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Cincinnati-Bickford 9-3 Electrical Diagram RAD.

gregfortin

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Does anyone have an Electrical Diagram for a Cincinnati-Bickford 9-3 Radial arm drill? Thank you.
 
I might have one.I recently bought a used machinery dealers collection of machine tool manuals. About 15 full filing cabinets worth of manuals and sales brochures. I will not be able to take a look to see if I have what you’re looking for at least a week or two due to my job schedule.

Just out of curiosity what is the issue that you’re having that you need the electrical schematic?
 
It doesn’t have the correct wiring for the forward /reverse lever. I need to rewire this. Thanks.
 

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I don't know if this will help, but here's the drawing out of my CB radial drill. I know it's hard to read, sorry about that. It is all I have though. MikeView attachment 433721
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I don’t see the forward reverse switch on your schematic. But my first question is how are you powering the DP? Is your three phase from the power company, a rotary phase converter, a VFD, or a static phase converter? The first three will allow you to reverse the motor rotation. To the best of my knowledge a static phase convertor will not. I freely admit that I do not have any experience with static phase convertors or, for that matter, rotary convertors and VFDs. I only started buying three phase machinery after I had a shop with three phase from the electric company. So if anyone knows differently about static convertors I’ll happily stand corrected.
 
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What I can tell you on mine I don't reverse the motor. It has a clutch lever to forward and reverse. It's 220 3 phase and I have 3 phase power here.
 
It doesn’t have the correct wiring for the forward /reverse lever. I need to rewire this. Thanks.
There's not really very much going on here:
img_5175-jpeg.433636

You have two 3-phase motor starters (one for forward, one for reverse), with some sort of interlock to keep them both from operating at the same time. An industrial electrician doesn't need a wiring diagram to understand what's going on here.

Can't tell for sure, but some of the wires look like they got pretty warm and someone has obviously been in there messing around recently. One thing that catches my eye is that the coils for the starters have tags that say 110 Volts AC. You don't have 110 VAC available, so if some idiot tried to wire the starters up to 240, they may well have fried the coils.

First thing to do is to trace all of the wires and draw up a sketch of how it's currently connected. Pay careful attention to the wiring repairs.
 
Finally found success. There is 440/220-115 transformer hanging on the side. I pulled the cover and checked the output with my voltmeter. Found the transformer to be bad. Also found the main motor to be wired 440. I reconfigured the motor to 220. I have a Phase Perfect 10 HP converter which puts out 220. I found the two outgoing wires from the transformer going to the drill press and connected one to the T1 leg and the other to common( this provided 110 volts to the starter coils). After that it was pretty basic to see how the start lever switches worked.
It’s works perfect now. Thanks to everyone who helped.
 
First hole! Sounds like a sewing machine.
 

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The drill is sitting on leveling pads. Is there any danger of this thing tipping over when the arm is 90’ to the base?
 
The drill is sitting on leveling pads. Is there any danger of this thing tipping over when the arm is 90’ to the base?
The table you are using is actually supposed to go on the side, 90 degrees to the work surface it is sitting on. In the last photos it would be "behind" the drill press. In the picture of it sitting outside, you can see the 4 mounting screw holes in front of the column.
 
Finally found success. There is 440/220-115 transformer hanging on the side. I pulled the cover and checked the output with my voltmeter. Found the transformer to be bad. Also found the main motor to be wired 440. I reconfigured the motor to 220. I have a Phase Perfect 10 HP converter which puts out 220. I found the two outgoing wires from the transformer going to the drill press and connected one to the T1 leg and the other to common( this provided 110 volts to the starter coils). ....
You don't have a "common" or neutral wire coming into the machine:
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You have three incoming "hot" wires, which I assume come from the RPC and some ground wires that aren't connected. It's dangerous to use the ground wires for "common", so I hope that's not what you wound up doing. It should be easy to wire the 440/220-115 control transformer to provide 110 for the motor control circuit. You want to use the two real phases from the RPC to power the control circuit, since the artificial phase can to strange things at startup and cause strange behaviors.

Also, it's bad practice and a violation of code in most areas to use a white (or green) wire as a "hot" wire (it's a safety thing). If you're going to use that cable to power the machine, you should tape the ends of the white wire black so that the next guy can see at a glance what's going on.
 








 
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