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Cincinatti 2L Horizontal Mill - "Dad's Mill"

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
I took apart and cleaned the indexers chuck last night. Lots of dry oil and fine chips, but overall in good shape except for some scars from drill bits getting too close. The jaws look really good. It's an old Whitton chuck with integrated threaded back. The front is made up of three "pie" slices held on with a bunch of Allen screws. There are no dowel pins in it though, just a shoulder to locate it diameter-wise and nothing but the screws to clock the pieces, so after reassembly one jaw had a bit of play and the others were tight. I'll need to take it back apart and reassemble with some gage blocks to set the gaps.

After removing the B&S #10 center from the back of the indexer, I realized it didn't have an adapter sleeve, but rather a straight shank neck-down portion with a dimple drilled into one side, so rather than using a plate threaded to the spindle to drive your between centers work such as on a lathe, you would have a driving fork fixed to the center. Similar I guess to grinding between centers.
 

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
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Here's a couple shots of the Indexer tailstock, post cleaning and paint.
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This shows the missing center height adjustment pinion, which had a second binding bolt in it's place. The black knob on the mills table is one we had in out supply that should work well for this job. The pin protruding from the binding bolt is supposed to fit into a notch to keep the bolt from turning, but I think this part was fabricated by someone in the past and they put the pin in the wrong spot so it can't press in as far as it's supposed to, so I'll drill a new hole for it and finish it right.
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This is the current center piece. You can see where they over-cut the dovetail and welded and ground the backside so that it would clamp in place. They made it to work with some kind of small tapered center, but I think when I re-do it I'll likely make the center one piece with the dovetail like it was. while making one, I'll make a few so I have some spares for the next time the cutter gets too close. Not sure if it would be better to keep them soft and sacrificial so the cutter survives in that instance, or make them out of tool steel and kill the cutter (and likely the center too....). Until I find that round-to-it to make them, this one looks like it'll work for the time being.
 

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
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All my bearings have arrived. Now just need a couple evenings to swap them out and see if that fixes my "crunch" issue.
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This is the vise I was last using on this mill, an old L.W. Chuck Co. Works well enough but has the typical moving jaw lift issue requiring a hearty mallet strike with each clamp. I'll likely put this vise aside to use on an older mill that may find me in the future. In it's place I'll use these:
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The bottom vise is what Mr. Spaulding used on this mill years ago and the one above it is a double I found on eBay a few years ago. These are "Hilo" vises, made by Saunders in England. Can't find hardly anything about them online, but they're one of the best "classic" vise designs I've ever seen/used. For one, they have a nice geometric shape and low-slung design, and the sliding jaw rides on a dovetail so you can adjust out nearly any play or jaw lift (I have a soft spot for dovetail vises). The real "patented" feature of these vises though is in the screw. I've never taken one apart (never needed to) and am not sure exactly how they work, but they have a compound function that moves the jaw in a "hi" speed when it's loose, and then a "lo" speed when it meets resistance, doubling down clamping pressure, hence the "Hilo" name. The only downside is that these use their own proprietary jaw, unlike the standard Kurt vises everywhere else in the shop, but I can make jaws. One evening I'll take these apart to clean and paint them, and I want to compare them on the granite table and if needed grind the back(s) so that they will stay as a matched pair for holding onto long work. Mainly just need to verify that the bottoms are even and complainer, and the slot keys are close enough that they can be dialed in to match each other.

I've got one other vise like these (also came from Spaulding's collection), that is a different design, but also has a dovetail slide and some kind of double-down feature. I THINK although I can't confirm it, that that one is a very very old Hilma that has some kind of hydraulic screw. It has some similar design features, but haven't seen any other milling vise just like it. I use that one on my little Bridgeport round ram at home.
 
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