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Hauser 3BA jig borer, ever used one ? (photo)

  • Thread starter D. Thomas
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D

D. Thomas

Guest
Saturday I traded a drill grinder for a Hauser 3BA jig borer. Previously owned by IBM, appears in pristine condition but I can't get the quill to move and wondering if it's just stuck from years of sitting or is there some trick I'm missing ? (anyone got a manual ?)

hauser.jpg
 

GeneralG

Cast Iron
Joined
Feb 23, 2003
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Well, I have some experience with jig borers, but a SIP, not Hauser, Hauser are beautifully made Swiss machines though. Best I can tell you is the obvious, check for quill locking mechanism, probably somewhere on the head, I doubt it's seized up, it doesn't look rusty at all. I'd just tool around with the head a bit, definitely don't yank on the quill feed or try to force anything, don't wanna damage it. Nice machine BTW!

General G
 

Brian

Stainless
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
Location
Phoenix, AZ USA
I don't know about this particular reference, but we called the fuses in the electrical system "heaters", they were usually "T" shaped, held in by two screws and had wire wrapped around the vertical part of the "T". All I can remember is having to change out all of them on a big gun drill I converted from 440V to 220V. Maybe the reference is to those? Very slick looking machine, by the way.

Brian
 
D

D. Thomas

Guest
Haven't connected it to power yet but there is something on a nameplate about ~quill heaters~ ! You don't suppose these Swiss fanatics actually made the spindle bore so close that you have to ~heat it up~ first do you ??
smile.gif
 

sultanabran

Aluminum
Joined
Jul 29, 2002
Location
Melbourne Australia
Nice machine. I have a 2BA and a 2BS which is a combined jig borer /grinder. These are older machines than yours I think.
A friend of mine took his "speed variator" apart. A very complex bit of machinery. He has a manual for his jig grinder (a larger machine) but it might have parts in common
 

Screwmachine

Titanium
Joined
Mar 8, 2001
Location
Switzerland
Haven't seen a quill heater, but a friend of mine has had his SIP quill not want to raise after long periods of running. Wouldn't surprise me. Evidently SIP had a 7 year process from rough casting to finished piece, most of that time being "aging" between machining operations. Also heard that it wasn't abnormal to take 3 days to lap the quill to the bore in the head.

Is it engaged for power downfeed? That'll lock the quill up easy enough.

Stew
 

GeneralG

Cast Iron
Joined
Feb 23, 2003
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Yeah, now that Stew mentions about the SIP quill locking up after extended use, heat causes metal to expand, cold causes it to contract, at least that's what I was always taught. It would be interesting to know what these "quill heaters" are, and what they do.

General G
 

CBlair

Diamond
Joined
Sep 23, 2002
Location
Lawrenceville GA USA
If you are talking about Brian's post on heaters, I believe he is talking about the thermal overload that is used on motor starters. These overloads will trip if overheated, as if a motor locks up, and after cooling down can be reset. Some older ones cannot be reset and look like big fuses.

These are often called heaters by people who work in the maintenance industry and I do not believe his post was in reguard to the quill at all.

As far as the quill being locked up does the quill have a power feed option? If that is still ingaged it would likely prevent it from being operated manually. Just a thought.

Charles
 
D

D. Thomas

Guest
Ran the Hauser today....sweet ! Just turn the little dial on the head for variable speeds...unlike a Bridgeport there is no resistance or delay when turning the dial...just like turning a volume control on a radio. Push "up" or "down" button and the whole column raises and lowers.

I freed the quill....was just too much cosmoline, and the quill power feed works. The only issue is the quill is still stiffer than I like. I wonder if it's supposed to be that way due to no counterweight ? Sure would like to find a manual.
 
D

D. Thomas

Guest
Here's the mysterious "heater" nameplate...which I now know mentions nothing about the quill whatsoever...was going by the apparently false memory of the previous owner.

hauser1.jpg


hauser2.jpg


Electrical panel for spindle motor on, column up/down, and table dial lamps
 

Brian

Stainless
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
Location
Phoenix, AZ USA
Ahhh... That's for warming up the machine, so there is no changes dimensionally as it warms up. We used to run a small bushing for Motorola, they wanted .0002 tolerance on the o.d., we ran them on the old Hardinge CHNC and would cycle the machine without a part on it for about an hour to get it up to temp and then the operator would start running the parts and while she was going on them, no potty breaks or stepping away from the machine, you had to keep the same rythm and timing or you'd start loosing pieces. Very cool, never seen such a thing, but it makes sense.

