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Big Swing Monarch

lucky7

Stainless
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Location
Canada
Reserve of $4000 seemed high to me. Plus odd tailstock- but headstock end didn’t looked raised in sand… Odd.
 

sfriedberg

Diamond
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Location
Oregon, USA
From the tooling photo in the auction album, I would guess that this lathe was used heavily/primarily for boring. Looks like the three (!) superheavy boring bar holders mount in place of the compound, on top of the cross-slide riser. I wonder if there's a large faceplate that got separated from the machine (or at least not included in the tooling photos).
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
In case a BIG one you might like the beast sized NN
 

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jlegge

Stainless
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Location
Grayslake, IL

This is link to an odd big lathe. Went no bid at govt auction.

Bob
The frame in the back looks to be for a tracer tempete. This is a raised in the sand Model 60/61. I wish they include a picture of the name plate on the headstock. This would be considered a medium size lathe at Monarch.
 

Arc-On

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 6, 2011
Location
Holland, MI
Can someone please tell me where the phrase "raised in the sand" came from? I've only ever seen LeBlond refer to theirs as a plain "raised lathe". Which makes sense, seeing as how the headstock and everything simply was raised up with risers.

Where did the sand part come from? Is it something manufacturer's actually used? Does it have to do with sand cast riser blocks?
 

bob

Titanium
Joined
Aug 12, 2002
Location
Regina, Canada
Did anyone notice that there are no "knobs" on any of the hand wheels? Thinking it must have been built for some kind of power feed. Maybe the tracer is possible.
Hate to think what the Canadian taxpayer shelled out for it.
 

bsg

Titanium
Joined
Jan 17, 2003
Location
Imlay City, Michigan
Did anyone notice that there are no "knobs" on any of the hand wheels? Thinking it must have been built for some kind of power feed. Maybe the tracer is possible.
Hate to think what the Canadian taxpayer shelled out for it.
On some of the Monarchs with rapids the carriage knob was omitted, unsure on the cross slide, possibly related to the tracer attachment?

You can see a picture of the tracer attachment on page 22 here in this brochure.........


Kevin
 

sfriedberg

Diamond
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Location
Oregon, USA
Can someone please tell me where the phrase "raised in the sand" came from? I've only ever seen LeBlond refer to theirs as a plain "raised lathe". Which makes sense, seeing as how the headstock and everything simply was raised up with risers.

Where did the sand part come from? Is it something manufacturer's actually used? Does it have to do with sand cast riser blocks?
The "sand" part comes from the foundry sand casting process used to make the machine castings. "Raised in the sand" means that patterns for a normal swing model were used in the foundry sand molding process to create a mold for a larger swing lathe, in contrast to using patterns explicitly intended for the larger swing. In essence the cavity to receive molten iron was "stretched", adding space between two pattern components that would normally produce a shorter cavity. So the result is one piece, not a sandwich of three pieces with the middle one being a riser. Molders had several ways they could do that; it did not always require creation of a spacer pattern component.
 








 
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