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Buying a Schaublin 135

Degull

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Location
Toronto Canada
I know the extra gear set is the same on both lathes. I only have the stock set that came equipped on the lathe.
The 135 and 150 are very similar, I imagine there are many parts that can be swapped between the two.
 

barbter

Diamond
Joined
Oct 27, 2007
Location
On Tour...
I double your money :D

For spares you could also ask Ruemema
Drehmaschinen von Ruemema
He is one of 2 I am aware of that is capable of rebuilding a 135 to original or better specs Also a very helpfull person
But be aware his solutions for a problem are always 110% Expensive many times therefore His machines can be discribed as conventional hard turning machines


Peter

His site oooozes quality and craftsmanship!
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
That site certainly shows what can be done if you have time, expertise and deep pockets I suspect!
I have a question, colours, not sure which way to go here, the machine is a light silver blue colour, guess that is its factory colour but do see others like the green, white with dark grey cabinet etc...
Personally not keen on the green nor the colour it is right now, like the white top half and dark grey bottom but wondered if there is any issues with value of these machines should you decide to change the colour from the original factory coating?

Any other colour options as see the new machines are white/red now which is nice as it reflects the Swiss flag colours, would a 135 look good in white and red and how maybe would that combination best be applied?

Marc
 

hansvandongen

Aluminum
Joined
May 10, 2005
Location
Rotterdam, Netherlands
IMO a repaint job on an old machine always looks worse than leaving the original paint. Unless. My vote is for cleaning the machine drastically and letting it be. If you go the Ruemema route and get the geometry back to better then new: then a repaint job (which takes ages when done right, and means dismantling to the rough castings etc.) might be in order.

Still: cleanup first, then assess. IMHO, of course.

Hans
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2005
Location
The Netherlands
IMO a repaint job on an old machine always looks worse than leaving the original paint. Unless. My vote is for cleaning the machine drastically and letting it be. If you go the Ruemema route and get the geometry back to better then new: then a repaint job (which takes ages when done right, and means dismantling to the rough castings etc.) might be in order.

Still: cleanup first, then assess. IMHO, of course.

Hans


The ruemema route will cost him about €50000 to €60000 if not more
He does not restore these for stock anymore Only if ordered And his prices went way up

Peter
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
50-60,0000 is madness for a 50 year old lathe, does not matter how accurate it is human error will be more of an issue IMO.
I'll see how it cleans up mechanically, I'm not after silly accuracy just something decent, if its like the Hardinge HLV I had that will be fine.
I have a friend who does body repairs and has a paintshop so access to painting and prep work is not a problem and should be relatively cost effective as I can use the sandblasting equipment and can spray paint as used to race and restore Aston Martin cars, might get one of the workshop guys to do the filler and sanding as don't like that job!
 
Last edited:

barbter

Diamond
Joined
Oct 27, 2007
Location
On Tour...
50-60,0000 is madness for a 50 year old lathe, does not matter how accurate it is human error will be more of an issue IMO.

It is a lot of money, but for a business it's a tax write-off. And one heck of a nice machine to have!
He makes a great point on his site - obvious, but great point:-
It is obvious why small, conventional new machines in the precision class Leinen DLZ, Schaublin 135, 150, 160 new are no longer (cannot) be produced:
the market for them is simply too small. In addition, a CNC lathe is much simpler and, depending on the complexity of the control, even cheaper to manufacture than a good conventional lathe with a high-quality 3-axis digital display.


A flat bed cnc (teach style machine) doesn't need a compound slide, gearbox or drivetrain, feed shafts, headstock rpm gearbox/variator as applicable etc etc.
There's lots of "obsolete" parts on a 135, compared to a 2axis with a teach cnc control on it, which all gets added into the whole rebuild costings.
:cheers:
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2005
Location
The Netherlands
I did ask him who bought his machines and why He told me his machines are used as manual hard turning machines
Many of his customers are in the optical industrie As a example he told me of a compagny makiking opticals for sniper riffles
These have to be light So made out of aluminium Anodized But then they have to machine the seat of the lenzes To a very high accuray but without going through the anadized layer Pocketgrinding is very difficult So they do it with a diamant tool on a Schaublin 150 of his

Peter
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
Been quiet sorry as planning the machine move but thought I would update on project.

Been cleaning down the Multifix tool post, size A and what appears to be a genuine item, the tool post is in good condition but the threaded bolt that looks like it was made to suit the Multifix needs re-making as the shaft is worn and loose and the threads that locate in the carriage base plate are damaged. Will get this re-made, hopefully a fairly easy job and post the results.

