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Can you identify this lathe? Need help please.

Dean W

Plastic
Joined
Oct 22, 2021
I am looking at purchasing a larger lathe. I ran across this one, but the seller has no info. Can't even tell me the maker. I have looked at photos, but have been unable to identify it. Can someone tell me the maker at least? It has a unique looking tailstock. Thanks for your help.
 

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James H Clark

Stainless
Joined
May 11, 2011
Location
southern in.
Dean: Not trying to be snarky, but it doesn't really matter what make it is. It is well over 100 years old and no parts would be available for it. The only halfway modern feature to it is the quick change feeds. I don't know what kind of work you are planning on doing on it, but this is a pretty crude machine to try to do work on. Good luck and keep looking.
JH
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
Clean up the bronze tag on the QC gearbox and see if it has a name

Fair chance it might be a very early Le Blond - but who knows. R. K. LeBlond liked making his tail stocks with that sort of obvious taper in the cast iron

A bigger LeBlond (24") maybe around the same period but WITHOUT QC gear box - good of early apron

lathe 1.jpglathe3.jpglathe4.jpglathe5.jpg

Another bronze tag - with name - just to left of chuck on head stock upright

lathe2.jpg
 
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john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
The QC handle setup is Le Blond...ish.......Agreed ,buy a lathe made sometime since the 19th century.....preferably the 1950s to 1970s...........A lathe like that will sell for a few dollars to someone wanting to set up a display to drive with an old engine at rallys,to demonstrate belt drive...not to use as you want.
 

cbx1xl5

Plastic
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Any old lathe can be recommissioned. Usually they are taken out of service because of the over head line shafting and health and safety issues in workshops. People tend to forget, that the parts that were turned on these machines are still about today on old cars, motorcycles, and farm machinery. So I'd say go for it.

Sent from my G3311 using Tapatalk
 








 
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