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Favorite hand tool brands no longer available

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
We called those drills "punch drills", and used the heck out of them when I was a kid. Anyplace you would use a drill-driver now, we used those.

Ours were brass-plated steel, mostly, and had the storage for drills under the handle cap. The cap had a hole, and a ball with spring as a snap retainer. You pushed down the ball, and turned the hole to whatever size drill you wanted, and tipped up the drill to slide it out.

Drills had a notch on the shank, and had half of the end removed for 0.1" or so. The notch was a retainer notch, and the end took the drive. The nose of the drill had a sleeve that either pushed in, or pulled out, depending on maker, to let the drill slide in. When the nose sleeve was released, it moved a ball into the notch to hold the drill in place, if you had it rotated to the right position.

They worked pretty well, despite having drills that looked like a figure-8 in cross section, straight fluted, with a standard point.
I still have two Handyman push drills. Years ago I even modified a 1/4" hex drive extension to fit the Handyman chuck so I could use it with standard insert bits.
 

Peter S

Diamond
Joined
May 6, 2002
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
When I started using my fathers tools in the 1960's, water pump pliers were known as "Gland-ups". Adjustable spanners were "Crescent" whoever made them. Dad had 6 inch German "crescent". The screw/jaw operated in reverse to all others. No wonder they lost the war.

Nowadays I have Stahlwille "Box 13" R&OE spanners -superb tools. Also Stahlwille 1/2" socket set. Snap on side cutter & long nose pliers - very good.
I prefer my old NZ-made screwdrivers (Lincoln Turner) to my Snap on set.
 








 
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