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Brother Speedio vs Okuma M560-V

Thanks for all the comments guys - should have a final update probably Monday/Tuesday, and then a new-machine-day post a few weeks after that. Yamazen did come back with some sugar and honey which actually might let me splurge a bit on a 4th axis which would let me run some parts hands-off in multi-unit fixtures which I currently make in smaller fixtures and manually index. It would also open up some new possibilities for products I've held off bringing to market because I didn't have sufficient margin to outsource complex machining but didn't have the capability in-house.

Re: 30 vs 40 taper...Honestly, I've never pushed my machines to their limits and I think I could take almost every program I currently run on the my 40-taper VMC and run it as-is on the 30-taper Brother. Not because I am wussing out on my machining strategies, but because I am overwhelmingly doing pretty small parts and there's only so hard you can push any endmill in plastic. I rough acrylic (3D toolpath) with a 3/4" 4-flute HSS endmill that varies from 1/4" to 1" DOC @ 6000RPM/60IPM and I bet the exact same toolpath would run on the brother with no problem... except I'd either be able to run it at max RPM or, worst case, see where the torque peak is and run it there.
 
Thanks for all the comments guys - should have a final update probably Monday/Tuesday, and then a new-machine-day post a few weeks after that. Yamazen did come back with some sugar and honey which actually might let me splurge a bit on a 4th axis which would let me run some parts hands-off in multi-unit fixtures which I currently make in smaller fixtures and manually index. It would also open up some new possibilities for products I've held off bringing to market because I didn't have sufficient margin to outsource complex machining but didn't have the capability in-house.

Re: 30 vs 40 taper...Honestly, I've never pushed my machines to their limits and I think I could take almost every program I currently run on the my 40-taper VMC and run it as-is on the 30-taper Brother. Not because I am wussing out on my machining strategies, but because I am overwhelmingly doing pretty small parts and there's only so hard you can push any endmill in plastic. I rough acrylic (3D toolpath) with a 3/4" 4-flute HSS endmill that varies from 1/4" to 1" DOC @ 6000RPM/60IPM and I bet the exact same toolpath would run on the brother with no problem... except I'd either be able to run it at max RPM or, worst case, see where the torque peak is and run it there.

I don't know you can get a 3/4" holder with a Bt30..?
 
I don't know you can get a 3/4" holder with a Bt30..?
Sure you can, Mari-Tool has them, nice and short, 2" gage length IIRC. I run them as needed.
I usually stay 1/2 and small and let-r-rip, but there are times I run a 3/4, and 1.5 DOC, doing some moderately light profiling. A nice sharp YG is the good stuff when I do that. :)
 
Honestly, I've never pushed my machines to their limits and I think I could take almost every program I currently run on the my 40-taper VMC and run it as-is on the 30-taper Brother. Not because I am wussing out on my machining strategies, but because I am overwhelmingly doing pretty small parts and there's only so hard you can push any endmill in plastic.
To me, this just screams "Brother!". We are in the same boat with our small plastic parts, and it is jaw dropping how big a time difference there is between our VF-2ss and the R650, even when using only one pallet for a short run. I'll hand a very lazy program off to my foreman and tell him not to expect much. Then he'll come in the office after it's running and tell me the parts are running 30-40% faster than on the Haas. Put some effort in to that same program and what in amazement. If outright material removal rates are not what drives your daily operations, a Brother will kick the ass of anything out there that I'm aware of.

Oh, and our parts look nicer and are more accurate. And the machine uses less than half the electricity the Haas does. And no way oil so coolant stays nicer. And broken tool detection is less than 2 seconds per tool. And the ergonomics of the Brothers is much better than our Haas. And they are way quieter. And the control is nicer (yeah I said it...) And you can stack the machines closer together. And Brother / Yamazen support is amazing (need PLC ladder customized to implement some goofy thing you want to do? No problem!)
 
To me, this just screams "Brother!". We are in the same boat with our small plastic parts, and it is jaw dropping how big a time difference there is between our VF-2ss and the R650, even when using only one pallet for a short run. I'll hand a very lazy program off to my foreman and tell him not to expect much. Then he'll come in the office after it's running and tell me the parts are running 30-40% faster than on the Haas. Put some effort in to that same program and what in amazement. If outright material removal rates are not what drives your daily operations, a Brother will kick the ass of anything out there that I'm aware of.

Oh, and our parts look nicer and are more accurate. And the machine uses less than half the electricity the Haas does. And no way oil so coolant stays nicer. And broken tool detection is less than 2 seconds per tool. And the ergonomics of the Brothers is much better than our Haas. And they are way quieter. And the control is nicer (yeah I said it...) And you can stack the machines closer together. And Brother / Yamazen support is amazing (need PLC ladder customized to implement some goofy thing you want to do? No problem!)

Wow thats a pretty solid endorsement for what the OP wants to do. Looks like a no-brainer...
 