Making contacts at Schaublin UK and they are putting me in touch with a private machinist guy who knows these machines very well, he is located 30 minutes from me so hoping this contact will be able to give me advise when I start the project proper.
 

ole.steen

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jun 11, 2002
Location
Oslo, Norway
A very nice buy! I have restored and own a 135 from around the same era, (1974). Are you sure yours is from 1970? One important difference is the spindle bearings. If you have the rounded top spindle housing, it indicates the old bearing style (cylindrical rollers and ball thrust bearings), while a squared off housing top indicates the newer type, with 3 angular contact ball bearings behind the chuck, introduced between -70 and -74. Your lathe looks to be in reasonable state, especially if there is no rust on the ways (as it looks). Feel free to ask me any details, I'll try to help as best I can.
Ole
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
Ole many thanks for the info and offer for help. I have come across some very in the know people around the world and a few here in the UK which is great, looking forward to starting the work to clean it up.
Picture of the spindle housing and rusty old chuck, which type is it?
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_1acc.jpg
 

ole.steen

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jun 11, 2002
Location
Oslo, Norway
Aha! This is the pre-1974 type with the roller and thrust- bearing. It may well be 1970 as you presumed. The guy with the utmost knowledge of these machines is Rüdiger Krämer. He is a professional machine restorer, and lives in Germany. I myself is a retired psychiatrist with a passion for machines as a hobby. Here is my 135, i have restored it myself: https://1drv.ms/u/s!AixuXkj7rT9J1nu3c5qDb24-yJId?e=hYvzdy

Ole
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
Ole nice work sir, I have a couple of questions.
1- I notice all your handles have what look like new covers, red and black, can you explain if they are new ones from Schaublin or did you make them or another solution?
2- The base cabinet, how much work was needed to get it to a good condition to paint and what paint method did you use?

Lovely work and hope I can achieve 50% of your result...

Marc
 

Martin P

Stainless
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
currently Belgium
Nice buy!
My experience with Schaublin as a company:
I could use some small parts for my 160s.
So I called their German location. They berated me for owning such old crap (I am not kidding), but told me to mail them the serial numbers and they would see if they could help me with some parts or a manual.
I mailed them the serial numbers and proceeded to never hear from them again.
 

thermite

Diamond
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Location
Sol, Terra
Nice buy!
My experience with Schaublin as a company:
I could use some small parts for my 160s.
So I called their German location. They berated me for owning such old crap (I am not kidding), but told me to mail them the serial numbers and they would see if they could help me with some parts or a manual.
I mailed them the serial numbers and proceeded to never hear from them again.

What did you expect?

You are German.

Schaublin are Swiss.

And how long did it take Henri Guisan to find volunteers willing to KEEP it that way, damn the cost?

I must go through a non-American middleman to get parts out of Cazeneuve, France, too.

This is new news?
 

marcsO

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Location
SURREY
Martin if you want I can supply you with a contact at Schaublin UK who is super helpful and I am sure will help you out on parts etc, he was very complimentary of my 1970 135 he only juddered when I mentioned I had a Hardinge HLV before :)

Marc
 

thermite

Diamond
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Location
Sol, Terra
Martin if you want I can supply you with a contact at Schaublin UK who is super helpful and I am sure will help you out on parts etc, he was very complimentary of my 1970 135 he only juddered when I mentioned I had a Hardinge HLV before :)

Marc

ROFL! Similar reaction having owned two BMW's (never-the-f**k AGAIN, thanks!) and now a Jaguar XJ and a Range-Rover. "Pre-Japper doorstop wedge styled" models as well. "Real ones", rather!

For BMW, that was the 507 ...or even previous... as their high water mark. Maybe the Dixie? Or even the Isseta?

:D
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2005
Location
The Netherlands
Ruemema told me that overhauling a 160 is so very expensive because almost no parts were available
Did Schaublin go bankrupt at some point Wasn`t there a auction at some time??

Peter
 

Martin P

Stainless
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
currently Belgium
I could use some standard parts, but the swiss made things just a little different.
Like the crank handles, not the ame as others.
The rubber on top of the headstock is 5mm thick instead of the usual 2 mm. Where to get this?
On the top of the headstock there is an oil glas shaped like a bulb. One would think this is a standard part, but no, some swiss thing only known within sight of the Matterhorn I guess.
But then Deckel mostly used suppliers from within a 100km around Munich. But at least that is DIN country.

I do not know the Ruemema guy. Judging by his website he must be....lets say...."difficult".
 








 
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