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Best iscar inserts for stainless

Don't look at the cost of the insert. Look at the money it makes.
If a $12 insert makes your 3x more money than a $7 insert, well the $12 insert is cheaper....
If you're roughing 316 efficiently, the chips pay for the inserts anyway.
 
We work 8 hours per day but do not run the job for all 8 hours. We are a two man shop so the two of us are doing everything...quoting, purchasing, running other jobs, etc. Plus 15-20 minutes to warm the machine up in the morning, 30 minute lunch with machine idling, etc.

For that specific job I was talking about, .1" doc, 350 sfm, .008-.010 feedrate. I say two days but it's really about a day and a half. About 12 hours roughing on that op. Sometimes it takes 16 hours just because we are doing so many other things at the same time and forget to reload the machine or only run the machine just part of the day since we are doing other stuff.

We considered doing it in the mill with a corncob endmill but do not have a chip conveyor. The lathe has a chip conveyor so that is where we do it


Ok, I haven't seen the part, and I don't know what machine you're doing it on...

But have you considered using something like a 3mm wide grooving insert and peck grooving to near net shape as a roughing cycle?

Because the way you're doing it sounds like it could be faster, from my Thursday morning armchair quarterback position.
 
It very well might be faster. I'll bring in across my dad and see of he would want to do it. But right now our process works and it's kind of like if it ain't broke don't fix it. But it might be worth a shot
 
It very well might be faster. I'll bring in across my dad and see of he would want to do it. But right now our process works and it's kind of like if it ain't broke don't fix it. But it might be worth a shot

I work for a group called Continuous Improvement. My entire job is to take things that aren't broke and make them better. Same parts, same quality, faster cycle = more $$ per part.
 
We work 8 hours per day but do not run the job for all 8 hours. We are a two man shop so the two of us are doing everything...quoting, purchasing, running other jobs, etc. Plus 15-20 minutes to warm the machine up in the morning, 30 minute lunch with machine idling, etc.

For that specific job I was talking about, .1" doc, 350 sfm, .008-.010 feedrate. I say two days but it's really about a day and a half. About 12 hours roughing on that op. Sometimes it takes 16 hours just because we are doing so many other things at the same time and forget to reload the machine or only run the machine just part of the day since we are doing other stuff.

We considered doing it in the mill with a corncob endmill but do not have a chip conveyor. The lathe has a chip conveyor so that is where we do it

We use hangsterfers 5080. The salesman came by today and talked about the Iscar 6015 and 6025. He said they are newer grades but are more money.
The job I was talking about we run load meter at 60%. Try not to go higher than that.

First, let me sumarize the original post & point of this thread, then a couple observations...

Summary Question - Is there a better turning insert for roughing 300-series stainless steels?


A couple observations...

1- Um, Why would you "Warm up" a machine for 30 minutes, then let it rough for 30 minutes before the first finish cut? Turn the machine on, throw a new insert in, and let it "warm up" as it roughs out all of your material. Add an offset to your finish tool, walk away, and read the newspaper as the machine "warms up" simultaneously as it also "makes money" by making productive use of shop time...

2- Or, since you're just a 2-person shop, go do something else productive with YOUR time, while it warms up --- I mean, is cutting --- that first 30 minutes a day.

3- You're babying the machine for no apparent benefit... Will the part fly out of the chuck at 63% spindle load? Answer - NO. Take a deeper cut, a little more feed, and rough the parts out faster.

4- Faster roughing = less time on the machine = less time waiting on that job to finish up = less time spent on that job = more money left over after invoicing.





Summary answer to this thread so far - I'm just going to keep doing the exact same thing that we've been doing, since you know, blah blah blah...





[Take a deep breath Jashley... Take a breath...]


I do sincerely mean, welcome to the PM forum, and I DO hope you stick around. But when you ask for & get good advice such as the responses in this thread, try to consider that advice before brushing it off...
 
Just to play Devil's Advocate a little:

I'm a one man shop. Although I find threads about maximum matl removal and high feed this-n-that interesting, the simple fact of the matter is..
If I speed up my 6 min cycle time to 2.5 minutes, that means the machine is going to sit 3.5 minutes longer before I can get back to it. I'm more interested in stable processes that I don't have to babysit.

