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Butcher-block workbench top repair?

henrya

Stainless
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Location
TN
Don’t get too fancy here. Rip it, check the fit by eye and if it closes up nice, use tite bond. If not use epoxy. Clamp per standard procedure for the stickem you use and go on with life.

First cut with right side against fence to cut away all the material to the left of the crack, then move the fence just enough to clean up the right side of the crack. You use the same edge against the fence both cuts. It will likely close up fine. I’d epoxy it, partly because I have it on hand and its perfectly suited to this particular job.
 

Tony Quiring

Titanium
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Location
Madera county california usa
I would clamp a straight edge (plywood) on table and rip full length with saw.

Place so it cuts full length, just kissing side of split, sharp carbide blade needed.

Do same on other side so fresh wood whole length.

Run over jointer to insure perfect.

Glue up with titebond, make sure you clamp guides top to bottom to keep it aligned. Maybe add some biscuits to do this.

Sand and reseal.

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

janc

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Location
NW Ca USA
Some of the butcher block work tables are held together with steel rods, as well as being glued, the ends of the rods are covered by the outside strip of wood, might want to check that out before ripping.
 

henrya

Stainless
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Location
TN
Some of the butcher block work tables are held together with steel rods, as well as being glued, the ends of the rods are covered by the outside strip of wood, might want to check that out before ripping.

Fortunately it is cracked open so easy to look for metal. I have seen little wavy metal joiner pieces in glue ups like this. Look closely.
 

thermite

Diamond
Some of the butcher block work tables are held together with steel rods, as well as being glued, the ends of the rods are covered by the outside strip of wood, might want to check that out before ripping.

Well a laminated wood worktable or a laminated "cutting board".. and a true BUTCHER block are totally different animals, but yes.

Dad built his worktop by crossdrilling Oak every 4 inches for 3/8" Allthread. Then just kept it all torqued. No adhesive was ever used at all.

A "Butcher" wants vertical laminations so only and ever end grain is presented to the blade. Their 'tops' are usually as deep as they are wide. Or more so.

Use of Biocidal wood is the other part. It hasn't been all that long that health-scare folks discovered that "the right woods" will kill bacteria that plastic cutting boards do not.

As usual... "primitive man" had already known this .....for about 12 thousand years. Of course we had to await the internet before "the word 'got around by anything faster than tongue of Mother to Daughter...

:)
 

RODELU

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Uruguay
If I understand correctly it’s a table on which work will be performed, it’s not a showpiece.
No ripping needed, leave the table as is.
I would use a router to make a cavity as straight as possible, of the right width, a little longer than the crack and would fill that cavity with a piece of wood, glued in place. Sanding or scraping afterwards. Your opportunity to refinish the whole table.
 

blcksmth

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Location
Bowling Green, Ohio
Find some scrap wood of the same kind and color as the top and create some sawdust from it. Mix sawdust with glue and completely fill the crack with it. Scrape or sand smooth.

Bob
WB8NQW
 

rons

Diamond
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Location
California, USA
I was also considering splitting the top on the table saw and re-gluing, but that goes against my lazy approach philosophy.
Cut some maple strips and glue them into the slots. Plane them down. Done. Would most likely look like nothing ever happened.

Or use the Nakashima butterfly method to keep the cracks from moving. Use ebony Blackwood for effect.

 
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