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CH Besly NO 6 double disc grinder

Nickraatz

Plastic
Joined
May 11, 2021
Hi,

We have what appears to be a Besly No 6 double disc grinder and I am looking for some information on it. We have had it for a long time but we only use it for one part therefor it does not get used often. I was checking it out the other day and it sparked my curiosity. Does anyone have any idea what year this machine might be from? Also, what are the counter weights for that I have pictured in DD grinder 8? What are the two adjustment knobs pictured in DD grinder 2,3, and 6. Does anyone have an information about the oilers? What oil should be used and how often should you flip the spring loaded oiler thing to let oil into the spindle?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Nick
 

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If you have a machine in your shop that you actually use. It seems like it's up to you to know-your-machine? Not knowing what oil or how to use the oiler does not bode well for the condition of the machine or your shops capabilities. Locate an operators manual and read it.
Thanks for your suggestion. I have only been here for about a year, and most of the information at this company is tribal knowledge that has been lost. I asked the two guys who have been here the longest, 15 and 18 years and neither of them had an answer for me. No one even knows when we acquired this machine and from what little information I was able to find online I think this grinder is somewhere between 1930-1950 therefor we are not the original owners nor was there a manual that came with it which is why I reached out on here. This machine only gets run for about 8 hours every 6 months.
 
No experience with this machine, but looking at the photo's, it looks like the weights are to make the grinder heads move side to side with more ease. If no manual turns up, I'd look at manuals for old centerless grinders for what kind of oil to use as I imagine they'd be used in the same abrasive environment, etc.

A machine that old is likely meant to be oiled daily if the oil points are little cups or holes. If there are any revivors, they probably need to be checked and topped off daily or weekly. Before sealed bearings became common, most anything that didn't have a sealed enclosure around it was meant to be a total loss oil system. In other words, your lubricant is also an active means of cleaning the machine as it washes out contaminants that would otherwise egress in between shafts and bearings. A common problem on 'ol iron' machines is using grease on anything but the simplest of parts (think door hinge), as it traps debris and doesn't stay between moving parts, unless it's under constant pressure to replenish itself. Oil uses gravity and physics to keep flowing. That's why so many old machines had trays and gutters built around them, partly for cutting lubricants and dust/chip control, but also to control the drips of oil weeping out around shafts and gears.
 
This company seems to be offering service on these machines .
Perhaps they can be of some help if you haven't tried there already.
I remember receiving catalogues showing some of their other used grinders from them years ago but never bought anything from them .
Jim
 
I have seen folks get very touchy on the subject of what type of oil to use so hopefully I don't get too much hate for the following statement: The wrong kind of oil is better than none at all.

The condition that machine is in, I would say that statement applies.

If you are hell bent on beginning a maintenance schedule for the machine, you may have to figure stuff out on your own, if you can't find the machine manual and manufacturer recommendations.

MB Naegle had a good point to use oils recommended for similar equipment.

If you want to get close to what the manufacturer probably would have recommended, see if you can figure what the oilers are actually lubricating/where the pipes go. From my experience, generally lighter weight oils to high speed spindles, medium weight oils to ways and slides, heavy weight oils to gears. (Again to avoid getting myself flamed, this varies between machines and is just a general rule of thumb that I use. Haven't had anything blow up on me yet, so it must work)

Those type of oiler cups, you flip up and leave up while the machine is in use. There is a needle valve in there attached to a screw that allows for adjustment of the flow of oil. On other machines I have run with this type of oiler, the manufacturer typically will recommend that it uses the full cup in a shift. Again, this varies and is different between machines, manufacturer, and the type of component to be oiled. If you want to be stingy, adjust so it only uses half the cup in a shift.

It is likely if nobody else in the shop knows a thing about the machine, it has probably not been properly maintained, and any damage has already been done. But good to get in the habit to prevent further damage, I suppose? Although I have seen machines start to get cranky when you start oiling them after a long dry period. Fickle things, these old machines are - they have personalities all their own.
 
What oil to use? Motor bearings may use a different weight than other moving parts. Motor nameplate might specify type and weight.
Liked on VintageMachinery for info. Nothing tat references the #6 machine except a price list from the 40's.
 
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Petersen Precision here in Redwood City used to do DD grinding for me when I worked at SRI. You might call them up and ask to speak to the person in their shop who runs their machines and pick their brain. That would work if you took the right, friendly approach.
 
We had Besly double disk grinders at GM and I worked on them. your machine is from the 1930's if not older. The one handle is a stop for adjusting the disc travel and the other one is to tilt the one disk. Your machine looks like it was built to be able to hand load a part, feed in the one grinding wheel to grind then back off the one wheel head and unload. All the ones we had at GM where through feed machines.
 
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We had Besly double disk grinders at GM and I worked on them. your machine is from the 1930's if not older. The one handle is a stop for adjusting the disc travel and the other one is to tilt the one disk. Your machine looks like it was built to be able to hand load a part, feed in the one grinding wheel to grind then back off the one wheel head and unload. All the ones we had at GM where through feed machines.
You are talking about the two T-handles on the side correct? If so, what do you mean for adjusting the disc travel? There are three nuts that you loosen and then you turn a rack and pinion on each side that brings the whole motor and spindle assembly closer or further away. That being said, I had everything set up the other day with our new fixture and there was able 1/16" of clearance and after testing a few parts the one spindle did move in by itself and started hitting the fixture even though the rack and pinion was tight. Are the T-handles for a fine adjustment and maybe one was loose which allowed the head to walk in?
 








 
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