Sometimes I have 4 CNC's I'm trying to keep running. I don't really care how fast I'm making parts, just that I'm doing my best to keep all machines running throughout the day.

YMMV
 
Hi Jashley,

1. We always warm up our machines before operation. In fact, there is a sticker on our machines telling you to do so before operation at the start of each day. Helps let the oil circulate. It is also in the manual. Just like warming up your car before use. Makes the bearings and ways last longer and helps lubricate them before use or heavy use.

2. While the machine warms up, we are always doing something. Both of us wear all the hats so we are always doing something. We work a lot of weekends too. We always keep busy.

3. We try to run the machine roughing at around 50 to 60 percent, sometimes higher depending. It isn't a strict rule of thumb. We typically don't choose our doc based on load meter reading. We use the doc that is recommended to use by the tool rep. The load meter is just there for us to look at. It does not guide our processes.

4. We make plenty of money on the job. Could always make more though hahahaha :)

As far as doing the same thing Blablabla, we may try groove roughing next time. Read the above post.

My main concern was the different iscar inserts grade for stainless. That was my original question.

Hopefully you wake up on the right side of the bed tomorrow.
 
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Just like warming up your car before use. Makes the bearings and ways last longer and helps lubricate them before use or heavy use.

You know that you haven't had to warm up a car in decades? My 300+K Corolla hasn't been warmed up once in the 150k miles we've had it. Same with a Honda Accord that made it too 299k miles.

If the first program on a CNC wasn't running faster than 3000rpm I didn't bother warming up the spindle. If there was a part that was at 6000+rpm I would have the first program running at 50% spindle, and 50% feedrates. After 10 minutesd of that it would be 100% on everything.

I have a 1991 Fadal 4020 that gets a program in the morning that moves the table to it's limits, and 1/2 the Z travel, and warms the spindle. The problem with the Fadal is the Turcite eventually goes bad, so I'm doing my best to keep the Turcite/ways as oiled as I can, so as to delay the inevitable.
 
Triumph,

I have shown my dad the posts and he completely agrees with what I have said. Most people are very helpful and respectful, such as in this thread, except Jashley. I post legit questions to promote discussion and conversation and get half cocky answers that are very condescending. Refer to my threads about reaming, keyways, and this thread. It is unacceptable, so I call it out when I see it. Read how rude Jashley's post was above. The topic about keyways: I post our process and what has worked for us over the years, and people are quick to comment on how ridiculous it is and how there is "my way and everybody else's way, etc." Very rude and condescending. I am here for polite discussion and just get cocky condescending answers. If you do not have anything kind to say, please refrain from posting. Respect the fact that people do things differently than you.

There was one thread recently (couple weeks old) where somebody was brand new to CNC and who just ran manual his whole life. On this forum, he asked for some pointers and basics of getting started and just got trolled all the way to the bank. It was ridiculous and unacceptable. We are better than that.

Back to the topic, we always warm up the spindle because it says so in the manual, and it says so on the machines. The one tech we use also says to do so, so that's what we do. You could probably get away without doing it, but we try to follow what the manual and the tech says. The mill that we have is used, and it actually came with a warm up program when we bought it.

Triumph, what inserts brands for stainless do you use and what grades do you use? Do you like them better than the iscar?
 
Cgrim3,
Try Walter CNMG 432 -NMS Grade WSM10. Keep your F.008/.010, but I would tweak the S350 upwards a little bit every day until you are comfortable and noticing that you got an extra part or two done in a day. Good luck.
 
thanks for the tip. What do u run? Like 400 sfm? Thats a definite improvement. We have some Walter tooling and it is very good stuff
 
Without knowing your part, work holding, etc, I think you can easily go to S400. I run at S450-S475 with a D.2 (.1 per side)F.010 to F.012 all the time. That is running barstock; no interruptions.
 
Hi vandytech,

What rockwell C is your d2? I agree we probably could run it faster. Do you use right or left hand holders?

Besides using the iscar rep, I have a book about machining stainless steels and the numbers for turning they give for 300 series are .1" doc, 310 sfm. I think that is pretty conservative.

Thank you for the response
 
The D.2 I was referring to was the depth of cut as programmed on our Okuma lathe. D.2 means .100 per side.

We always run left-handed OD turning tools (M4) because the cutting forces are into the turret/cross slide. Also, it easier to see what’s going on.
 








 
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