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Doosan DEM 4000

Andrew M

Plastic
Joined
Mar 27, 2022
Has anyone got, or used, a Doosan DEM 4000? I'm looking at getting one for my home workshop, to do some side jobs and hopefully be able to build up enough work to be able to turn it into a full time thing. I currently work in a machine shop, and run an old 1997 Hartford VMC850 with a Meldas M520 controller, which I run Autodesk Inventor Professional CAM programs on. The workshop just got a brand new Doosan DNM6700 with a 4th axis and Renishaw probe and tool setter ( I haven't seen it as I'm working form home due to Covid restrictions and mandates at the moment), and also have a Puma and a GT2600 lathe, so I'm semi familiar with Doosan products. I do a reasonable amount of surface milling at work on the old machine, and I would be at home too on the DEM. I would also look at getting a 4th axis for the DEM, not straight away though as funds probably won't extend that far initially. Also wondering about Renishaw probe and tool setter, that's even if the DEM 4000 controller can run them, and has, or can cope with, the software for Macros, Rotation, and Scaling?

The DEM 4000 takes BT40 holders, so can you actually get stuck into the job like I can on the bigger ( table travel ) machines at work that are also BT40? The jobs I've already got lined up are in 6061, and that's what I'd prefer to do all my jobs in, but in reality there will likely be some steel and stainless jobs, that I wouldn't want to take all day because I had to go easy on it because the machine doesn't have the guts.

I have looked at other machines, and the DEM is the biggest machine ( apart from Chinese machines ) that will fit under my garage door beam. I haven't really been able to find any useful info on the DEM, apart from the sales brochure, no one seems to have the machine, or they just don't post anything anywhere.
 

DouglasJRizzo

Titanium
Joined
Jun 7, 2011
Location
Ramsey, NJ.
One reason it's a rare bird is that it's primarily an educational machine, meant for schools and training programs. "DEM" - "Doosan Educational Machine."

You would do well to thoroughly research what is standard and what isn't. One reason why it costs less is that many "DNM" features are NOT on the DEM.

If you want a full featured, value mill, the DNM 4500 is the better choice.

Same for the lathes. The LEO is the educational lathe. For a low cost, full featured lathe, the Lynx 2100 2 axis is, IMO, a better choice.
 

CITIZEN F16

Titanium
Joined
May 2, 2021
My dad fit a vf2 into a standard bedroom sized shop with only a 3ft door.

That would be interesting to watch. How many pieces did he break the machine in to? Maybe your dad was like my grandfather, he liked to take things apart just to see how they worked and put them back together.
 

MaxPrairie

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jul 9, 2015
That would be interesting to watch. How many pieces did he break the machine in to? Maybe your dad was like my grandfather, he liked to take things apart just to see how they worked and put them back together.

He actually took the whole side of the building off then placed the machine and replaced the wall. Then had to make a spot in between the trusses for the column to go. I have heard of people removing the Z in order to fit the machine under a door or beam.

There was a post a couple years ago of a guy who worked in a machine shop in the basement of a building and the whole machine had to be disassembled into pieces that would fit into an elevator then reassemble.
 

NWDprecision

Plastic
Joined
Jun 27, 2021
Has anyone got, or used, a Doosan DEM 4000? I'm looking at getting one for my home workshop, to do some side jobs and hopefully be able to build up enough work to be able to turn it into a full time thing. I currently work in a machine shop, and run an old 1997 Hartford VMC850 with a Meldas M520 controller, which I run Autodesk Inventor Professional CAM programs on. The workshop just got a brand new Doosan DNM6700 with a 4th axis and Renishaw probe and tool setter ( I haven't seen it as I'm working form home due to Covid restrictions and mandates at the moment), and also have a Puma and a GT2600 lathe, so I'm semi familiar with Doosan products. I do a reasonable amount of surface milling at work on the old machine, and I would be at home too on the DEM. I would also look at getting a 4th axis for the DEM, not straight away though as funds probably won't extend that far initially. Also wondering about Renishaw probe and tool setter, that's even if the DEM 4000 controller can run them, and has, or can cope with, the software for Macros, Rotation, and Scaling?

The DEM 4000 takes BT40 holders, so can you actually get stuck into the job like I can on the bigger ( table travel ) machines at work that are also BT40? The jobs I've already got lined up are in 6061, and that's what I'd prefer to do all my jobs in, but in reality there will likely be some steel and stainless jobs, that I wouldn't want to take all day because I had to go easy on it because the machine doesn't have the guts.

I have looked at other machines, and the DEM is the biggest machine ( apart from Chinese machines ) that will fit under my garage door beam. I haven't really been able to find any useful info on the DEM, apart from the sales brochure, no one seems to have the machine, or they just don't post anything anywhere.
Doosan DEM4000 is a cracking machine solid as a rock, Basic ISO G CODE machine, Through coolant is not standard optional extra, macros fully enabled AICC contour lookahead, 20 tools BT40 it's also a full ATC not umbrella type. Oh and yes it can snack a 40mm udrill through ss316.

Hope that helps ! Around £55k for the machine with through coolant option
 

rklopp

Diamond
Joined
Feb 27, 2001
Location
Redwood City, CA USA
According to the brochures at least, Bridgeport V710 and V480 can be gotten down to 71” high without taking off more than the stack-light. The tallest operation heights are less than 100”.
 








 
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