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had cataract surgery- going crazy!

I have worn trifocals for years, and not the kind that don't have the lines. Most vain people opt for the multifocal lenses that don't have lines, but I find it easier to focus on objects thru the 3 distinct separate lenses in the trifocals.

When my sight started to dim because of cataracts, I had them replaced with implant lenses. I had a discussion with the eye surgeon on the different types of implants available. You can get a single vision implant for either far or near vision. You can also get a implant that focuses on all distances near and far. I asked how this is possible, the told me that the all distance implant was a fresnel lense. Although this has all distance properties, the vision through the fresnel lense is not as crisp as a single vision far or near implant. Also, my Medicare insurance covered the single vision implant, and if I wanted the multifocal implants, It would cost an additional $1,500 per eye.

Since I already was used to wearing trifocals, I opted for the implant with a far vision focus. I have had my implants for four years now, and I have no complaints. I have been used to trifocals for years, plus I need to wear safety glasses in the shop anyway.

I had a exam recently by the eye surgeon, and I have 20-20 vision, and my current prescription for trifocals is still good.

If you are worrying about wearing glasses all the time, why don't you get some decent glasses. I have a pair of ultra-light glasses with titanium metal hinge-less bows and titanium bridge. My rimless lenses are made of Cryzal and are held to the bows and bridge with some type of rivets.

They are not cheap, but are extremely light and comfortable to wear, and are amazingly sturdy. They have survived for four years without any damage or noticable scratches. The Cryzal lenses are more resistant to scratches that glass lenses. They also resist dust and smudges. I always use pre-moistened lens cleaning towettes about once every 3 days. I don't use anything else to touch the lenses.

I have been treating for diabetes for about 6 years or more. I make sure I watch my blood sugar and take my medications, and my eyes have not suffered any diabetic damage. For your information, I am 76 years old. My experience with cataract surgery was very positive, and I thought my experiences would help you.

Lord Byron
 
If you are working the shop, you want safety glasses anyway, you can now get safety glasses with readers in them. I wear dark ones as sunglasses and the others in the shop.

Here's ONE example (not my favorite, first ones I found again)
AOSafety BX Bifocal Safety Glasses With Clear Anti-Fog Lens

Not the ones I use, but you get the idea. The part that isn't a close-up lens is a clear safety glass like you should be wearing in the shop regardless.

As for what you are living through, my sympathies. When they removed your lens (the part obstructed by the cataract) they also removed the part that provides "accomodation" - so your vision is now fixed according to the shape of your eyeball. Once both eyes are happy and your brain adjusts, properly set up reading/close-up lenses should work fine.

By the way, unlike toolbert, I've had good luck getting somewhat specialized glasses made by an optomitrist, but nothing like costco. And I think they're relatively sophisticated optomitrists. (I live in the same metro area as Toolbert.)
 
Had both eyes done, replacing the lenses--each eye was done on different occasions. What a blessing, but I do need reading glasses...distance vision is super.

I share your feelings--though prior to my cataract repair my vision was 20/13 throughout most of my life, and I feel I was blessed with these puppies. Cataracts threw me a curve--but it was a relatively long curve...

Even after the replacements, I could feel my eyes attempting accommodation, even though the lenses are "fixed" but our eyes are amazing little machines in their own right, and the new lens is accepted over a relatively short period of time...

While I've not done this, my reading glasses are a pain sometimes--and I've though about adding jeweler's loupes to my reading glasses when I'm working with small things...

Otherwise, I use safety glasses over my reading glasses when I need to...even though I looked like I just landed from another planet! :eek:

Glad your surgery went well, by the way...

