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best paint stripper

brent.bousquet

New member
Im trying to remove some very stubborn paint and so far no chemical strippers have worked. Mostly i just used what I had which is more for removing finishes from wood so maybe they arent strong enough. I was wondering if anyone had some suggestions for the strongest chemical remover.

Im doing everything I can to maintain the surface underneath to the point where even wiping it with a cloth will be too damaging so I really need something that will lift the paint and be able to just wash or be very gently wiped off.

theres a mirrored surface underneath the paint and thats what I want to maintain.
 

Turbowerks

Member
Talk to a powder coat company or supply they have some stuff that will strip powder paint. Not cheap i guess but it gets it done


When I find it I don’t need it
When I need it I can’t find it!
 

JST

Moderator
What is the surface made of? What sort of paint?

I have found that strong alkali removes most, but not epoxy paints. Peelaway #1 is a one that does a good job.

Peelaway #7 is also good where #1 cannot be used.. Both wash off, #1 washes off a little better.

But the paint may be an epoxy or other material that requires a different type stripper, from what you say.
 

ballen

Active member
Theres a mirrored surface underneath the paint and thats what I want to maintain.

Could you please tell us more about this surface? Is it a glass surface with reflective material on the top surface? Is that layer silver or aluminium or nickel or chrome or ??? What's under that reflecting surface? Is it glass or metal or something else?
 

Tony Quiring

New member
Sams club has grille cleaner in 3 pack of quarts with trigger spray for about 10 bucks.

Oven cleaner.

Spray on, let it work, hose off, repeat.

Attacks anything organic and aluminum.

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

dalmatiangirl61

Active member
This mix works well on latex and oil based paint, have not tried it on epoxy.

5 gallons of warm water, dissolve in 1 pound of dry lye drain cleaner, add in corn starch (+/- 1 pound) until you get gooey consistency of your liking. This mix works best hot (fresh), will stick to vertical surfaces, and lift paint in under an hour. You MUST wear eye and skin protection, and keep children and pets away.
 

Mark Rand

Active member
Dichloromethane is still the best paint stripper, usually in an alkaline mix.

Unfortunately, it's increasingly hard to get hold of because people don't take proper precautions when using it.
 

kustomizer

Active member
I have used brake fluid on small things I can put in a zip lock bag, pour it in and a couple days later everything on the part wipes off. It may work faster, I have never been in enough hurry to look. I do know its not instant, overnight at least.
 

brent.bousquet

New member
thanks for all the posts. so i didnt add more info because i dont actually know. I dont know what type of paint it is but it is on glass and i dont know if the mirrored surface underneath is silver or aluminum. I will just try a bunch of stuff and see what works best. Thankfully i have a few spares i can test on before i actually strip the real mirror.
 

brent.bousquet

New member
it is on glass but i dont know what the paint is or what the mirror is made of. My bet is aluminum because i think most somewhat modern mirrors are aluminized.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Active member
Precision mirrors are made by vaporizing aluminum which deposits on the glass, not sure about commercially produced mirrors, but I suspect paint stripper is not going to work. Let us know what you figure out, might come in handy some day.
 

Tony Quiring

New member
Forgot about brake fluid, safe but slow.

Try that first as it is safest chemical for unknown material.

Just let it work in A bag and rinse.

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

ballen

Active member
it is on glass but i dont know what the paint is or what the mirror is made of. My bet is aluminum because i think most somewhat modern mirrors are aluminized.

There are two types of mirrors, front surface and back surface. Most household mirrors are back surface, where the reflective layer is BEHIND the glass, which protects it from fingerprints and paint stripper. Most optical device mirrors are front surface, because there is only one reflection from the front surface and it's easier to control the flatness, optical losses, and quality.

Is your mirror front surface or back surface?
 








 
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