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Birch lathe I found in Dad's shed

Scubayorp

Plastic
Joined
Mar 7, 2024
Location
Western Australia
Hi folks,

I'm a newbie and know nothing about lathes except I used them in metalwork and woodwork at school in the early 70s!

I'm cleaning out Dad's estate and would love to know more about this Birch lathe. We'll keep it coz our grandfather used it but curious to know about its design e.g. I can't see any carriage screw etc. Maybe it's lost a few parts over the years?! There are 'bearing races' at the bottom of the back legs so I guess it was designed for some kind of drive system that had a connecting rod?
 

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Consult the oracle here :- http://www.lathes.co.uk/birch/index.html some details about Birch lathes.

As Tony says Birch generally made prosaic and ordinary machines for general trade use which were typical of the time. The interesting things like the front way and ornamental turning type being much rarer and not a staple of the business.

Yours is a typical woodworkers lathe that could have been made from WW1 through to anytime between the wars or even after WW2 if the company were still in business. I suspect they went out of business in the depression years tho'. Drive would originally have been via flat belt so the pulley has been changed. Could also have been used for turning with hand tools but rather big for that I think.

Clive
 
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Consult the oracle here :- http://www.lathes.co.uk/birch/index.html some details about Birch lathes.

As Tony says Birch generally made prosaic and ordinary machines for general trade use which were typical of the time. The interesting things like the front way and ornamental turning type being much rarer and not a staple of the business.

Yours is a typical woodworkers lathe that could have been made anytime between the wars. Quite possibly before WW1 too, and after WW2 if the company were still in business. Drive would originally have been via flat belt so the pulley has been changed. Could also have been used for turning with hand tools but rather big for that I think.

Clive
Thanks Clive, I had a good look around Tony's website and have emailed him. You've taught me heaps! Thanks again.
 
The T rest shown could also be used for metal turning with long handled steel tools .............if you want to see this done ,check a utube on bell founders ............bells were always turned freehand .
 








 
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