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Canedy-Otto screw press

Greg Menke

Diamond
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Location
Baltimore, MD, USA
Some years ago I had the opportunity to use one of the big A frame screw presses at Tuckahoe (IIRC at least a 10ton model), fell in love with the action and finesse the machine afforded. Meanwhile I had one of the usual "12 ton" Northern tool hydraulic units (complete with warped table)- it works OK but I've never much liked it.

An opportunity came up to get a smaller press via this thread (Keystone Marine Motor Works (Essington, PA)) so I jumped at the opportunity, and eventually got it into the garage;


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total weight is probably on the order of 600 lbs, an easy carry in a pickup;

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but the center-of-gravity is challenging if you can't pick it from high up on the frame. A shop crane is problematic, would be good to drop the table to the bottom and put shackles thru the pin holes as high up as possible. I picked using the table which made the lift really sketchy.

The screw head adds a lot of weight up high but its fairly heavy so not easily removed unless you have a suitable rafter or similar. The head is retained by the obvious pair of bolts, and is tightly fit between the frame's upper members (when reassembling, jack the upper frame apart slightly.

Inside the head I found a set of loose balls forming a thrust bearing to support the free motion of the ram. The smooth upper face is the thrust bearing which applies pressure to a workpiece.

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be sure to disassemble with a tray or cement mixing basin underneath, the balls go everywhere as soon as the head separates! The compounding lever system acts very cleanly up or down but is somewhat in the way when rotating the wheel by hand, perhaps something to get used to through use. I've not put floor anchors in for the other machines, I think I will need them for this machine once theres a length of pipe going into the compound lever knuckles...

The head is lubricated using a grease cup with screw-on cap to force lubricant into the screw and bearings, much like some old motors. The head was filled with mostly solidified circa 1920 grease.With oil as assembly lube the screw zips up and down very nicely. After reassembly I used #1 grease which worked well.

The arbor press tool is simple rack and pinion but it does have a lever and pawl, and a holding spring against the arbor rack teeth. I'm looking forward to broaching keyways on this, my cheapie hydraulic press worked but does not give a good feel for the cut.

A small assortment of possibly-OEM tooling came with the press; v-blocks, nice piece of plate to go on the table and some related bits which may end up being handy for the arbor press end of the machine. The machine does have an OEM v-head for the working end of the screw, its quite rough and will need some refinishing, but the set looks to be very handy for shaft straightening and similar.
 
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Greg Menke

Diamond
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Location
Baltimore, MD, USA
I don't- but the canedy-otto plate is bolted to the frame, seems like it'd be easy to rebadge. The compounding collar on this press is babbitted, if thats of any help.

Inside the head, whomever was doing the drilling and tapping that day messed up, 2 sets of holes tapped but the head only goes together using one of them. I guess the Bull said "Rotate it a smidge and put a new set in the right positions, and don't tell QA". :D
 

Greg Menke

Diamond
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Location
Baltimore, MD, USA
and for the record, when making a handle to go in the arbor press pawl knuckle, make sure to set the length so it can swing down past the table with enough clearance so your fingers don't get smashed... :D
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
Inside the head, whomever was doing the drilling and tapping that day messed up, 2 sets of holes tapped but the head only goes together using one of them. I guess the Bull said "Rotate it a smidge and put a new set in the right positions, and don't tell QA". :D

They could be "Jack out" holes.
 

Greg Menke

Diamond
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Location
Baltimore, MD, USA
They could be "Jack out" holes.

Ah no such luck- these are a set of 4 blind tapped holes taking the screws thru a ring that retains handwheel/thrust bearing together in the head. I had a good time clamping everything together to keep the balls in place so I could flip the head and look down thru the holes to find the set that would take all 4 screws.

a mis-drilled set would risk scrapping out the top half casting.
 








 
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