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CHIPMASTER belt-drive conversion

Hi Paul.

First of all, you need the only ONE correct oil for the variator - no substitutes or blah blah.
Next, you need to adjust the tension between input and output cones.
Both are crucial to the survival of the variator - but really easy to do...

The variator needs a fixed input speed - close to 1500 RPM.
A VFD is not to be used or even neccessary. Unless you need it for phase or voltage conversion...

Good luck,
Erik
 
Hi Paul.

First of all, you need the only ONE correct oil for the variator - no substitutes or blah blah.
Next, you need to adjust the tension between input and output cones.
Both are crucial to the survival of the variator - but really easy to do...

The variator needs a fixed input speed - close to 1500 RPM.
A VFD is not to be used or even neccessary. Unless you need it for phase or voltage conversion...

Good luck,
Erik
Thank you, Eric - thus far, I've found one person on ebay selling the magic oil, one litre containers. I'll adjust the variator - does this require removal?

And yes, I'll need something for phase conversion, leaning towards a VFD.

Paul
 
Hi Paul.

First of all, you need the only ONE correct oil for the variator - no substitutes or blah blah.
Next, you need to adjust the tension between input and output cones.
Both are crucial to the survival of the variator - but really easy to do...

The variator needs a fixed input speed - close to 1500 RPM.
A VFD is not to be used or even neccessary. Unless you need it for phase or voltage conversion...

Good luck,
Erik
FYI I've never touched the cone tension adjustment on mine. It seems like you can do small adjustments from the accessible outboard end of the unit. If you have to access the inboard adjuster to even up the adjustments on each end, my advice would be to remove the door and cubby from the lathe's base instead of pulling the variator. I removed the cubby to replace the drive belt from the motor to the variator on mine. It was not much fun due to cramped quarters.
 
I wonder whats magic with the oil............Id reckon one of the ATF specs would be right for it...........the catch there is industrial ATF s are only sold in large quantities .......20 litre drums if you are lucky,if not then 200litre .
 
Hi Paul and John.
I guess there must be a very good reason why Allspeeds variators require that oil.
After all, they don't sell it themselves and therefore make no profit off it.
 
I'm giving the lathe a badly needed cleaning and I need to fix an obvious leak from the Matrix clutch. Other than draining and refilling oil, is there any need to get into the gearbox, headstock, or apron?
 
On mine the headstock "second shaft" bushings and journals were worn. The bushings are cast iron and accessible as diamond-shaped flanges held from the exterior by a pair of screws. See p. 26 in this PDF manual. I had the shaft journals ground and made new bushings to fit. I suggest you take the big cover off the rear of the headstock, take a look inside, and clean and flush.
 
Regarding leaks, I also noticed oil inside the electrics box on the back. The entire box was clean, except for oil along the inside bottom back edge.
 
I'm breaking down the lathe to clean out a few decades worth of dirt and chips - any hints on removing the carriage/apron?

And from what I've heard, removing the headstock is ill advised?
 
You will have to realign it ,but apart from that its no big deal if you have already taken out the drive belt ........When I get lathes in pieces ,the headstock is generally removed and separate.............the saddle is the MkI Bantam/Mk I&1/2 Student type ,and there is a vid online about removing it .........even if you dont remove it ,try to remove the "shoe" and clean out all the rust ,swarf ,and crud.
 
There should be no issue removing the headstock. On these lathes it's just a flat face to face bolted joint with a single dowel in one corner. The headstock can be pivoted around the dowel to adjust the spindle axis yaw. Just make sure the mating faces of the headstock and bed are deburred / de-dinged, scrupulously cleaned, and lightly oiled when you reassemble.
 
You will have to realign it ,but apart from that its no big deal if you have already taken out the drive belt ........When I get lathes in pieces ,the headstock is generally removed and separate.............the saddle is the MkI Bantam/Mk I&1/2 Student type ,and there is a vid online about removing it .........even if you dont remove it ,try to remove the "shoe" and clean out all the rust ,swarf ,and crud.
Can't find that video, but I'm assuming it's something like remove the leadscrew/feed shaft bracket at the tailstock end, remove the leadscrew and feed shaft and crank the carriage/apron off the end? The unknown is removal of the leadscrew and feed shaft at the gearbox end.
 
The leadscrew simply pulls out in a Bantam ........however ,the shoe doesnt drop out ,as the bushes either side retain it in the apron ........Ive forgotten the differences between Chippie and Bantam.....you d have to check the parts book.
 
They're threaded 10-32 internally and pressed into the casting - threading in a screw and pulling had them out easily. After sliding the lead screw bracket off, both the lead screw and feed rod pulled right out, there's nothing holding them in the gear box. After that, I removed the apron, then the saddle. I'm glad I took it apart - it's quite a mess.
 

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Is there any way to be sure my spindle bearings are getting properly lubricated? I know there's an access plate on the back of the headstock, but if I remove the access plate, won't I lose all the headstock oil?
 
Is there any way to be sure my spindle bearings are getting properly lubricated? I know there's an access plate on the back of the headstock, but if I remove the access plate, won't I lose all the headstock oil?
The bearings are lubricated by oil carried up to two troughs in the top of the headstock that then drain into the spindle bearings. It's basically a splash system. If you see oil in the sight glass and it is disturbed while the spindle is turning even by hand, your lube system is probably fine. However, if you have not drained the oil and taken off the headstock rear cover, I still recommend you do that to make sure the lube troughs are clear and you can suck the sludge out of the bottom of the headstock.
 
The bearings are lubricated by oil carried up to two troughs in the top of the headstock that then drain into the spindle bearings. It's basically a splash system. If you see oil in the sight glass and it is disturbed while the spindle is turning even by hand, your lube system is probably fine. However, if you have not drained the oil and taken off the headstock rear cover, I still recommend you do that to make sure the lube troughs are clear and you can suck the sludge out of the bottom of the headstock.
Will do - someone installed a drain valve where the headstock drain plug resided.

When flushing, use the same oil, or something like mineral spirits/kerosene, then follow up with a flush of the same oil?
 








 
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