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bugatti vice

Bentleys were considered truck like,and were referred to as "The fastest lorries in Europe".

I read the Bugatti book many years ago,and could be remembering some things wrong.

Did they ever figure out how Bugatti made those tricky HOLLOW front axles?
 
I will check my library tonight to refresh my memory. I also have a dvd that I think was issued by the society.

Lee (the saw guy)
 
neilho --

Bugatti vises are clamped to the bench by a single stud. The stud, at the center of the mounting flange, passes through the workbench where it engages a sliding-T-handle nut. To swivel the vise, the T-handle clamping nut is loosened, the vise swiveled, and the clamping nut re-tightened.

None of that oh-so-unsightly hold-down hardware is visible from the top side.

John

John-

I was aware of the center pin and some sort of nut holding the vise down, but not the details. Thanks.

Most vise swiveling systems slip when bending parallel to the bench (the prevalent Columbian system of two T-nuts sliding in the base comes to mind), so I'm partial to vises that are rigidly fastened, preferably with 3 bolts. I doubt the Bugatti was meant to pass the "Neilanderthal test" .

neil
 
oldster;2860007 Ettore was certainly unique in his own way of doing things. For example said:
A man ahead of his time. Camshafts are, once again, made that way.
 
gwilson asked; Did they ever figure out how Bugatti made those tricky HOLLOW front axles?

Pomeroy, describing the Type 35 Bugatti in The Grand Prix Car, says that;

(The front axle) is a unique design, being hollow, of double diameter and yet of single-piece construction. There is a large-section hole between the front springs and one of very much smaller diameter between the springs and the stub-axle bearing. This apparent miracle of machining was accomplished by boring the axle right through with a large-diameter drill as an initial operation, shaping it, closing up the outer portions and then finally redrilling with a smaller diameter cutter.
 
The NC Art Museum in Raleigh has a car exhibit with a re creation of a one off Bugatti that disappeared on its way back from a car show in the middle 1930s.

The Atlantic body Type 57S featured flowing coupe lines with a pronounced dorsal seam running front to back. It was based on the 1935 Aérolithe concept car designed by Jean Bugatti. Like the Type 59 Grand Prix car, the Aérolithe used Elektron (a magnesium alloy) or Duralumin (an aluminium alloy) for its body panels. Therefore, the body panels were riveted externally, creating the signature seam.

Scroll down through the site and click on the cars for more photos.

Rolling Sculpture: Art Deco Cars from the 193�s and ’4�s | North Carolina Museum of Art

My daughter took me to the show for my birthday. I was enchanted.

Bugatti also made rail cars powered by the 12 liter straight 8 engines he used in the Bugatti Royales.

Bugatti rail cars - Google Search

His personal Royale had a 14 liter straight 8. All the ones sold to Kings and Potentates had the 12 liter.

bugatti royale - Google Search

Bugatti Royale - Wikipedia

And:

Collection Schlumpf, mulhouse - Google Search

I'm fascinated with huge 1920s & 30s cars, Bugattis in particular.

Paul
 
Yes - OP spelled it vice in the title. :)

Paul - More than 30 of the Bugattis in the original Schlumpf collection actually came from the USA. They had been collected by John Shakespeare and the Schlumpf's bought them on condition that they were "perfect" consmetically and mechanically - for something less than $105,000 for all of them including the Park Ward Royale. ($105,000 asked, $70,000 offered, deal somewhere in between?) less than $3,000/car in 1962.

smt
 
gwilson asked; Did they ever figure out how Bugatti made those tricky HOLLOW front axles?

Pomeroy, describing the Type 35 Bugatti in The Grand Prix Car, says that;

(The front axle) is a unique design, being hollow, of double diameter and yet of single-piece construction. There is a large-section hole between the front springs and one of very much smaller diameter between the springs and the stub-axle bearing. This apparent miracle of machining was accomplished by boring the axle right through with a large-diameter drill as an initial operation, shaping it, closing up the outer portions and then finally redrilling with a smaller diameter cutter.
"Pur Sang", a company in Argentina makes faithful replicas of vintage Bugattis, airplanes (Avro 504) and one-offs like some large Fiat racer for Jay Leno's collection. Among many other mechanical oddities, they are actually making those weird front Bugatti axles just like the originals.
 
Following up on my earlier post with a bit more info:



Message body
The vices in the current article have been prettryfied and were not in typical use in the shop.
One of the images in the book show a shot of a workbench, and it is a cluttered jumble of stuff. The vise is mounted on it, but is being used, not draped in silk :-).

In 1999, for my birthday, MSO gave me air fare to Cleveland, where the Museum of Art was hosting an exhibition that featured the three generations of the family:

Carlo 1855-1940
Furniture designer extraordinaire.

Rembrandt 1884-1916
Primarily a sculptor of animals, but also did humans.
His version of a sitting male figure is every bit as powerful as Rodin's "The Thinker".

Ettore 1881-1947
Jean 1909-1939
Automobile designers

Jean (the son, was killed in an accident during a road test).

Books (only two of hundreds)

"Carlo-Rembrandt-Ettore-Jean
Bugatti"
ISBN 0-8478-0446-1

"Bugatti"
The Cleveland Museum of Art
ISBN 0-940717-56-5

I have always been fascinated by the family. There was an incredible burst of creativity that exploded in a section of France that simply disappeared when they died (never to be seen again).
I am still inspired by them.

Lee (the saw guy)
 
Hi Stephen...well, the old saying says "great minds muddle the same puddle" :-)

I never expected to see the cars that were displayed at that show.

The art deco sense of design and elegance displayed has been a sustaining influence in my work for more than 70 years.

Lee (the saw guy)
 
Re the front axle; the Type 35 was perhaps the ultimate expression of this particular axle design.

In early years, front axles were usually of H-section (or I-section, depending on how you look at it) but the advent of front brakes required the axles to be much stronger and larger H-sections were heavy as well as being non-ideal to resist the forces.

The 1922 Fiat GP car had a tubular axle that resembles that of the later (1924) Type 35; it had a tubular centre section, a square "hole" for each spring to pass-through, and solid circular sections from the springs to the wheel ends.

The axle was in two halves, split at the centre; this allowed boring-out of the centre section and joining the two halves with a spline and pins.

Bugatti improved on this with his unique method described earlier that reduced weight even further by boring the outer axle sections.

The process was labour-intensive but that was typical of le Patron; not such a big deal in those days when the necessary skills in forging were probably more-common than they would be today.

I think that one maker in this era (I can't remember who) made a similarly-hollow axle in three sections, inner and two outer, joined by circular flanges and bolts; this would have simplified boring-out the hollow section but added unsprung weight with the flanges and bolts.

Bugatti was very intent on lightness and stiffness for all components and his cars were very light for their time.

Since it's the ratio of sprung/unsprung weight that matters, low unsprung weight was more necessary in the Type 35 than it was in les camions le plus vite, which used a substantial "girder" front axle.
 
Have you heard about the Bugatti racing airplane that was discovered several years ago? I think it was intended for some race,but the war(WWII) got in the way,and it was never used.

I heard that a Bugatti restorer got hold of it,and took the motor and used it in a Bugatti car he was restoring. Too bad,really. I have no idea what happened to the rest of the plane.
 








 
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