Joe
 
on tues. i had my right eye done. the surgery was a breeze.
i`ve never had good eyesight and the last couple years it had gotten worse and worse.
so now i can drive w/out glasses! BUT what is making me crazy is i can`t see anything up close and unlike before the closer i get the worse it gets!
i can`t see machine dials good enough to tell if i`m lined up or not!!
logic would say just to pop out one lens of my glasses but that makes things worse somehow?? kind of like double vision.
i`m sceduled to get the left eye done too. i guess i`m looking for someone to tell me that they have experienced this too.
i don`t really know anyone else that has had cataracts that wasn`t in their sixties or seventies.
so when all is said and done will just wearing glasses when i`m at the machines make it all ok?? that is my hope anyway. :)
I too was very nearsighted from birth, and had cataract surgery late in life. I tried "transition" glasses, a disaster. I have been wearing trifocal glasses since then, and they work for me. It takes patience to adapt, but I am living proof that it works. One thing, pre surgery, I would would whip off my glasses to see the smallest details when other guys needed a magnifier. It became so automatic, that I continued doing it for some time, and felt foolish afterwards. Find what works best for you.
 
in my 50's i had a detached retina, which after surgery and the eyeball finally filling back up again, results in a cataract because of all the time the lens was dried out. The retina surgeon was a woodworker who had read about my handplanes, and picked the cataract surgeon, who also did woodwork. They decided between them that my focus needed to be about 12 - 16" for reading and close handwork and machining. I did not have enough experience to argue one way or another, except to point out that i was also a pilot and needed to pass the eye test every 2 years.

I'm pretty happy with the close vision, and it has not been much of a factor with farther vision (corrected with glasses) in my normal eye. If i close one eye alternately and compare them, things at a distance with glasses that correct both eyes to 20:20 look larger with the eye that has the plastic lens installed. At 71 in a couple months, my normal eye, which has been somewhat nearsighted since 8th grade, is still doing ok. But i want to really understand the options when/if it becomes necessary to have cataract surgery in that eye and determine what focal distance to opt for. One of my fellow ski instructors who is 73 had distance vision put in both eyes a few years ago, and says he has never seen better. He uses the simple cheap magnifier glasses from the drugstore to read and says it's no problem. OTOH, he is not a machinist nor other craftsperson. He's just thrilled he does not have to wear glasses, which fog, under his goggles anymore.
 
I'm surprised that no one who had cataract surgery replaced the lens with a focusing lens. When I had my cataracts removed, they were replaced with "Crystal-lens" devices, which the eye can focus both near and far, just like a natural lens. At 70 years, I can drive, read, use the computer, woodwork, metalwork and all the other stuff without the need for corrective lenses.

(This thread was TL;DR and most was 13+ years old, so I don't know if anyone mentioned having a self-focusing device implanted.)
 
I'm surprised that no one who had cataract surgery replaced the lens with a focusing lens. When I had my cataracts removed, they were replaced with "Crystal-lens" devices, which the eye can focus both near and far, just like a natural lens. At 70 years, I can drive, read, use the computer, woodwork, metalwork and all the other stuff without the need for corrective lenses.

(This thread was TL;DR and most was 13+ years old, so I don't know if anyone mentioned having a self-focusing device implanted.)
I had heard of those, and I'm interested. As a pilot myself at age 60, and a hobbyist metalworker the thought of seeing just like I did when I was twenty is pretty appealing (or even better as I am myopic since age 12 or so). At 16 I got contacts and that was probably the next best thing to perfect vision. Around 40, I started losing near vision and had to start carrying readers around with me. It didn't make a lot of sense to me to wear the contacts and still have to have glasses with me, so I opted to ditch the contacts for progressive lens glasses.

The downside to progressives is that there is a narrow range at which the "near" focusing section of the lens works. This gets really annoying when flying as the GPS (add-on to a 1968 Piper) screen is way over on the copilot's side of the cockpit and I have to do some serious neck contortions to see the screen clearly (and lose the instrument picture temporarily).

In short, what a drag it is getting old.
 
In short, what a drag it is getting old.
Yes, it is, but is slightly better than the alternative.

I got my replacement lenses in 2006, one on one day, the other two days later. The first thing that I really noticed, was just how yellow my old lenses had become over the years. Greens were now truly green and blues blue. The contrast between the two lenses in the two days between procedures was stark. Close one eye and see everything with a yellow tint, then close the other eye and see things in bright, true colors. I've had no regrets and would do it again. If anything, I would have done it years earlier.
 








 
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