Brian
 
D

D. Thomas

Guest
After sitting for a week or so, I tried the quill again and now it moves beautifully...even slowy returns, so there must be a quill spring. Man, there is something so sweet about a quill that, when you pull on the handwheel, you perceive absolutely no rack or quill play whatsoever. The rack is bevel cut, which may expain the smoothness. Guess all it needed was to sit awhile after some CRC treatment.
 
D

D. Thomas

Guest
Yep, now if I could just figure out what I need this for
biggrin.gif
I'm such a machine nutcase, I've often been temped to buy machines and then design a product that needs the machine
wink.gif
 

JimK

Diamond
Joined
Apr 25, 2003
Location
Berkeley Springs, WV, USA
I notice you all are having fun with small jig borers. Yes they are fun and they are beautiful to run but, they are very serious machine tools.

The Hauser 2 BA and 3 BA, along with the MP 2K SIP and the No 1 1/2, 2 and 3 Moore all belong to the same class of small jig borers. Espically the Moore was used by the punch and die makers. Again referring to my analogy of the printing plate, the care with which it is made determnies the outcome of thousands of units of product.

A single punch can be lined right up with the die and stripper, but seldom is there a single punch. Some punch and die units have hundreds of punches many of differing sizes. To get all the punches to line up with all the dies and strippers takes fantastic accuracy in the placement of all the holes involved. Think of a modern progressive die - wow!

Factories that make their fortunes selling products that rely on stampings have no trouble justifying the cost of some small jig borers. Hoever the jig borers in that trade work hard. To keep up with making new tooling and repairing old tooling which many times are made in duplicate,these cute little machines ran every day, sometimes two shifts.

They have to be accurate and be able to stay accurate after thousands of hours running time.

The Moore, Sip and Hauser machines of that size were all made to be operated from the sitting position. Every control was placed for the maximum convenience. These things were run 8 hours a day, the operator had to like them.

I am not sure about the Hauser machnes, but the MP 2K SIP had its spindle head mounted in an INVAR frame. Tha Deckel LK series jig borers had an INVAR compensator bar.
The use of INVAR kept the spindle in its original "Y" setting as the machine warmed up.

The Moore didn't require such a set up because the Moore's driving machinery was on top of the column instead of within it and the spindle head and quill didn't suffer from the heating of the driving machinery.

The Moore shank tools could be changed from the sitting position. A simple thing like that could have been the reason that Moore was always the favorite of the tool and die industry. Moore, as far as I know, didn't make boring tools. They seem to have offered the sliding eccentric boring heads common to US parctice in several different sizes. Individual jig borers would have many of these heads assignd to it. They were set for a definite sized hole and used as necessary.

The SIP and Hauser machines found favor in the precision mechanisms industry. I feel that that was because of the many ccessories offered with the Swiss machines. The Swiss offered sophisticated adjustable boring bars and a rather comprehensive line of setting devices and rotary tables.

The work in the instrument industry isn't as intensive as that in the tool and die industries but the work requires more versatility in the machine set ups since, unlike a punch and die set, Instrument and mechanism work has to be machined on many sides.

These small jig borers require a calm and steady temperament on the part of the operator. The work is always delicate and demanding. Shops doing instrument work or specialised design work can benefit from having one of these machines, but I really wouldn't reccommend one for general use in an ordinary machine shop.

The machines should always be under temperature controlled conditions and free from shock and vibration, especally the SIP MP 2K which has a roller mounted table and saddle.
This machine with its optically read SIP standard scales is almost a metrological instrument rather than a machine tool.

The Hauser 2 BA and 3 BA machines are rather hardy, like the Moore machines. They can survive a clean machine shop but they will not survive overloading. None of them will do well in dirty conditions.

