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can I rent a rollback truck?

Putch

Hot Rolled
Joined
Nov 15, 2011
Location
Butler, PA
I'm getting kinda tired of waiting on my buddy for his help moving a B-port, don't have the means to move it myself, but I am looking to buy a 1-ton pickup and trailer with winch in the near future. Anyway, until then does anyone know of a place or company I can rent a rollback truck from?

Thanks,
Putch
 
Check your yellow pages (or Google) and look for wrecker dealers. They might have a trade in that they could rent you. I think it's gonna be difficult to track a rental down, though.
 
Just standard vertical mill? Rent a penske or ryder with liftgate along with a pallet jack....put mill on pallet....set mill on liftgate....raise up...pull in with pallet jack and strap it down .....depending on mileage should be under 100 bucks
 
Putsch,

Perhaps I don't understand your situation...

But I've moved a couple of machine tools by showing up with the seller's in my van or pickup with a medium duty trailer simultaneously with the arrival of a big rig wrecker I had hired. I've always hired the ones with a telescoping boom. I'd carefully rig it myself and he'd make the lift and lower it onto my trailer. In your case you're talking about a mill.

I moved a Bridgeport about 600 miles in similar fashion although the seller loaded my trailer with a forklift. With a Bridgeport you can lower the knee all the way down so that it rests its weight on a block of wood rather than on the threads of the knee screw. Then rotate the head all the way upside down, tighten all the ram and other table clamp screws, rig a pad-eye to the center of the ram and you're good to go. That is an approved lift method according to the Bridgeport manual. I confess however, that I've never lifted a Bridgeport using a boom wrecker so I don't know for a fact you can get enough lift. A U-Haul trailer is good enough if you take care to stabilize the tipping point of the mill with some timbers cross bolted underneath the foot.

V
 
Most Roll-Backs have a by the hour rate or vehicle/distance rate with driver.
I have hired them to move forklifts, Bobcat Trencher and even a 20' shipping container.
I doubt there is any place to rent the truck because of the liability and if they did the cost would be extreme!
 
Its gonna be cheaper to hire a tow truck with driver than to rent a bare truck.
Around here, anyway, any bigger truck is a minimum of $100 a day, usually closer to $200, plus mileage- often fifty cents a mile. Plus insurance, of course, and in almost every case, your standard auto insurance wont cover it.

Means its $200 to $350 for me to hire a 20 foot flatbed and drive it to Seattle and back.

Never seen anyone that rents out flatbed towtrucks- I cant imagine there is enough market to justify all the time its not rented, but you are paying payments and insurance on one.
 
Some Sunbelt Rental places rent hydraulic trailers where the deck lowers to ground level for loading. If you can get it to pallet jack height, with stout stringers for increased footprint width, it can be a smooth and drama-free move. (I prefer the low potential energy altitude in leiu of roll-backs.)

Chip
 
Well, goofy double post, but I'll edit it.
A boom towtruck can carry a Bridgeport down the road for two miles, easy, and legal.
Do a google search on this site for some details/pics to show your drive.
site:www.practicalmachinist.com bridgeport towtruck
or something like that.

Hell, for two miles, you could get two tree stumps and spider it down the road with the knee lift and the handwheels on the table acme screws. :)

Chip
 
Kinda didn't want some grease monkey dropping my machines so this is why I need to rent and finally just get my own truck. It only needs to go 2 miles, that's the sad part! I was thinking about driving the damn thing home on a forklift!

It's up on two 2 x 4's on end with 5/8" bolts down through the 4 holes in the base now, just sitting there sorrowfully with schedule 40 pipe cut to length and waiting to roll on in the garage, just needs to get there!

I did put an eye-bolt in the ram and lifted it a little with an engine hoist but it wants to tip forward and I don't like that at all. It has been sitting on the same 2 x 4's (real 2 x 4 not 1 1/2 x 3 1/2") with beveled ends to ease onto the pipes for a month or two now. Knee weight is on a 2 x 4. Head is tilted sideways and the other end of the ram has the shaping attachment. Table is back close to the column, locked. Table is about 1/3 of travel to the right (head and table weight = heavy side toward the front of the truck when loaded with forklift and the weight being there should help in offloading).
 

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Quote by Putch
"I did put an eye-bolt in the ram and lifted it a little with an engine hoist but it wants to tip forward and I don't like that at all. "

In my experience (limited to moving two different vertical mills - a B/Port and a Gorton) if you rotate the head 180 degrees, lower the knee all the way, move the table back toward the column, and fiddle with the ram overhang, you should be able to trim it until it hangs straight and true. Assuming you're rigged with a good, properly rated swivel eye threaded into the center of the ram with a good grade of bolt, and slung from good tackle, and provided you lag the base to something, it should all be drama free.

