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Disassembling a Carlton radial drill for transportation questions?

bsg

Titanium
Joined
Jan 17, 2003
Location
Imlay City, Michigan
Looking at buying a Small Carlton 3a radial drill that weighs 15,500 lbs.......I would like to break this down into three manageable pieces?

My questions, how hard is it to remove the arm and head on 60's Carlton 3a drill?
Anyone ever disassemble one of these machines that far?

Thanks for any help!

Kevin
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
Mm, you could take the drilling head off the arm without too much trouble but that is unlikely to lose you 5,500lbs. In the past I have taken the whole drill ( column/head etc ) off the base but I had the whole lot on the overhead crane all the time. I didn’t lay it down. This was a biggish drill, maybe 11,000lbs.

It could be done alright but you’d need some good cranage, mobile or overhead, with a decent amount of headroom. I wouldn’t want to do it with a fork lift truck for instance.

Some photos of the drill, especially what powers the arm up and down the column, would help with advice.

Regards Tyrone.
 

gbent

Diamond
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Location
Kansas
Small Carlton weighs 15,500#. I love it.

I agree with Philabuster, probably cheaper, certainly less risk to the drill, to hire a rigger. In the absence of positive information, I doubt just removing the column, arm, and head from the base will work. I doubt the base will weigh 5,000+, leaving you with a section that is unbolted and chained to an undersized forklift. If you pull the head from the arm, you could probably handle pulling the arm and column together. But once they are unbolted from the base, what are you going to do to set them down?

We really need pictures!
 

bsg

Titanium
Joined
Jan 17, 2003
Location
Imlay City, Michigan
Thanks everyone for the replies!

Unfortunately a rigger is out of the question, would not be able to get the semi into my location! My biggest concern, a forklift big enough to pick this beast up is going to be north of 22,500 lbs., like a Hyster S150!

Don't think pulling everything off the base is going to get me there either?

Here's an eBay listing of a similar machine for reference.........


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Kevin
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
I wouldn't suggest trying to pick a 15,500 radial drill with a 15K forklift. I would rent a 30 or 36k lift myself, but a 25K would probably do it OK.

I'd sure like to know the forklift I'm using can pick the machine when it's in the middle of the trailer deck. 15,500 lbs top heavy in the center of a trailer deck is 30K forklift territory.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
Like I said, it could be done. Take the drilling head off the arm. Block the arm up with timbers. Remove all the shafts and elevating screw from the arm and the top gearbox etc from the column. Then slide the arm up the column and off at the top. You’d need plenty of good lifting tackle, good cranage, and lots of headroom. Getting a good balanced lift on the arm would be the secret. I’d incorporate a chain block or two into the lift of the arm so you can tune the lift as you go.
If you wanted you could then unbolt the column from the base and lay that down for transportation.

” Who Dares Wins “

Regards Tyrone.
 
Last edited:

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
Last year I scrapped a big Asquith ,which Id pulled into three pieces 20 years ago to shift it.Took the head off the arm,column+arm off the base,and then the base.....base was heavy because it had been filled with concrete somehow,possibly the base was pressure grouted..I had a 8 ton Hyster fork,and my old Coles crane ,and did the job by myself.....but that was 22 years ago.
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
The crowd who shifted my Richmond radial drill and Landis 16x72 grinder would be able to shift that in one piece......truck was a new DAF 8 wheeler ,about 36 ft long ,with a big Palfinger crane that lifted both machines like they wernt there......The driver said he could lift and place 9 tons with the crane.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
Last year I scrapped a big Asquith ,which Id pulled into three pieces 20 years ago to shift it.Took the head off the arm,column+arm off the base,and then the base.....base was heavy because it had been filled with concrete somehow,possibly the base was pressure grouted..I had a 8 ton Hyster fork,and my old Coles crane ,and did the job by myself.....but that was 22 years ago.
It’s alright taking the arm and the column off the base. It’s the laying of them down in one piece for transportation that’s a tricky exercise. That’s unless you somehow plan to move them whilst they are still upright. That could be done. I used to say anything can be done if you’ve got enough time and money to throw at the job.

Regards Tyrone.
 

Overland

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 19, 2017
Location
Greenville, SC
Can you find a big roll-back ?
The large single axle have a gross rating of 33,000 lbs, and I've seen dual axles as well.
Roll-backs are wonderful trucks. Self loading, and a good driver can drop the machine right in the shop.
It's probably going to be an over-height load, but that's what permits are for, or maybe a really short trip, and "ask forgiveness".
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
Can you find a big roll-back ?
The large single axle have a gross rating of 33,000 lbs, and I've seen dual axles as well.
Roll-backs are wonderful trucks. Self loading, and a good driver can drop the machine right in the shop.
It's probably going to be an over-height load, but that's what permits are for, or maybe a really short trip, and "ask forgiveness".

A 33k gross rollback isn't going to pick a 15,500 lb drill very well. When you go to slide and tilt the bed back back up what will happen is the front of the truck goes up in the air.

Single axle rollbacks are good for about a 12k lb small footprint machine or a 15k lb long machine like a lathe. More than that and they can't get the bed back up no matter how good the hydraulics are.

Double axle rollbacks can do it no problem, problem is height. I don't know any company that owns a double axle rollback that will haul overheight on it. It's not worth it to them. Every outfit that has a real heavy class 8 rollback also has 4 or 5 semis permanently hooked to Landoll trailers. Landoll is what you want. They have 36" deck height so you can haul 11' on the deck. They have a very low load angle and you can put the full rated capacity of the trailer on the very tippy back edge and it will lift it without lifting the truck in the air. With the right driver you can get a Landoll into tighter places than you can get a 2 axle rollback.

I've done alot of rigging and a big radial drill is crane or large forklift for me. I will not winch something so top heavy onto a tilted trailer. You always have to consider the worst possible outcome and if a truck's airbag blew out while pulling a big radial on the deck you would lose it off the side. I had an airbag blow on a rollback while unloading a VMC. It was a puckering experience.
 

bsg

Titanium
Joined
Jan 17, 2003
Location
Imlay City, Michigan
I don't want to use riggers, worried about the weight of the forklift and drill damaging my floor, 6" with rebar?
My other concern is my location, getting a loaded semi into my property, no concrete, just crappy clay soil!

Thanks for all the replies, probably just going pass on this machine and look for a smaller model......

Kevin
 








 
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