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CAM Recommendation for Haas NGC lineup

Agrizama

Plastic
Joined
Jun 16, 2024
Location
Indonesia
Hi,
I'm looking for CAM software that can handle our CNC lineup from Haas using NGC.
We have UMC-750, ST20Y and 3 axis machine.
Currently, we are using Powermill Standard and Fusion 360.
We have a plan to buy only 1 license to replace Powermill and Fusion 360 that can cover from turnmill to 5 axis simultan.
What Is recommended software to cover our lineup?
Thanks
 
Hi,
I'm looking for CAM software that can handle our CNC lineup from Haas using NGC.
We have UMC-750, ST20Y and 3 axis machine.
Currently, we are using Powermill Standard and Fusion 360.
We have a plan to buy only 1 license to replace Powermill and Fusion 360 that can cover from turnmill to 5 axis simultan.
What Is recommended software to cover our lineup?
Thanks
Everyone has a different opinion and everyone thinks their opinion is the best. But do your own research directly from the providers, as well as people who have actually USED multiple products in order to get a meaningful comparison. Remember also, that the popularity of a CAD/CAM package doesn't necessarily correlate to its value. Some of the most popular systems are the most outdated and least capable (relative to their cost and their peers). They're popular because of inertia (were once top-of-the-line, not anymore, but remain widely used because switching is sometimes harder to do for bureaucratic reasons than putting up with limitations), or they're popular because they spent all their money on marketing and sweetheart deals with schools, instead of enhancing the capability and usability their software to keep up with changing technology.

As for my opinion, having used a variety of systems: Topsolid will more than cover all your bases and is typically on par with or slightly less expensive than the more popular options. It's fully integrated CAD/CAM/PDM, so you have one license from one vendor that covers everything you need to do, including fixture design, machine simulation, mill/turn, and 5-axis. Perfect seamless CAD/CAM integration, and a unified interface / workflow across milling, turning, and multi-task machining. Their Haas posts are well established and rock solid, and they're constantly developing and deploying new and useful features to make users' lives better.
Here's a recent thread talking about it:
 
You're in Indonesia. I would imagine the answer is going to depend more on what kind of support you will get from your local provider. You're going to need some specialized machine definitions and post processors for the lathe and the UMC. I would make sure you can get good help from your reseller and ask other customers in your local market.

We have one ongoing thread here where the buyer claims the seller promised a working post processor and despite what we all think, the customer is still not happy about the purchase.
 
Everyone has a different opinion and everyone thinks their opinion is the best. But do your own research directly from the providers, as well as people who have actually USED multiple products in order to get a meaningful comparison. Remember also, that the popularity of a CAD/CAM package doesn't necessarily correlate to its value. Some of the most popular systems are the most outdated and least capable (relative to their cost and their peers). They're popular because of inertia (were once top-of-the-line, not anymore, but remain widely used because switching is sometimes harder to do for bureaucratic reasons than putting up with limitations), or they're popular because they spent all their money on marketing and sweetheart deals with schools, instead of enhancing the capability and usability their software to keep up with changing technology.

As for my opinion, having used a variety of systems: Topsolid will more than cover all your bases and is typically on par with or slightly less expensive than the more popular options. It's fully integrated CAD/CAM/PDM, so you have one license from one vendor that covers everything you need to do, including fixture design, machine simulation, mill/turn, and 5-axis. Perfect seamless CAD/CAM integration, and a unified interface / workflow across milling, turning, and multi-task machining. Their Haas posts are well established and rock solid, and they're constantly developing and deploying new and useful features to make users' lives better.
Here's a recent thread talking about it:
Thanks for your advise. I will check the local provider of Topsolid due to this software is unfamiliar with us.
 
Another happy TS user here (in the USA)-definitely worth a look in my humble opinion. Very complete and capable package....
 
You're in Indonesia. I would imagine the answer is going to depend more on what kind of support you will get from your local provider. You're going to need some specialized machine definitions and post processors for the lathe and the UMC. I would make sure you can get good help from your reseller and ask other customers in your local market.

