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CNC VMC WARM UP PROGRAM

MAZAK MONKEY

Plastic
Joined
Feb 22, 2023
Location
PA
Hello everyone, i just wanted to share this warm up program that I use to warm up in the morning. its roughly a 10 min program. Its ran in a 15k mazak smooth g vmc. the warm up program uses X Y Z and A( or "C").
the program will start the spindle at 1000 run x,y,z,and c and then increment the spindle 500 rpms over and over until the spindle reaches 14500 rpm. in the machine that its ran in the x and z axis are driven as far as they will go back and fourth. you will have to edit the x and z numbers to fit your machine. the spindle is written using macro common variables that are also very easy to adjust. I myself run this program in a rapid state but at 25%. if you would like you can replace the rapid moves to feed moves.... if you do not have a "A" or "C" axis then just delete the A numbers. comment if youd like or if you need help editing this to make it your own.
Best regards




O1001(WARM UP WITH 500 RPM INCREMENTS)
(USES G59 AS A ZERO )
(SPINDLE WARM UP MACRO)
(WARM UP SPINDLE AND ALL AXIS)
#100= 15000. (MAX SPINDLE SPEED)
#102= 500. (RPM INCREMENTS)
#103=1000. (INITIAL RPM)
#104=#100-#103 (TOTAL RPM INCREASE)
#105=#104/#102 (COUNTER FOR INCREASE)
#101= 30. (WARM UP TIME IN MINUTES)
#106=#101*60. (WARM UP TIME SECONDS)
#107=#106/#105 (DWELL TIME IN SECONDS)
(#3003= 1) (SINGLE BLOCK NOT ALLOWED IF YOU WANT TO USE IT)
(#3004= 7) (OVERRIDE CONTROL NOT ALLOWED IF YOU WANT TO USE IT)
WHILE [ #105 GT 0 ] DO1
M03 S#103 (START SPINDLE)
G04 P20.
#105= #105 - 1
#103= #103 + #102 (INCREASE SPEED)
G28 G91 X0 Y0 Z0
G0 G91 G28 A0.
G0 G90 G59
G0 X-20.68 Y-22.46 M8
X-41.36 Y0. A175.
Z-6.
Z-1.
Z-6.
Z-1.
X-20.68 Y-22.46 A10.
X0 Y0 A180.
G28 G91 X0 Y0 Z0
#3003= 0 (SINGLE BLOCK BACK ON)
#3004= 0 (OVERIDE CONTROL BACK ON)
END1
G0 G91 X-40. (MOVES THE TABLE TO A WORKABLE LOCATION)
G0 G90 M9 M5
M30
 
Many consider it better programming technique to use local variables rather than common variables when the variables will only be used within this program.

On a different note, unless I’m picking up a surface that was partially completed yesterday or something with particularly tight tolerances, I never do a warm up. The Makino is 34 years old and the Mori is 28 years old. Both on original spindles, screws, thrust bearings, etc. Warming up before running routine jobs seems a waste to me.
 
Load first tool. Start spindle at maybe 1000-2000 rpm. Sort out some stuff (3-5 minutes). Run it. Always watch first part. Load second part, push button.
Go take a pee. Repeat pee as needed.
 
I run the spindle while I make coffee, turn on lights check my email. On high speed spindles it is nice to get some heat into it before getting wound up. I dunno if it means anything
 
I warm spindles while I deal with the day before chips, ie cleaning all the crap out of the machines before we get started now that it's all drained of coolant.
 
The nice thing about a 24 hour shop is no warm up. Do not have that now.
But I am pretty punch the clock. Grab the job router and punch in on it.
One knows the machine cold. But what is cold?
One hour out of run, do a warm up thing here? Two hours, four hours, a shift?
Yes, my grinders get pissed off at 10 minutes of not running during a break and we know that.
18 hours since running. Does a warm up make any difference? Real data to back that up?
 
I do machine warmup as per machine manual, however, it is all wired to IOT relay, so by the time I arrive to the shop, machine has done its preparation and ready to shred
 
Do you run this "warm up" before the actual time clock starts or is it lost production time.?
How do you track it?
it is ran 1st thing in the morning. I am constantly working with y axis centerline to C axis withing .0001 so i run this program in the morning or if i know im going to be away from the machine for more than 5 mins or so.
 
Nice little routine.
I run warmups usually if the machine has been sitting idle more than a week.
Looks like you put some thought into this. Very nice.
 
This issue was discussed earlier also.
It was stated that the main purpose of warm up is uniformly lubricating the moving parts before starting actual machining. This is considered desirable because the lubricant has a tendency to accumulate at lower points due to gravity, if the machine remains idle for a long duration.
However, I believe, surface tension will not allow to dry up the contacting surfaces completely.
Still, there is no harm in warming up the machine for a few minutes.
High RPM may not be needed.
Slide movement is also desirable for the same reasons.
 
I try to run the spindle and run the slides a bit further than I normally do to get oil over areas that don't always get used. My thought train is to prevent gunk from piling up on certain areas of the slides.
I don't often run 24 hour shifts but if I am, like I currently am on one machine, I just home it and run it away from the operations movements a few times before the next shift starts.
 
I try to run the spindle and run the slides a bit further than I normally do to get oil over areas that don't always get used. My thought train is to prevent gunk from piling up on certain areas of the slides.
I don't often run 24 hour shifts but if I am, like I currently am on one machine, I just home it and run it away from the operations movements a few times before the next shift starts.
That is exactly why I run the x and y to their travel limits, to prevent gunk and build up. this is done on every machine, every day regardless if it runs or not. we are not a high production slop shop. Majority of our runs are mainly high precision copper(extremly corrosive) & CuNi with lots under 100 parts per run so for me it pays to take as good of care of our machines as possible. The more you neglect your machine (regardless if you own it or not) the harder your job will eventually be.
 
Hello everyone, i just wanted to share this warm up program that I use to warm up in the morning. its roughly a 10 min program. Its ran in a 15k mazak smooth g vmc. the warm up program uses X Y Z and A( or "C").
the program will start the spindle at 1000 run x,y,z,and c and then increment the spindle 500 rpms over and over until the spindle reaches 14500 rpm. in the machine that its ran in the x and z axis are driven as far as they will go back and fourth. you will have to edit the x and z numbers to fit your machine. the spindle is written using macro common variables that are also very easy to adjust. I myself run this program in a rapid state but at 25%. if you would like you can replace the rapid moves to feed moves.... if you do not have a "A" or "C" axis then just delete the A numbers. comment if youd like or if you need help editing this to make it your own.
Best regards
First and foremost. Thank you for sharing. Regardless of whether people want to use it or not, it's cool to simply share something for sharing's sake.

The local variables practice is considered best for this application. Upon starting macro programming I was also using common variables not knowing the difference. No sweat there.

Lastly, I think the warm up process really depends on a lot of factors. If starting from a 14hr standstill, blending surfaces or tight tolerance work @ 14999rpms it makes good sense. The rest of decision tree is up to user.

I do know a colleague of mine was recently warned about his spindle failure. It was replaced by machine tool builder under warranty but was he was directed to warm up spindle in the future.

At least one model of DMG (DMU 75, IIRC?) will not let spindle surpass what machine is thermally ready for. Even if you warm up by running a program, your rpms will be limited until machine is ready for higher RPMS. Cool feature but one better would be to , if rpms MUST be limited, to proportionally reduce then increase feedrates as machine warms up.
 








 
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