To me, this just screams "Brother!". We are in the same boat with our small plastic parts, and it is jaw dropping how big a time difference there is between our VF-2ss and the R650, even when using only one pallet for a short run. I'll hand a very lazy program off to my foreman and tell him not to expect much. Then he'll come in the office after it's running and tell me the parts are running 30-40% faster than on the Haas. Put some effort in to that same program and what in amazement. If outright material removal rates are not what drives your daily operations, a Brother will kick the ass of anything out there that I'm aware of.

Oh, and our parts look nicer and are more accurate. And the machine uses less than half the electricity the Haas does. And no way oil so coolant stays nicer. And broken tool detection is less than 2 seconds per tool. And the ergonomics of the Brothers is much better than our Haas. And they are way quieter. And the control is nicer (yeah I said it...) And you can stack the machines closer together. And Brother / Yamazen support is amazing (need PLC ladder customized to implement some goofy thing you want to do? No problem!)

WhaaaYy?? Seriously? I don't know the Brother (only a Robodrill from years ago), and NO ONE could beat a Haas control... (operator standpoint- touching tools, offsets, etc)
 
I will say this about brothers versus other machines. Since all machines have door locks these days. Brother has the best system to poke your head in the machine to see what is going on.

Just open the door, and everything stops.
close the door hit cycle start, machines turns on spindle and goes back to work.

My matsuura hplsu300.
-Feed hold
-Turn key to setup
-Open door
-Close door
-Turn key to manual
-Click to handle
-Push the spindle clockwise button
-Turn key to automatic
-Click to memory
-Cycle start.
 
I will say this about brothers versus other machines. Since all machines have door locks these days. Brother has the best system to poke your head in the machine to see what is going on.

Just open the door, and everything stops.
close the door hit cycle start, machines turns on spindle and goes back to work.

My matsuura hplsu300.
-Feed hold
-Turn key to setup
-Open door
-Close door
-Turn key to manual
-Click to handle
-Push the spindle clockwise button
-Turn key to automatic
-Click to memory
-Cycle start.

On a Haas, wait unitl end of tool/cycle
open door, do whatyouwant,
close door, hit cycle start... :D
 
WhaaaYy?? Seriously? I don't know the Brother (only a Robodrill from years ago), and NO ONE could beat a Haas control... (operator standpoint- touching tools, offsets, etc)

On a Haas, wait unitl end of tool/cycle
open door, do whatyouwant,
close door, hit cycle start... :D
You may want to get your hands on a modern Brother before you go too much further. We have one of each, right side by side, and within 2 weeks the operators, the setup guy and the programmer ALL preferred the Brother.

I learned CNC machining on this very same Haas, and my setup guy learned operating and setup on the machine as well. I could not have been more biased toward Haas when I bought the Brother, but now I can't wait to sell the Haas. If Haas works for you, that's great. Mine has been pretty damn good for me, and it will be a sad day when it goes out the door. But how about not fucking up somebody else's thread because somebody reports facts that you don't like to hear.
 
On a Haas, wait unitl end of tool/cycle
open door, do whatyouwant,
close door, hit cycle start... :D

So when that new expensive endmill is a hair away from your hard jaws and your not 100% sure and want to BE SURE, how do you do that on your Haas?

On my Brother I open the door, slide shim stock or a scale under the endmill, close the doors, look at my distance to go, and hit cycle start.
 
So when that new expensive endmill is a hair away from your hard jaws and your not 100% sure and want to BE SURE, how do you do that on your Haas?

On my Brother I open the door, slide shim stock or a scale under the endmill, close the doors, look at my distance to go, and hit cycle start.

When HAAS removed setting 51, they removed me as a customer, LOL :stirthepot:
 
You may want to get your hands on a modern Brother before you go too much further. We have one of each, right side by side, and within 2 weeks the operators, the setup guy and the programmer ALL preferred the Brother.

I learned CNC machining on this very same Haas, and my setup guy learned operating and setup on the machine as well. I could not have been more biased toward Haas when I bought the Brother, but now I can't wait to sell the Haas. If Haas works for you, that's great. Mine has been pretty damn good for me, and it will be a sad day when it goes out the door. But how about not fucking up somebody else's thread because somebody reports facts that you don't like to hear.

How did I "fuck up someones thread"?? :confused:

Also, if you don't understand this, what YOU say is no more 'fact' than what I say. :rolleyes5: Control preference is just that, I'm sure some guys love their 5-10-15 year old fanucyasnacmach3siemens, more power to 'em.
 
So when that new expensive endmill is a hair away from your hard jaws and your not 100% sure and want to BE SURE, how do you do that on your Haas?

On my Brother I open the door, slide shim stock or a scale under the endmill, close the doors, look at my distance to go, and hit cycle start.


Pretty sure our newest Haas (2016'ish) you can hit feed hold and open the doors and the spindle drops to 750 and the coolant shuts off. Or are you doing this while the tool is cutting/feeding?! I don't think the door locks are actually locked unless it is in cycle running. If I remember I will check Monday. The older machines are similar, but the coolant doesn't stop automatically, have to hit the coolant button.
 








 
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