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Best tool for quickly cleaning up cuts on tubing

skiffe

Plastic
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Atlanta
My business is centered around cutting lots of 1/16" wall tubing in diameters from 1/2" to 1" and lengths from 1.5 inches to 6 feet - 6061 and 6063 aluminum, 4043 steel, and carbon fiber. I'm happy with my saw but the cuts still need a quick grind to smooth out the sharp edges. I've been using a $200 12" table top disc sander for years and it works fine, but am upgrading some tools and wondering if there is a better/quicker tool for the job that I should consider. Less than $1000 preferred but open to anything. Thanks!
 

kustomizer

Diamond
Joined
Aug 17, 2007
Location
North Fork Idaho
My business is centered around cutting lots of 1/16" wall tubing in diameters from 1/2" to 1" and lengths from 1.5 inches to 6 feet - 6061 and 6063 aluminum, 4043 steel, and carbon fiber. I'm happy with my saw but the cuts still need a quick grind to smooth out the sharp edges. I've been using a $200 12" table top disc sander for years and it works fine, but am upgrading some tools and wondering if there is a better/quicker tool for the job that I should consider. Less than $1000 preferred but open to anything. Thanks!

I am thinking a "square/debur end finishing machine is about
Tube / Pipe End Finishing Machines – PHI
But likely don't make the price you are hoping for, it might be worth contacting a few makers of such machines to get some samples and cycle times.
 

gustafson

Diamond
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Location
People's Republic
First cut with zero burr

I used to use a countersink and then a stone with an internal taper, but I was only doing small qty and that was a long time ago, and then only for the stuff that could not go in the vibratory tumbler
 
G

guest

Guest
Severance has a line of rod end cutters for deburring and chamfering tubing.

http://www.severancetool.com/pdf/Severance_Tube_Tools.pdf

I have one of those sensi-threaders setup on a workbench for this. I just crank it down so it doesn't reverse- put the chamfer tool in the chuck and hold the tubes by hand. Takes under an hour to do 100 SS tubes this way.
 

skiffe

Plastic
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Atlanta
Thanks for the input. I looked at the ideas and didn't see anything that looked like it did the light work I need better/quicker than the disc sander. Hand tools are definitely not what I'm looking for (we already use an ID deburrer). We can easily do a couple hundred tubes in an hour. I guess at this point I'm wondering if a disc sander, which works, is better than a belt sander (never used one).
 

Mike1974

Diamond
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Location
Tampa area
Thanks for the input. I looked at the ideas and didn't see anything that looked like it did the light work I need better/quicker than the disc sander. Hand tools are definitely not what I'm looking for (we already use an ID deburrer). We can easily do a couple hundred tubes in an hour. I guess at this point I'm wondering if a disc sander, which works, is better than a belt sander (never used one).

Depending on the quality/size of the belt sander, it will somewhat "warp" and wrap around (if that makes sense) the tubing, possibly making it better, or worse...?

If you can do 200 or so in an hour, sounds like you got it downpat with what you are doing. But I think you are missing the point about the id/od tools. Mount one of those bits in a drill chuck (could use a zip tie to keep it powered on?), or variable rpm motor, insert tube, zip, flip, zip... maybe even rig a stop so they are consistent in size.....?
 

skiffe

Plastic
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Location
Atlanta
Depending on the quality/size of the belt sander, it will somewhat "warp" and wrap around (if that makes sense) the tubing, possibly making it better, or worse...?

If you can do 200 or so in an hour, sounds like you got it downpat with what you are doing. But I think you are missing the point about the id/od tools. Mount one of those bits in a drill chuck (could use a zip tie to keep it powered on?), or variable rpm motor, insert tube, zip, flip, zip... maybe even rig a stop so they are consistent in size.....?

This does sound like a good idea for the ID that we are still using a hand debur tool. I'll check them out again.
 








 
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