Linley (later Boyar Shultz) made an American pattern jig borer with non compesated leadscrew settings. They were very accurate in the machine shop sense and made a practical machine for a better class of small work, without the formalities of the expensive and sphisticated machines. Anyone doing model steam engines would do no better than the Linley and these machines aren't expensive on the used market.

Jim Kizale
 

doug w6pug

Plastic
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Location
CA USA
Quill heater was designed into upper end jig borers so to keep the tolerances in the quill shaft (like a journal) at steady temp when not actually running the machine (at least, this is what I was taught) .... the machines' tolerances are very temp dependent; when you are boring, temps are higher beause you are running the machine at some load; when you remove the piece or go off to do something else but going to come back to the borer later, you don't want the machine (journal) to cool down, so the heaters were designed into the spindle head.
 

Swampass

Plastic
Joined
May 20, 2022
I notice you all are having fun with small jig borers. Yes they are fun and they are beautiful to run but, they are very serious machine tools.

The Hauser 2 BA and 3 BA, along with the MP 2K SIP and the No 1 1/2, 2 and 3 Moore all belong to the same class of small jig borers. Espically the Moore was used by the punch and die makers. Again referring to my analogy of the printing plate, the care with which it is made determnies the outcome of thousands of units of product.

A single punch can be lined right up with the die and stripper, but seldom is there a single punch. Some punch and die units have hundreds of punches many of differing sizes. To get all the punches to line up with all the dies and strippers takes fantastic accuracy in the placement of all the holes involved. Think of a modern progressive die - wow!

Factories that make their fortunes selling products that rely on stampings have no trouble justifying the cost of some small jig borers. Hoever the jig borers in that trade work hard. To keep up with making new tooling and repairing old tooling which many times are made in duplicate,these cute little machines ran every day, sometimes two shifts.

They have to be accurate and be able to stay accurate after thousands of hours running time.

The Moore, Sip and Hauser machines of that size were all made to be operated from the sitting position. Every control was placed for the maximum convenience. These things were run 8 hours a day, the operator had to like them.

I am not sure about the Hauser machnes, but the MP 2K SIP had its spindle head mounted in an INVAR frame. Tha Deckel LK series jig borers had an INVAR compensator bar.
The use of INVAR kept the spindle in its original "Y" setting as the machine warmed up.

The Moore didn't require such a set up because the Moore's driving machinery was on top of the column instead of within it and the spindle head and quill didn't suffer from the heating of the driving machinery.

The Moore shank tools could be changed from the sitting position. A simple thing like that could have been the reason that Moore was always the favorite of the tool and die industry. Moore, as far as I know, didn't make boring tools. They seem to have offered the sliding eccentric boring heads common to US parctice in several different sizes. Individual jig borers would have many of these heads assignd to it. They were set for a definite sized hole and used as necessary.

The SIP and Hauser machines found favor in the precision mechanisms industry. I feel that that was because of the many ccessories offered with the Swiss machines. The Swiss offered sophisticated adjustable boring bars and a rather comprehensive line of setting devices and rotary tables.

The work in the instrument industry isn't as intensive as that in the tool and die industries but the work requires more versatility in the machine set ups since, unlike a punch and die set, Instrument and mechanism work has to be machined on many sides.

These small jig borers require a calm and steady temperament on the part of the operator. The work is always delicate and demanding. Shops doing instrument work or specialised design work can benefit from having one of these machines, but I really wouldn't reccommend one for general use in an ordinary machine shop.

The machines should always be under temperature controlled conditions and free from shock and vibration, especally the SIP MP 2K which has a roller mounted table and saddle.
This machine with its optically read SIP standard scales is almost a metrological instrument rather than a machine tool.

The Hauser 2 BA and 3 BA machines are rather hardy, like the Moore machines. They can survive a clean machine shop but they will not survive overloading. None of them will do well in dirty conditions.

Linley (later Boyar Shultz) made an American pattern jig borer with non compesated leadscrew settings. They were very accurate in the machine shop sense and made a practical machine for a better class of small work, without the formalities of the expensive and sphisticated machines. Anyone doing model steam engines would do no better than the Linley and these machines aren't expensive on the used market.

Jim Kizale
Actually, the Moore spindle housing was also made from INVAR.
 








 
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