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Finishing aluminum edges by hand or with a custom tool?

rons

Diamond
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Location
California, USA
Got these pieces with fine edges that just break off with a finger nail. Remember to drink you Knox.
Hitting a file on everything will be non-professional. And will look rounded over but probably look ok.
What about a 45 degree bevel with a consistent flat?

The wooden tool with the carbide bar at an angle was made to turn the bevel on scrapers for wood.
If this idea was applied at 45 degrees it would smash the sharp edge down and probably make everything look
consistent. But nothing gets cut off. Probably falls of later.

Asking this is for only 4 so no big deal. What about 40 or 100? What is done to remove the sharp edges. As they sit here they can cut DP paper.
I thought about an abrasive tumbler but I would like to keep the finish on the flat side. Or a v-groove wheel mounted on a axle. Roll it down every
edge. But it still just would smash the edge down. The piece lying down has been cleaned up. The others look like there is a big edge on top.
It is an illusion. A finger nail could break it.

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I deburr parts all the time with swiss needle files, a normal hook deburring tool, or with a rotary burr in a high speed spindle. Obviously it's better to deburr in the machine but sometimes it isn't worth it for a couple of parts or having to setup a backside op just to back chamfer. Those parts I'd probably just hit with a scotchbrite wheel on a pedestal grinder and would take less time that typing this sentence.

Vibratory finishing won't change the flat surfaces like rotary finishing can.
 
I assume you are making these on a manual mill? Why not just use a rubber bonded buffing wheel? It will remove a small amount of material, but with a light touch will make a nice rounded over edge.
 
I like a small (I use an ⅛" 60,000 rpm Dotco) die grinder with a carbide burr, climb cut. Very quick and leaves no burred edges. Been doing it that way for a dog's age. Sort of like Renzetti's deburring tool but depth controlled only by me. I can get deburred edges by hand that look like they were done by machine, but that little tool he made would probably be even faster. And probably less prone to rounding corners. That's one spot you've got to take care when doing by hand.
 
The 3m rubber finger abrasive wheels for flexshaft/dremal are what I would try first. You need to stack a few on your arbor.
 
Given there’s only four I’d file them with a few fine files. If I couldn’t get them all looking the same and really nicely de-burred I’d give up. More than single figures of the components would be another story.
Having said that I had to de-burr 144 items quite similar to those when I was an apprentice. I haven’t forgotten it either.

Regards Tyrone.
 
Given there’s only four I’d file them with a few fine files. If I couldn’t get them all looking the same and really nicely de-burred I’d give up. More than single figures of the components would be another story.
Having said that I had to de-burr 144 items quite similar to those when I was an apprentice. I haven’t forgotten it either.

Regards Tyrone.
As lads we all had jobs like that, one of mine was cutting holes with a Bosch jigsaw in sheet metal plenum chambers for warm air heating ducts, 3 holes in each x 108 chambers.
 
Why not break the edges in the machine? Are you using a manual machine?
Yes. The machine has eight fingers and two thumbs.
To get a consistent line with a file I use a wood block with a 45 degree bevel as a guide.

Edge breaking and de-burring are not the same. A heavy handed de-bur will get me a broken edge.
 
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Given there’s only four I’d file them with a few fine files. If I couldn’t get them all looking the same and really nicely de-burred I’d give up. More than single figures of the components would be another story.
I watch documentaries of watch makers doing extremely fine work with files and scrapers.

Hand filing curves and the straights attached to them is hard. I'm trying not for a rounded edged. A flat edge at 45 degrees. Like .010 wide.
By reading comments I got an idea for a depth gauge for a rotary wheel tool. The only kind I have is a Dremel that was given to me. I hate
the Dremel. It's sound reminds of the Stuka dive bomber. What a hideous sound.

The date on that newspaper is March 3, 2016. It's taken long enough for some action to be taken.
 
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The deburring tool which is a slight S shape and swivels in a pen size handle. They are everywhere. And I don't like them that way.
There is another blade that looks like a birds beak and it does a good job for holes. Can't find that shape anymore.
I have a diamond stone and a OptiVISOR.
 
I was shocked when i bought one of these and it worked as good, if not better, than the video ad I saw them used in.


We got a cheapy one (~50 bucks) and it worked great on some large tooling plates I had to mill.

They will work fine for the parts in your picture, too. They are small but I am sure it will work. You'll have to hold them in a vise. But you can end up having a pretty damn decent small edge break everywhere. The size is adjustable.

Seriously was super happy with how well it worked. Saved me a ton of die grinding and "hooking" edges.
 
The deburring tool which is a slight S shape and swivels in a pen size handle. They are everywhere. And I don't like them that way.
There is another blade that looks like a birds beak and it does a good job for holes. Can't find that shape anymore
My Brother has using it down,
for internal use, it's quick and sharp
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Get an NSK = Nakanishi spindle and the right deburring tool.
It´s almost noiseless and very very fast.

You probably won´t like the price, and might not afford it.
 








 
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