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Can A Cold Saw be Run Without Flood Coolant?

projectnut

Stainless
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Location
Wisconsin
Recently I picked up a used (11 years old) Baileigh CS-350-EU cold saw. I'm in the cleanup stage and getting ready to reassemble it. The saw has been used in a production situation since new and is now covered in dried and semi dried water-based coolant. At this point I've removed several pounds of slimy crud from just about every surface on the machine. It's going fairly well, but I'd like to not have to go through the process on a regular basis.

When reassembled the saw will be used as a backup for my Startrite horizontal bandsaw. As such it will probably get less than 5 hours a month runtime. I dislike water-based flood coolants in that they always seem to stagnate and smell over time, make a mess on the shop floor, and require the machine to be disassembled and cleaned on a somewhat regular basis. For the limited use this machine will get I'm considering the use of a stick lubricant like Cut Ease, or a manual or automated spray mist system. Has anyone tried this, and if so, what were the results?
 

memphisjed

Stainless
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Location
Memphis
Look at the blade charts. Most blades have speed feed for dry cutting. Usually about half speed feed. Hss blade so guessing 40 sfm or something.
 

LOTT

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Cold saws really do need coolant. We use Trim E206 and it can sit for a while without ill effects.
 

M. Moore

Titanium
Joined
Jun 8, 2007
Location
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
I have a Startrite horizontal bandsaw and it is a backup for my cold saws so it gets less than 1 hour use per month. Put coolant in and use the saw to cut everything that will fit in the vise, you will love the accurate cuts. You do have to change blades for different materials so you need a good supply of blades of different pitches.
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
..the main function of coolant is to wash the cut and blade clean of swarf...........if you cant stand sticky coolant,maybe try some sodium carbonate solution......enough soda to stop rust ,and thats it..........certainly no deposit when it dries.
 

gustafson

Diamond
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Location
People's Republic
I use my manual slow speed cold saw very rarely. I have a spray bottle of my regular water based coolant hanging on the frame. Blade is more than a decade old.
So, yes you need coolant, but no you don't need floor coolant per se
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
I have never done this but just thinking. With having a small air shot to blow away chips into a catch box , and then having an oil-charged rag wheel to wet the saw might be a solution to less oil splashing.

QT: John K [enough soda to stop rust, and that's it] another thin good about soda water is that it is not a chemical that needs fancy disposal.
 

jbacc

Cast Iron
Joined
May 5, 2009
Location
New Jersey
I use my manual slow speed cold saw very rarely. I have a spray bottle of my regular water based coolant hanging on the frame. Blade is more than a decade old.
So, yes you need coolant, but no you don't need floor coolant per se

^^^^^^^^^^^^Exactly what I do!
 

Gumbydammit

Plastic
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
I have the exact same saw, and I use cooltool. It has been through two winters in an unheated space and no rust so far. The only issue I had, was I had to ad food grade antifreeze to the tank. So my two cents is to use coolant. I had to cut a couple of pieces dry... (coolant frozen) and the blade did NOT like it.

Cheers,
Gumby
 

M. Moore

Titanium
Joined
Jun 8, 2007
Location
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
The flood coolant, as the name suggests, keeps the blade cool as it is cutting. This is the main purpose, the second is to lubricate the cut, then clear swarf and chips. The heat generated is surprising.
I cut 3/4” x 4 hot rolled everyday ( among other sizes) and my blades last for months between sharpenings. If I did not use coolant it would probably be days.
You can definitely cut dry but the blades will not stay sharp for very long.
 

boslab

Titanium
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Location
wales.uk
You can get solid wax stick blade lube from memory, it’s aluminium version is very attractive to rats I found ( I had a box of sticks under a bench in a lock up near a canal, the rats ate the sticks, and the bloody box and cleaned thier fangs on the box staples) it’s tallow!
Mark
 

projectnut

Stainless
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Location
Wisconsin
You can get solid wax stick blade lube from memory, it’s aluminium version is very attractive to rats I found ( I had a box of sticks under a bench in a lock up near a canal, the rats ate the sticks, and the bloody box and cleaned thier fangs on the box staples) it’s tallow!
Mark

Here's the stuff I'm referring to:
https://agscompany.com/product/cut-ease-cutting-lubricant-stick-1-lb/

I have several sticks I bought to use on the bandsaw and power hacksaw. I use it most often when cutting large rounds of aluminum. The blade brush wasn't cleaning out the blade gullets very well so I tried rubbing a little on the blade just before the cut. It helps keep the swarf from packing into the gullets so the brush can clean them relatively well. I find it interesting that the manufacturer has no stock, but several retailers are selling it for up to $25.00 a tube.
 

MwTech Inc

Titanium
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Location
Fishersville VA
You may find yourself using the cold saw more than you think, once you see the quality of cut......

We sold the bandsaw after it sat for months not being used.

We processed 40 ft of 4x4x.187 square tube yesterday , all cuts were angled, dead straight and clean.

We added a parts washer brush to the coolant system to "wash" down after use. Saw stays clean.

Still have to maintain the sump, but no big deal.

Occasional spray with LPS #3

Never runs without coolant.
 

MwTech Inc

Titanium
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Location
Fishersville VA
I looked up your saw.......If it were mine I'd make a pan to expand the table size for coolant collection.
Our KMT has a larger "base" and we still have add on baffles to control coolant.
 

medsar

Cast Iron
Joined
Jan 13, 2017
Location
Washington, USA
I find my cold saw will walk inside of the cut. That is for miters and for straight cuts. The blade and vise are true/perpendicular. I played with feed pressure and found it to be finicky. A few cuts were fine but I had to use a lot lighter pressure than the experts said I should be using. Even then, it didn’t always give a straight cut. This was in square tubing because that it was what the jobs called for at the time. Maybe it’s better with round tubing?
What am I doing wrong? Has anyone else noticed this?


If the OP is angry I derailed the thread, let me know and I’ll start a new thread. I figured the original question has been answered appropriately at this point.
 

Bondo

Hot Rolled
Joined
May 14, 2011
Location
Bridgeton NJ
You could try using that "cold air spray" vortex tube that chills the compressed sir as it comes out. That will help with chip removal as well.
 








 
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