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Broom making machine

taildrager

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 5, 2012
Location
Ft Valley Ga.
Hello does any one here have any first hand knowledge of broom making machinery .I have two kick winder type and one powered by an electric motor .I am looking for any one that can give me some guidance in this area
Thanks Donny
 
You can watch brooms being made on antique machines and talk to the friendly operator here: Country Craft Store | Shaker Wood Furniture Crafts | Country Craft Store Online I am sure you can learn all there is to know about the kick-type machines there. No electric motors, though. You can call the office to find out when the broom shop is operated.

The Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill, KY has hotel rooms in several of the original historic buildings. We like the Trustee's Office, with rooms on the second floor reached by the most beautiful pair of spiral staircases in America. There is outstanding food in the restaurant on the first floor. All in all, it is a great place to spend a few days. There is much more to see than the broom shop.

Larry
 
Sorry, but the only time I saw brooms being made were at a thrasher show in Illinois. The guy had to grow his own broom corn.
When I was a teen, a neighbor brought back a broom (from Vietnam) similar to the picture I attached (from a friend who just moved to China), and I've always wanted to find one with a long handle.
 
I first found interest in Broom making after stopping in to see these guys in St. Jacobs, Ontario, Canada a decade ago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6-9fDOpoOU

Last I heard, the shop burned down a year or two ago...

Later found out that my cousin was trying to make brooms and had some equipment. I love his huge old electric sewer much more than the simple foot vise type. I hauled some of the hand/foot equipment from southern Illinois for him years ago.
I told him to keep me in mind if he ever decided to part with any of it!

I will forward this thread to him to see if he can offer any help to you.

You should post some pictures of your equipment, as it is definitely an art form.

I tried to grow some Broom Corn Sorghum a couple years, but, was not very successful.

There is a Yahoo group run by a fellow who is seriously experimenting with hybrids that can be machine harvested.

Quick history... supposedly, Ben Franklin found some seeds in a whisk broom that may have come across with a slave.

Pennsylvania became the broom making capital of the world.
Gradually, production moved westward, until Illinois became the Center.
Brooms are still being made there and there is a yearly festival as well.
(please buy an American broom!)

The Center moved to western Kansas, eastern Colorado and Oklahoma.

The stalks must be cut by hand at the proper point for the best product, and every plant grows at a different height.
Cheap labor prevailed and the farmers would bail their best workers out of jail after they spent their paychecks in town at the bars.

When the Government entered and demanded the land owners provide wages, housing and living stations every so many hundred acres, it all just stopped.

From thousands of acres to less than 20 acres registered in the USA a few years ago.

Mexico now grows the majority of Broom Corn and broom making suppliers, like in the Carolinas, buy the stalks from Mexico.

There is specific language in NAFTA on brooms. The USA growers could not compete with Mexican growers, and Mexico argued that there are American companies making plastic brooms.

I don't know why Broom Making strikes me, but, if any one knows of any antique machinery for sale, I may be interested!
Thanks

Mike
 
Granny Weatherwax is the lady to speak to, - though she will tell you ''you can't get the wood these days'' .

Which reminds me that everyone within sight of these words should expose themselves to the magic of Sir Terry Pratchett's words. Yes, he does mention brooms and the brooms have very interesting characters of their own. Start with his book Raising Steam, the funniest sendup of invention and steam locomotives and railway fans (train spotters) you will ever read. Follow up by reading all 40 or so Discworld books.

But, for the machinists, Neal Stephenson's description of a very modern machine shop in Anathem is sheer poetry. And anything he ever wrote is worth reading.

Larry
 
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You might check with the Witches in your area. I hear they are quite knowledgeable in the construction of brooms. :D

So funny, that I forgot to laugh.

Granny Weatherwax is the lady to speak to, - though she will tell you ''you can't get the wood these days'' .

You could substitute bamboo cane for the wooden handle. Less likely to snap. You'd have to experiment a bit and you wouldn't use "young" cane, best bet would probably be bamboo culms harvested at 5 or 6 years and then air dried out of the wind and sun. Phyllostachys pubescens, Moso bamboo would be a superior substitute for broom straw. Should be able to find it in the Ga., contact the USDA Center in Macon for help.

The NJ Ag. Museum had a broom making machine and a guy who came in and made traditional brooms. Unfortunately, thanks to NJ's Gov. Dumb-Ass the museum is closed.
 
So funny, that I forgot to laugh.



You could substitute bamboo cane for the wooden handle. Less likely to snap. You'd have to experiment a bit and you wouldn't use "young" cane, best bet would probably be bamboo culms harvested at 5 or 6 years and then air dried out of the wind and sun. Phyllostachys pubescens, Moso bamboo would be a superior substitute for broom straw. Should be able to find it in the Ga., contact the USDA Center in Macon for help.

The NJ Ag. Museum had a broom making machine and a guy who came in and made traditional brooms. Unfortunately, thanks to NJ's Gov. Dumb-Ass the museum is closed.

So, you're going to tell Granny Weatherwax what to make her broom handles from ? .........................Oh well, at least it won't be me turned in to a toad with it's head permanently jammed up it's own anal passage. :D

P.S. I've used bamboo for broom handles before, and very good it was too. (I'm 6-4 and find most brooms too short for prolonged use)
 
Don't know where you are in Ga., but head to the Bell Witch country near Adams, Tn. They've got a steam and gas engine show there that's pretty good. I still have 2 brooms from the broom maker who shows up there.
 
I make handmade brooms with what is called a broom tying table but have used a manual winder before. I would suggest contacting Shawn Hoefer through his website, http://www.laffing-horse.com. He is the the moderator of our Broommaker's forum. He could definitely provide some insight and possibly put you in touch with artisans in your area.
 
I will have to look into the Bamboo for handles .There is plenty of it around here .

You need the correct species for the handles, there many be several. You can short cut the process by getting help from the guys at the USDA in Macon or if it closer to you, the Coastal Gardens near Savannah. If it were me and I wanted a viable product, that was different (here in the USA) superior and in demand, I'd skip the broom straw and make all bamboo brooms. I'd find someone with a Moso grove and offer to buy the branches when they harvest and strip the canes.
 
Hello does any one here have any first hand knowledge of broom making machinery .I have two kick winder type and one powered by an electric motor .I am looking for any one that can give me some guidance in this area
Thanks Donny

a good friend of mine was the broomaker at canton texas last 25 years
he has passed away
I helped build both kicker and electric broom tying machines for my friend
I can show you how to make a broom
bert seale 1-337-515-2964
 








 
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