What's new
What's new

Boring on a Devlieg

gregfortin

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
I really enjoy using this little boring mill. I seem to use it as much as my lathe in the shop.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_5919.jpeg
    IMG_5919.jpeg
    91.4 KB · Views: 86
  • IMG_5918.jpeg
    IMG_5918.jpeg
    98.2 KB · Views: 84
  • IMG_5917.jpeg
    IMG_5917.jpeg
    88.5 KB · Views: 83
  • IMG_5916.jpeg
    IMG_5916.jpeg
    99.3 KB · Views: 84
  • IMG_5915.jpeg
    IMG_5915.jpeg
    89.8 KB · Views: 86
  • IMG_5914.jpeg
    IMG_5914.jpeg
    90.4 KB · Views: 86
Do you have any cartridge style boring bars and heads?

Those slide style boring heads like in your picture are super flimsy and subject to a ton of deflection/sloppiness/inaccuracy.
 
I’m not sure what that type of boring head you are referring to. Would that be a micro bore style with adjustable inserts?
 
I’m not sure what that type of boring head you are referring to. Would that be a micro bore style with adjustable inserts?
I'm reasonably sure that's what he means. The DeVliegs I ran were used in the production shop, and standard boring heads were used only for roughing. Semifinish and finish boring was always done with the "DeVlieg bars" as they were called. The result was once you had things set, you ran all shift without having to crack the bars for size. Back then they all used cemented inserts, not the replaceable type.
 
Pushing the vee blocks up against slot stops gives you a bit more security and enables you to set the vee blocks up easier.
In fact, devlieg holds squareness and size on the t-slots extra-tight, just for this reason.

Umm, it looks like we're machining with the platen kind of hovering in an intermediate location ? Not supposed to do that. In or out, but not just floating. Platen out is supposed to be for taking measurements (altho it's normal for people to cheat in order to fit odd-shaped parts). Normally should run it in against the stop for cutting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcd
You can put the platen where ever you need. That is why there is an adjustable stop to set where the platen will rapid in and stop.

Stop is left of the table. Graduated to
.001, with a counter to keep track of distance for full 12" of retraction.

I agree fully with having the DeVlieg bars. Super rigid, super handy. DeVlieg made several accessories to make their machines as productive as possible, just like Moore. In fact, Moore sold DeVlieg bars that fit the Moore spindle.
 
You can put the platen where ever you need. That is why there is an adjustable stop to set where the platen will rapid in and stop.
See all those cast iron chips on the ... it's not the ways, there's some 1950-style covers, but those way covers for the platen don't work all that good. So every time you run the platen out and in to measure a hole, you're dragging that stuff across the covers and against that middle v-way. I've never seen one that wasn't all scarred up. Mine too but at least I tried.

Looking at this setup I'd move the table all the way forward so that cast iron chips don't fall into the moving parts, move the work back, put stop blocks in the t-slots to set the v-block against and you'd barely have to indicate the workholding, and, imnsho, it'd be better for the life of the machine plus faster to set up.

Plus that moveable stop takes forever to crank, if you don't have to, why would you ? Just leave the table forward unless you need to move it back.

But everyone does things their own way ...
 
Last edited:
Thanks for all the comments. Great suggestions. The Devlieg is new to me and I’m still learning.
 
No matter what tho, those things are so much fun to run, don'tcha think ? Everything just feels right ....
That’s always a good sign. “ DSG “ lathes are just the same. The levers just drop in and out so smoothly. Then you get the lathes were you have to jump on the feed lever with a big boot to make it disengage on a heavy cut !

Regards Tyrone
 
I agree on cranking the table stop, and so did DeVlieg. 48" and up are powered.

I have no problem covering the front with chips. After retracting I clean before returning to work position.

The shiny pieces are just to cover the internals. The ways are the steel guide in the center and on each end under the keepers.

And yes, that machine was designed to be as handy as a pocket on a shirt. If a workpiece won't fit in a 6" vise I can prolly finish it faster in that DeVlieg than a Series 1 BP.

One thing to learn is workpieces should be butted against a hard stop tied to either a tee slot or a tendon. Steel on steel is slick and that machine has enough feed force and spindle thrust to push a workpiece around, even when you think the clamps are tight.
 
Last edited:
gbent --

I'm not understanding your use if the word "tendon" in this context. Myguesss would be that you refer to the table slots paralleling the spindle axis, but . . .

Thanks,

John
I think he means “ tenon “. All our vee blocks, fixtures etc were tenoned to pick up off the tee slots in the tables. It makes for quicker setting up as long as the operator is careful placing the vee blocks etc. Most of that sort of equipment had to be lifted into place with the overhead cranes so you had to be careful not to damage to the tee slots.

Regards Tyrone
 
The straight strap clamp across the top of that tube isn’t ideal. You could end up with the bore slightly oval. We used cranked strap clamps that clamped down in more than one place. Pushing the vee blocks up against slot stops gives you a bit more security and enables you to set the vee blocks up easier.

Regards Tyrone
I’m glad I’m not the only one that was worried about the OP’s oval bore!

Glad the Op is sharing photos for us to pick apart. It’s a good way for everyone to learn about better techniques.
 
Yes, I meant tenon. I could blame it on autocorrect, but the fault is really carelessness. A former workplace had vee block clamps made from roller chain. Always thought I should make a couple also, but haven't yet.
 
Yes, I meant tenon. I could blame it on autocorrect, but the fault is really carelessness. A former workplace had vee block clamps made from roller chain. Always thought I should make a couple also, but haven't yet.
Yes, I’d forgotten about those, they are better still. On really big components I’ve known operators use chain blocks ( chain falls in the USA ? )

Regards Tyrone
 
Last edited:
Thanks for answering my question. The possibility of a spelling error didn't cross my mind. And to be honest, I'm not sure that the concept of a tenon fitting into a slot would have gotten through a tenon-into-mortise mindset either.

I generally think of the protrusion on the bottom of a fixture that fits into a slot in a machine table as a key of some sort . . . fixture key, feather key, and slot key have been commonly used in my world, and I've used all of those adjectives myself at one time or another.

Going on to holding a workpiece in a v-block, I've seen several variations on the flexible-strap theme. The ones crossing my mind at the moment are woven-or-braided wire straps, synthetic-fiber straps (both with and without leather faces, and sheetmetal straps that looked for all the world like the metal straps holding fuel tanks to truck-tractors.

John
 
Love my 4k72 also. It's a dream to run
Maybe this pic will cause a stir to those that think perfection in this world is possible 😉
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20210909_105252631.jpg
    IMG_20210909_105252631.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 35
  • IMG_20210909_110103722.jpg
    IMG_20210909_110103722.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 34








 
Back
Top