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Barnes Velocipede Metal Lathe - input please

Mounting a modern wood lathe banjo and tool rest on the Barnes 4 1/2 so it can be quickly removed and restored to original:
 
I was able to mount my Nova G3 chuck on this Barnes lathe by using the four jaw metal chuck it came with to hold a “Chuck Reversing Adapter” that’s used while centering a bowl on a vacuum chuck. It has the proper 1” x 8tpi thread.

Fortunately this adapter was a lot beefier than it looked in the photos online, and I was able to mount it in one of the original metal lathe chucks


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This is not a self centering metal lathe chuck so it took a lot of adjusting of the four individual jaws but I was able to get it well centered. Then it was just a matter of screwing on the Nove G3 chuck.
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This combination looks long and bulky but that actually helped because it moved the wood blank farther to the right on the bed of the Barnes lathe, so I’m not working with my left hand all the time.

I just spent some time playing with it late this evening once I got everything centered and a piece of wood on the chuck.

I looked at my watch and realized I have been pedaling this lathe for at least 40 minutes, but I didn’t even realize that because I was trying to turn a captive ring in several pieces of wood.

I got close several times working with a bedan type chisel but couldn’t quite make it work yet.
 
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Brian, I'm interested in your parts. You could possibly turn wood on this one.
I am turning wood on it successfully. I just need a little more speed and endurance to achieve a decent final result.

Which parts are you interested in?
 
Brian,
Have you discovered the back gear on your lathe yet? It may increase your speed.
I thought the back gear was to slow the spindle speed while increasing the torque via gear reduction? When the back gear is engaged the spindle speed definitely decreases, at least with the current gearing.

Is there a way to increase spindle speed by changing the change gears?

Oh, I just reread my last post. When I say I need to increase speed, I mean my own pedaling pace and endurance, not the relative speed of the lathe spindle.

When a young friend was on it he was able to maintain the pedal cadence at more than enough speed to effectively turn wood.

Me? After a heart attack, bypass, a pacemaker and five strokes, I’m still not doing bad all things considered. But only because I took up e-biking to help my physical recovery from the strokes.
 
I wasn't sure if you knew about the back gear or if it was engaged on your lathe.

Whenever I sell a lathe I demonstrate to the new owner how to engage and disengage the back gear. The vast majority of them did not know the feature existed.
 
I wasn't sure if you knew about the back gear or if it was engaged on your lathe.

Whenever I sell a lathe I demonstrate to the new owner how to engage and disengage the back gear. The vast majority of them did not know the feature existed.
Fortunately the back gear and its lever are pretty obvious/prominent on this old Barnes (unless I’m missing something?):
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I am turning wood on it successfully. I just need a little more speed and endurance to achieve a decent final result.

Which parts are you interested in?
Brian, I have an almost-fully functional lathe. Do you have a price in mind for the whole package of your lathe and its parts?
I mainly need a steady-rest, that I know of. I have had several parts fabricated and have bought several reproduction castings of parts.
 
I thought the back gear was to slow the spindle speed while increasing the torque via gear reduction? When the back gear is engaged the spindle speed definitely decreases, at least with the current gearing.

Is there a way to increase spindle speed by changing the change gears?

Oh, I just reread my last post. When I say I need to increase speed, I mean my own pedaling pace and endurance, not the relative speed of the lathe spindle.

When a young friend was on it he was able to maintain the pedal cadence at more than enough speed to effectively turn wood.

Me? After a heart attack, bypass, a pacemaker and five strokes, I’m still not doing bad all things considered. But only because I took up e-biking to help my physical recovery from the strokes.
If I were you, I'd belt up your Ebike to the lathe so you don't have to pedal at all! LOL
 
Brian, I have an almost-fully functional lathe. Do you have a price in mind for the whole package of your lathe and its parts?
I mainly need a steady-rest, that I know of. I have had several parts fabricated and have bought several reproduction castings of parts.
Ok, please see my private message.. Thanks
 
Most people can figure out the back gear engagement, but few know about disengaging the bull gear pin to make it all work correctly.
Is that the pin under my thumb here? My problem was keeping it engaged with the pulleys to keep the spindle turning at a higher speed, because it wanted to fall towards the center with gravity and into the position to disengage from the pulley and engage the back gear. I had to temporarily and very carefully place a small sheet metal screw behind it so it would stay engaged with the pulleys.
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Brian, I have an almost-fully functional lathe. Do you have a price in mind for the whole package of your lathe and its parts?
I mainly need a steady-rest, that I know of. I have had several parts fabricated and have bought several reproduction castings of parts.
You can also contact me at eight 1 four 5O2 nine 44 two.
 
Is that the pin under my thumb here? My problem was keeping it engaged with the pulleys to keep the spindle turning at a higher speed, because it wanted to fall towards the center with gravity and into the position to disengage from the pulley and engage the back gear. I had to temporarily and very carefully place a small sheet metal screw behind it so it would stay engaged with the pulleys.
That's the one.

There is probably a way to tighten that.
 
That's the one.

There is probably a way to tighten that.
The prior user had placed a sheet metal washer under the pin, apparently for the pin to tighten against, so it staying engaged with the pulleys. It seems to be an old problem.

I was a bit intimidated to try to back this pin out the whole way and replace that washer, in case this pin captures some kind of mechanism between the bull gear and the pulleys, in case I wouldn’t be able to recapture that internal mechanism when I screwed the pin back in.

Do you think it’s safe to back that pin out completely and replace that washer so it can tighten up properly?
 








 
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