We have one ongoing thread here where the buyer claims the seller promised a working post processor and despite what we all think, the customer is still not happy about the purchase.
The primary reason for needing to change our software is that the current post-processor is not fine-tuned for the UMC and ST20Y machines. Additionally, we require software capable of 5-axis simultaneous operation.

We have encountered several issues with the post-processor on the UMC. Recently, a significant problem occurred during drilling in a 3+2 positioning mode. The drill failed to retract to a safe position before returning to the home position and subsequently moved along the Y-axis while still inside the hole. This issue only arises when we post the program with the ATC. When we separate the holemaking program from the ATC, the drill movement operates correctly. Unfortunately, the local provider has been unable to resolve this issue.

Given these challenges, should we consider purchasing a G-Code simulator like Vericut for verification purposes?
 
We have encountered several issues with the post-processor on the UMC. Recently, a significant problem occurred during drilling in a 3+2 positioning mode. The drill failed to retract to a safe position before returning to the home position and subsequently moved along the Y-axis while still inside the hole. This issue only arises when we post the program with the ATC. When we separate the holemaking program from the ATC, the drill movement operates correctly. Unfortunately, the local provider has been unable to resolve this issue.
Have you posted this in the HSM/Fusion post processor forum? I've had excellent help there, I bet someone could solve that in a hurry.
 
Recently, a significant problem occurred during drilling in a 3+2 positioning mode. The drill failed to retract to a safe position before returning to the home position and subsequently moved along the Y-axis while still inside the hole. This issue only arises when we post the program with the ATC. When we separate the holemaking program from the ATC, the drill movement operates correctly.
Sorry if I'm missing something here: ATC = automatic tool changer? Posting this out as a single-tool program gives no problem but, calling for a tool change does the behavior you described?

Does it post proper canned drill cycles or does it just brute force everything with G01 commands for every step? A drill cycle should have a retract plane and it shouldn't do anything in Y until the drill is properly out of the hole. You also need to give it some extra room out of the hole. In other words: don't command an XY move at 0.1mm above the hole. It needs some clearance or it may start anticipating the XY move as it's coming up in Z. It can try to cut the corner and cause issues.
 
The primary reason for needing to change our software is that the current post-processor is not fine-tuned for the UMC and ST20Y machines. Additionally, we require software capable of 5-axis simultaneous operation.

We have encountered several issues with the post-processor on the UMC. Recently, a significant problem occurred during drilling in a 3+2 positioning mode. The drill failed to retract to a safe position before returning to the home position and subsequently moved along the Y-axis while still inside the hole. This issue only arises when we post the program with the ATC. When we separate the holemaking program from the ATC, the drill movement operates correctly. Unfortunately, the local provider has been unable to resolve this issue.

Given these challenges, should we consider purchasing a G-Code simulator like Vericut for verification purposes?
You could get Vericut. It's solid software, and can simulate anything, but it's difficult to set up initially, and in my opinion, it's much better to start with a CAM software that has robust simulation and good post processors. The main value-add for Vericut, in my personal opinion, is their Force and Opti-Path modules, which are used for optimizing material removal rates and cutter load, while reducing air cutting time. It's expensive. VERY expensive. But worthwhile for reducing cycle time and improving tool life on production parts.

In your specific situation (3+2 drilling), one of the strengths of Topsolid is that you have full control over link movements between operations, including the ability to SIMULATE those link movements with full collision checking. I'm unaware of any other software that gives that kind of control to the user. Everyone else uses auto-generated links or worse, uses the post processor to handle link movements, resulting in code that the programmer CAN'T evaluate before posting. Once a post is properly proven out in Topsolid, what you simulate on the screen is EXACTLY what the machine will do. No more and no less. The post isn't even really all that interesting. It just translates the internal path into G-code. It doesn't add anything or assume anything.
 








 
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