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DX32 Directories "." and ".."

russellmakes

New member
Hello, I have a 1996 Bridgeport Torq Cut 22. I've had the machine a couple years now and am still learning of course. I've been running programs from the A drive but recently learned how to store and run programs on the C drive. I like that idea for some of my fleshed out programs that I come back to frequently.
So I started playing with making new directories for organizing these programs. That's when I noticed whenever I create a new directory, there are two "directories" automatically created titled "." and ".." I realize "cd .." is DOS for moving up a level, but is that what these are? I can't enter DOS commands in this space. I also see in the upper right, "<.> = WorkDIR". What does that mean? This is the only mention of "WorkDir" or "work directories" and there's no description in the manual.
I can't seem to figure out why they're displayed with the rest of the directories. In the illustrations in the manual they aren't there. I'd like to eliminate them if I can. Thank you.
Cheers.
directories.jpg
 

rabler

Member
From a computer operating system perspective they need to exist, sort of short hand for how files and directories are organized. Usually they are hidden, don’t have any advice specific to that system on how to hide them or why they are showing up.
 

sfriedberg

Active member
"." is an alias for "this directory" and ".." is an alias for "parent directory of this directory". At the very top of the directory tree, either ".." doesn't exist or it's another alias for "this directory". They are displayed in the list of files and directories because they are names of directories. Some systems automatically suppress showing any name beginning with ".". I have not idea what the applicable features of your control are in this regard.

"current working directory" starts out as whatever directory you are in when you launch your app.

A relative path name is one that starts implicitly at the current working directory. So if you have two directories, ProgramA and ProgramB, and they each contain files called RunMe (and ProgramA/RunMe is different from ProgramB/RunMe), the version of RunMe you get depends on whether ProgramA or ProgramB is your current working directory.

An absolute path name starts explicitly at the top of your directory tree and works all the way down. On Windows, these start with a drive letter, like C:\Programs\ProgramA\RunMe. On POSIX-style systems (Unix, Linux, etc) absolute paths start with a slash, like /Programs/ProgramA/RunMe.
 

russellmakes

New member
Thank you both for the help understanding the operating system. I guess the question I should be asking is how do I hide them from this menu? They aren't shown in the manual so I assume they don't "need" to be there/visible, and perhaps shouldn't be there.
I realize I could just ignore them, but I'd rather not.
Here's a clip from the manual:
Screenshot (2).jpg
 

sfriedberg

Active member
I am going to make a guess. If the dot names show up on the C: drive but not the A: drive, I'm guessing you can't turn it off. But if the dot names show up on both drives, and they didn't use to show up on the A: drive, there's probably an option you can set someplace to control whether they appear. The answer really depends on your control, which I know nothing about.
 

russellmakes

New member
Ah ha! We figured it out! You prompted me to look to see if they appeared on the A: drive. They didn't, but then I thought, wait, I'm on the root (A:\). So I went to C:\. Not there! So I made a "test" directory on A:. Went to A:\test. There they are!
They must just be indicating that you are in some level of directories.
Thanks for the help!
directories1.jpg
directories2.jpg
directories3.jpg
 








 
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