When I moved the Bridgeport from Arkansas to Texas I built a pallet from channel iron and flat bar strips. I centered this between the axles and then threaded two 8' 4x4s cross-ways through the pallet from side to side on the trailer. The forklift lowered the mill onto the pallet so that the 5/8" holes in the foot were over the 4x4s and sat her down. I lagged the mill to the 4x4s, strapped it with "springer" lines (in an X like ships use) and headed for Texas. There was never a hint of the feeling that the load might get away from me.

V
 
It only needs to go 2 miles, that's the sad part! I was thinking about driving the damn thing home on a forklift!

Drive your forklift over there and load it on a truck. Drive the forklift home and unload it.
 
Well, goofy double post, but I'll edit it.
A boom towtruck can carry a Bridgeport down the road for two miles, easy, and legal.
Do a google search on this site for some details/pics to show your drive.
site:www.practicalmachinist.com bridgeport towtruck
or something like that.

Hell, for two miles, you could get two tree stumps and spider it down the road with the knee lift and the handwheels on the table acme screws. :)

Chip

Chip - weird things going on with this post now but anyway - found a Sunbelt place not too far away with these trailers, but I don't see a winch or any hydraulic decks. Maybe I'll just skid it off with a pry bar
 
In my experience (limited to moving two different vertical mills - a B/Port and a Gorton) if you rotate the head 180 degrees, lower the knee all the way, and move the table back toward the column, it should hang straight and true.[/QUOTE]

I would do that but I have the shaping attachment on the back of the ram and figured that's gotta be pretty heavy, don't wanna make 2 trips out of it really. Plus I'm forklifting it off and rolling it in so there's no need to lift from the top anyway.
 
Quote by Putch
"I did put an eye-bolt in the ram and lifted it a little with an engine hoist but it wants to tip forward and I don't like that at all. "

In my experience (limited to moving two different vertical mills - a B/Port and a Gorton) if you rotate the head 180 degrees, lower the knee all the way, move the table back toward the column, and fiddle with the ram overhang, you should be able to trim it until it hangs straight and true. Assuming you're rigged with a good, properly rated swivel eye threaded into the center of the ram with a good grade of bolt, and slung from good tackle, and provided you lag the base to something, it should all be drama free.

When I moved the Bridgeport from Arkansas to Texas I built a pallet from channel iron and flat bar strips. I centered this between the axles and then threaded two 8' 4x4s cross-ways through the pallet from side to side on the trailer. The forklift lowered the mill onto the pallet so that the 5/8" holes in the foot were over the 4x4s and sat her down. I lagged the mill to the 4x4s, strapped it with "springer" lines (in an X like ships use) and headed for Texas. There was never a hint of the feeling that the load might get away from me.

V

I would do that but I have the shaping attachment on the back of the ram and figured that's gotta be pretty heavy, don't wanna take it off just to balance it for top lifting and come back for the shaping attachment and make 2 trips out of it really. Plus I'm forklifting it off and rolling it in so there's no need to lift from the top anyway.
 
In my experience (limited to moving two different vertical mills - a B/Port and a Gorton) if you rotate the head 180 degrees, lower the knee all the way, move the table back toward the column, and fiddle with the ram overhang, you should be able to trim it until it hangs straight and true. Assuming you're rigged with a good, properly rated swivel eye threaded into the center of the ram with a good grade of bolt, and slung from good tackle, and provided you lag the base to something, it should all be drama free.

V
Absolutely. Move the big pieces as needed to put the lift eye over the centroid.
 
In my experience (limited to moving two different vertical mills - a B/Port and a Gorton) if you rotate the head 180 degrees, lower the knee all the way, move the table back toward the column, and fiddle with the ram overhang, you should be able to trim it until it hangs straight and true. Assuming you're rigged with a good, properly rated swivel eye threaded into the center of the ram with a good grade of bolt, and slung from good tackle, and provided you lag the base to something, it should all be drama free.

V
Absolutely. Move the big pieces as needed to put the lift eye over the centroid.
 
Putch,

If you get a tommy gate or any lift gate truck:

Move the gate down lever with as slow a start as you can. Often people swing the lever too fast and almost loose the machine with coming down fast and afraid to stop it mid drop.

*Inch the lever to down position tiny bit, tiny bit until it begins to move then let it down as slow as it will go.

Load machine heavy side to the truck to have less chance of wanting to tip off at start or end of down travel.

*Load on and off with forklift is much safer than a lift gate.

I always tell the driver to drive like he has a cup of hot coffee sitting on the dash.

Buck
 
The tow truck driver I call would charge me $75 for that move, he has moved 20 machines for me and never damaged anything, call the wrecker guy and be done with it
 








 
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