and where better to do it?

Didja know that every single capillary in our massively complex blood circulation system has a command & control NERVE attached to it that can shut it TIGHT.. or open it WIDE?

Talk about clever Engineering?

Work at it, you can learn to run one hand warmer than the other.. sitting at your kitchen table. Or fumbling with lug-nuts, changing a tire, dead of winter.

Don't know how? Pilgrim? Your "system" has never forgotten. All it needs from top-level "GHQ" is "make it happen" mission-type orders.

Not as if humans never had to deal with this challenge until BATTERIES were invented, is it?

Solution was designed-in. Long time ago, already. And not by no amateur.

Use it or lose it.
 

tnmgcarbide

Diamond
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Location
N. GA- 33.992N , -83.72W usa
i'll keep that in mind when i'm standing in line at 7AM in front of the academy store to buy 9mm .i'm
in my heated jacket, have my thinsulate Chippewa boots ,gloves , and a toboggan hat . the wind is
whipping so fast that you can't see , because your eyeballs will freeze. if i'd only done 50 pushups
and taken a few vitamins prior .......it would all go away. guy next to me is wrapped in a wool army
blanket...i suppose he needs to eat more vitamins and practice some yoga and ju-jitsu as well.

as a machinist- you use the tools available. steer the ship the best way you know. find your pleasures
where you can.

don't be a hero ... it will not impress anyone and you'll just get sick.
 

thermite

Diamond
i'll keep that in mind when i'm standing in line at 7AM in front of the academy store to buy 9mm .i'm
in my heated jacket, have my thinsulate Chippewa boots ,gloves , and a toboggan hat . the wind is
whipping so fast that you can't see , because your eyeballs will freeze. if i'd only done 50 pushups
and taken a few vitamins prior .......it would all go away. guy next to me is wrapped in a wool army
blanket...i suppose he needs to eat more vitamins and practice some yoga and ju-jitsu as well.

as a machinist- you use the tools available. steer the ship the best way you know. find your pleasures
where you can.

don't be a hero ... it will not impress anyone and you'll just get sick.

"The ^^^ best^^^ tools available" were gifted you at birth, some 4.5 Billion years of evolutionary fine-tuning - to conditions on THIS planet - after the equivalent of some form of celestial "Johnny Appleseed" passed by.

Or "however" it actually worked. I wasn't in the room.
Probably out shagging something or other "interesting" that day?

Point is, we are here, now, and equipped rather well, after all.

"Brains" are on the list.
Yazz. Better sense counts, too.

Where was YOUR "army blanket" as a "cowl" to protect the eyes, or yer googles, if what you had-on wasn't a match to the need?

If I was expecting to "stand in line" outdoors? I might have arrived resemblng a mobile wigwam or a Walrus. [1]

Use those tools. Or forget you even have them?

You are not LIMITED to bare-nekkid BTW!!! Grow HAIR if nothing else!!!
Ask a horse how they doo that. Neat trick, speaking of "reserves".

:)


Y'see.. your equivalent of many warehouses of Lista tool cabinets have a staggering inventory of what was initially thought to be "junk" DNA with no obvious role.

Those are an ancient library. Of the tools of commerce. And the engines of war.
"Reserves", if you will.. with all manner of specialities. Chemical process factories, mostly.

Need they the odd "cosmic ray" to switch to active-duty?

Nah. A few minutes after triggered by a need, they are busily folding Proteins to long-proven old blueprints.. in order to add or enhance an ancient capability.

Fly into a high altitude city? What's the common advice?

Three days to acclimate, and you have a massive shift in red blood cell count to manage on thinner air. Because humans have had to do that.. somewhere.. somewhen.

No interest in "impressing" folks. How can one if they have bailed-out ahead of yah?

"Get sick" is another thing a serious human is incredibly well equipped to deal with. Or outright prevent.

Not "hero". Not "superman'. What we need to do MOST is cease foolishly SELF CRIPPLING our average selves.

Go figure, no matter how badly we abuse ourselves ...the surest indicator of probable life expectancy remains the age at time of death of your OWN parents, grandparents, and great grand-parents.

Unless, of course you step in front of a speeding garbidge truck!

Shall we revisit this, each in our respective 95th year, then?

There is still a great deal to LEARN, after all!

Garbidge truck avoidance, if nowt else!

:D

[1] Walking 2 miles back and forth to HS 20 degree to minus ten, and WINDY Western PA winter weather in a light windbreaker shell jacket called a 'McGregor Nylon Anti-Freeze" over the lining it had.

Warm enough, but there was a cheat.

Dad's six feet long, 18 inch wide US Army 1942 ALCAN Highway Surveyor's UK Olive Drab dyed pure Kashmir Wool scarf across head & ears, other end around my balls.

Was the Corps of Engineers that Arctic-wise in '42?

No. The opposite!!

But ALaska-CANada project, yah?

And Hudson's Bay Trading Company saw an opportunity to sell the Hell out of what THEY already Knew!

:D
 

Scruffy887

Titanium
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Location
Se Ma USA
Not gloves or boots, but heated grips on my snow blower are the cats ass. Gloves got wet from thick wet snow and drizzle. But they were really comfortable and warm.
 

thermite

Diamond
Not gloves or boots, but heated grips on my snow blower are the cats ass. Gloves got wet from thick wet snow and drizzle. But they were really comfortable and warm.

Exercise the brain, too.

Skin two cats. Tan them. Turn them fur-inward. Sew mitts.
No need um 'lectric. No such thing as cold furry pussy.

Or WOOL inner gloves, tile-setter's fabric-in waterproof synthetic-rubber OUTERS.

Not hard. Many of us have "some form of the above" lying around the kitchen or shop already paid-for.

Why suffer when one can adapt!
In advance, even!

You thought you were going berry-picking of a summer afternoon?

With a snow blower?

Pilgrim? Them are for harvesting cucumbers!
Where'd you THINK pickle relish came from?
 

Joe Miranda

Titanium
Joined
Oct 19, 2004
Location
Elyria Ohio
My sons and I use these: Amazon.com: XBUTY Heated Socks for Men/Women - Upgraded Rechargeable Electric Socks with 4800mAh Large Capacity Battery- Up to 16 Hours of Heat, Upgraded Heating Element up to 160℉, 3 Heat Settings, Black : Sports & Outdoors we get about 4-5 hours on the medium setting which is pretty good when you're sitting in a tree stand in 20 degree days. I am guessing that on the ski slopes you could get away with the low setting but even if you turned them up to the high setting you get three hours out of a charge. How long are you on the slopes?
 

crossthread

Titanium
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Location
Richmond,VA,USA
My feet don't get particularly cold (maybe I can't feel them anymore), but my hands sure do. I have found that if you put on a pair of those disposable nitrile or whatever gloves and then your regular gloves then your hands will stay much, much warmer. I think there are two things going on. One, the "rubber" gloves keep your hands from coming in contact with wet outer gloves and two, they hold in the heat. Have you ever noticed how your hands are sweaty when you take off rubber gloves? The other thing I have learned is to wear mittens instead of gloves if your activities will allow it. They are much warmer then gloves with separate fingers. Any hunter who has pulled his fingers out of regular gloves and made a fist in the palm can tell you this.
 








 
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