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Clark C500Y150 w/ Continental F245 dies under load at idle

jhov

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 5, 2020
My Clark lift dies when under load at idle. I need to drive it with two feet to keep the RPMs up when turning the wheel or lifting the forks or it dies. I thought it might just be a governor issue, but reviewing the F series overhaul manual it appears to have a gear driven governor that only limits max RPM. I haven't found any other references to indicate how the system works or how it maintains idle RPM under a load. Does anyone have any experience with the lift or engine that might provide some tips or references? Thanks.
 

jhov

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 5, 2020
Supposedly it was serviced by a professional company just before I bought it. It looks the part and runs well otherwise.
 

jhov

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 5, 2020
Idle speed too low, idle mixture too lean, ignition too advanced, not a diesel like it should be.

Initially I was glad it was a gas engine because all my engines are gas so I don't store any diesel. Then I bought a diesel truck with 300 gallon tanks and now I wish everything was diesel powered. Live and learn..
 
Sounds like too much pressure and or too heavy a viscosity hydraulic oil. The hydraulic pump can stall the engine when it is deadheaded or the bypass is set too high.

Is the lift have a steering pump and a lift pump? Also check for restrictions in the return/bypass circuit. Would raising the idle 100 rpm solve the problem? Is this gas or propane fueled?

Steve
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
With Continentals ,the distributor is often /usually badly worn,and I found point gap (and timing) changed with revs.......the only cure is a new dizzy,which will be electronic.
 

Tony Quiring

Titanium
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Location
Madera county california usa
What is idle rpm?

While at idle and out of gear do 2 things .

Very slowly open throttle and listen carefully for any odd sounds and just pay attention.

Then do more rapid opening.

Often a clogged passage in low sped circuits gets clogged and slow increase in throttle causes air flow through this area causing poor operation as it passes.

Old timer trick...

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

matt_isserstedt

Diamond
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Location
suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Sorry, I didn't see but is this gasoline or propane?

If its gasoline I would soak/dip the carb in one of those half filled paint cans and carefully rod out all of the passages with a wire stolen from a wire-tag. Then and only then head for the compressed air.

Agree with Tony that the idle jet is probably barely working.
 

Tony Quiring

Titanium
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Location
Madera county california usa
Chemtool is a good "tool"...

They have the spray and pour product.

Back in earlier days when we would do touch up tune up work, plugs, wires, cap rotor etc the carb would not be removed unless needed.

First one uses the spray to clean off outside to just get started.

You could then spray into the float vent or depending on model pour with a funnel.

Spray also into any vent holes.

This raises fuel level shutting off gas supply.

Keep adding and soon running on chemtool.

Pump gas pedal to get it in that circuit.

Shut off and have lunch or do something else for a bit.


Come back and start engine and repeat.

Finished when you run out of stuff.

If car has cat converter do not overspray into carb as that will cause harm to cat.



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matt_isserstedt

Diamond
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Location
suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Also will throw this out...pull spark plugs as an easy first step...i got a pickup truck from a guy who didn't want to work on it...I pulled the plugs and it was like there was fur growing on the end that sticks into the combustion chamber....the only adjuster screw I think he touched was the mixture screws and had that way into the rich zone...
 

jhov

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 5, 2020
Thanks for all the replies. I finally got around to digging into this today. I don't use the lift often but needed it today.. I first did a compression test to make sure I'm not wasting my time troubleshooting it and found all cylinders between 105 and 122 psi. I then pulled the plugs and found they were all different colors. Some looked like they were hot, others just right and one was black. That pointed me to look into the ignition and found the distributor rotor contactor was blackened and worn making poor contact. A little sand paper and careful reassembly and it runs much better now. It needs a new cap and rotor and could still use more tuning but it got it running well enough to use today. I honestly expected it to be something hydraulic related which is way out of my wheel house (and probably expensive). I'm glad it was just simple engine maintenance.
 








 
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